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Jun
30

Angry Robot 5: Lee’s Top 5

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Tuesday 1 July marks 5 years from Angry Robot’s first books – Lauren Beukes‘ Moxyland and Kaaron Warren‘s Slights – and we are celebrating this anniversary, over the next 5 days, with daily staff blog posts and giveaways! Author guest posts and other cool giveaways will be popping up on various sites so keep an eye out for our #AngryRobot5 on Twitter for new posts.

First up is our Senior Editor, Lee Harris, with his Top 5 Reasons Angry Robot Rules, and his choice of giveaway is The Knights of Breton Court (omnibus edition x 5) by Maurice Broaddus. Details of this giveaway, and why Lee chose The Knights of Breton Court are at the end of this post.

Top 5 Reasons Angry Robot Rules

5. A Home for New Talent

In the 5 years since Angry Robot first started publishing, we’ve published the debut novels of TWENTY-ONE authors:

Lauren Beukes – Moxyland
Kaaron Warren – Slights
Mike Shevdon – Sixty-One Nails
Aliette de Bodard – Servant of the Underworld
Lavie Tidhar – The Bookman
Ian Whates – City of Dreams and Nightmare
Maurice Broaddus – King Maker
Guy Haley – Reality 36
Jo Anderton – Debris
Adam Christopher – Empire State
David Tallerman – Giant Thief
Chris F Holm – Dead Harvest
Anne Lyle – The Alchemist of Souls
Madeline Ashby – vN
Lee Battersby – The Corpse-Rat King
Lee Collins – The Dead of Winter
Ramez Naam – Nexus
Emma Newman – Between Two Thorns
Wesley Chu – The Lives of Tao
Jay Posey – Three
Craig Cormick – The Shadow Master

With plenty more to come, including:

Carrie Patel – The Buried Life
Susan Murray – The Waterborne Blade
Ferrett Steinmetz – Flex
Ishbelle Bee – The Singula and Extraordinary Tale of Mirror and Goliath
Alyc Helms – The Dragons of Heaven

4. Marc Gascoigne Wins the 2011 World Fantasy Award

Angry Robot founder and head honcho Marc Gascoigne won the World Fantasy Special Award (Professional) for his work in setting up and running Angry Robot. And bloody well deserved it was, too!

3. DRM-free ebooks

We’re big fans of the ebook format, and we know that many of you are, too. We’re also big fans of not crippling the format with unnecessary and impractical restrictions. This is why we’ve always been DRM-free, and always will be.

2.  Clonefiles – Ebook /Paperback Bundling

We believe if you’ve paid for a paperback you should get the ebook included. In 2012 we ran a limited pilot in the UK to offer this service through independent bookshops. In 2013 we announced we would be opening this pilot up to indie stores in the US, and this has started to happen. It was such a great idea that Amazon announced their version of the programme shortly after us (though many of the ebooks in their Matchbook scheme have to be paid for, albeit at discount).

1. Those Covers!

They say you can’t judge a book by its cover. I say bollocks. But whatever your thoughts on the matter, you certainly can judge a publisher on its covers. And look at some of the gorgeousness we’ve brought you over the last five years, under Marc Gascoigne’s Art Directorshipness. Take your time. Appreciate the different styles, and the love that has gone into each and every one.

Empire State by Adam ChristopherThe Marching Dead by Lee Battersby, April 2013

Zoo City by Lauren BeukesThe Lives of Tao by Wesley ChuThe Mad Scientist's Daughter by Cassandra Rose Clarke - Feb 2013Dead Harvest, by Chris F. HolmThe Damned Busters by Matthew HughesThe Alchemist of Souls by Anne LyleThree, by Jay Posey, artwork by Stephen Mayer-RassowHeartwood by Freya RobertsonSixty-One Nails by Mike Shevdon, new cover artThe Great Game by Lavie Tidhar - you know you want itNightTerrors-300dpiSlights - in UK stores 1 July 09Blackbirds, by Chuck Wendig

 

Lee’s Giveaway

CThe Knights of Breton Court cover (Joey HiFI) - October 2012aroline has asked me to choose a book for today’s giveaway.

Maurice Broaddus’s King Maker (first of the Knights of Breton Court trilogy) was the first book I actively championed when I joined Angry Robot. It’s a fantastic retelling of the Arthurian myth, set on the mean streets of Indianapolis. So, my giveaway is going to be the entire trilogy: The Knights of Breton Court x 5!

Entry Details

To enter, simply comment on this post with your Top 5 TV shows. Winner will be picked at random. Entries will close tomorrow, Tuesday at 12.01pm BST, when we will have Marc’s post with another giveaway!

For brownie points, join in our #AngryRobot5 conversation on Twitter and tell us about your favourite Angry Robot book, or if you haven’t read one yet, which you would like to pick first! Don’t forget to include us: @angryrobotbooks

The wonderful James A. Moore has written an exclusive short story for all you fans of the Fellein Empire. Did you love Seven Forges and can’t wait until The Blasted Lands is released? Immerse yourself in the mountainous world, and count the days down until The Blasted Lands is published, which is currently 38 days, 8 hours, 23 minutes, and 32, 31, 30, 29, 28…. seconds.

When Korwa Fell

By James A. Moore

Captain Merros Dulver glanced over at the rider closest to him as they headed for Fellein from the Seven Forges. The journey was a long one and he was tired of staring at the barren landscape. It was time for a distraction. The Sa’ba Taalor were mysteries, even after a few weeks of riding together, they spoke and they answered questions, but as often as not they asked questions and then rode away to contemplate what they had learned.

       The one closest was a brute named Tusk. Under their armor and furs most of the people from the valley of the Seven Forges seemed large, but Tusk dwarfed the majority. He sported a great helmet like the skull of a beast and the mouth of that skull was decorated with teeth of all kinds. Real teeth, actually. A variety that boggled the mind. He didn’t much want to know what had happened to the donors of those decorations.

       “Tusk?”

       The man cast eyes his way, his face hidden behind both his helmet and the veil covering the lower half. The veils were there for protection from the weather and also because, according to Drask Silver Hand—the first of the people Merros and his fellow explorers had run across—neither Merros nor any of his people were ready to see the faces of the Sa’ba Taalor. That last was according to their gods. The Sa’ba Taalor seemed to have a very open relationship with their deities. Merros had never followed any of the gods very closely and to the best of his knowledge none of them had ever paid him the least bit of attention. He failed to see any sort of problem with that.

       Tusk’s eyes gave of a faint silvery glow in the perpetual twilight of the Blasted Lands. “Yes, Merros Dulver?”

       “Just call me Merros, if you prefer. I wanted to ask what your people believe happened here, in the Blasted Lands, to make them this way.”

       Tusk looked at him for a moment and the monstrous mount he rode let out a sound that was suspiciously like a chuckle. The only reason that Merros could understand the strangers riding with him was because he had been “gifted” with the ability to understand them.  He might have preferred that someone ask him if he wanted the gift before it was given, but that was hardly the issue. What puzzled him was the near-certainty that the predatory monster Tusk was riding on seemed to understand his words. Even the animals of the Sa’ba Taalor seemed to know more than they wanted to admit.

       Sure enough, the eyes of the animal were looking directly at him and glowing under the masking helmet that hid half of its face. He suppressed the desire to shudder.

       Tusk scratched at the map of scars across his hand and shrugged his massive shoulders.

       “We are told that there was a war between two great countries. The war ended with the creation of these lands.”

       Merros looked the man up and down. “That’s all?”

       “I can tell you the full story if you’d like.” Tusk sounded rather amused by the notion as if he might be preparing to tell a bedtime story to a child.

       Merros replied, “Well, I know what my people say happened. I want to hear what your people have to say.” He paused a moment as the warrior considered his words and because he feared he might not get the answer he wanted he added, “Or we can stare at the wastes around us and listen to the sound of the wind. I thought an exchange of stories might be more interesting.”

       Tusk nodded. “I agree.” He called out in his language—Merros understood the words sometimes, and just then did not; he suspected they were speaking different languages, only some of which understood. He was not mistaken—and three other riders came closer, moving to nearly surround Merros. They did not come with harmful intent. They merely came because they had been commanded.

       “Our friend Merros would like to hear how the Blasted Lands came to be. Which of you will tell him?” He looked to Merros and shrugged. “I do not tell stories well. I am not patient enough to tell them properly.”

       Drask Silver Hands was riding on the other side of Merros and he roared laughter at that. “Do you hear? Great Tusk even bores himself!” They all laughed, even Tusk. That was a good thing in Merros’s eyes as he was currently stuck between the two men and had no desire to become the battlefield upon which they settled their differences. Tusk was a giant and Drask not much smaller. Worse, he had seen Drask fight and kill with terrifying efficiency.

       “Swech!” Drask called to the rider at the front of them, a female with a thick mane of gray hair pulled into a tight knot at the top of her head. The resulting tail swayed with every move her mount made. She looked over her shoulder. Her eyes, like the eyes of all of Sa’ba Taalor, glowed. Still, Merros found the shape of her eyes enchanting. Too long without companionship, perhaps, but he liked the woman.

       She gripped the saddle of her mount and spun herself around so that she faced Merros and the other riders. Most of the soldiers he knew would have promptly fallen flat on their asses had they tried that from the back of a horse, but she managed it with seemingly no effort, despite her armor and furs.

       “Yes?” Her voice was higher than he expected.

       “You have a way with stories,” Drask answered. “You should tell Merros how the Blasted Lands came to be.”

       She nodded her head and leaned toward him across the back of her saddle. For that moment in time her eyes seemed only to see him.

       “It was a long time ago,” she started….

***

It was a long time ago, before the Seven Forges rose from the ground and before your Fellein Empire existed. It was because of the Cataclysm that your empire exists at all.

Everything changed when the Blasted Lands were shaped. That is always the way with great events. When they happen the world is never quite the same.

Back then all that you see around you was alive. There were great plains of green grass and there were farms and herds of animals, but more than that, there was the sea and there was Korwa. Korwa was a mighty city. According to some of the gods it was the greatest city that ever was.

What? No, not all of the gods say that. The Daxar Taalor do not agree on all things at all times. If they did there would only be one god, yes? Why would there be seven gods if they all thought alike? But some of them say Korwa was the greatest city there ever was.

All the gods agree upon is this: Korwa was magnificent. Towers of steel and stone and crystal rose high into the sky, as high as the tops of the Seven Forges themselves. The city rested on a sea of blue waters and vast bridges ran across the waters to let visitors in.

Korwa was the heart of the first empire, you see. The home of most peoples.

But sometimes the best of things become the most treasured. And what is treasured most is often coveted. Who can say what makes a people jealous? A man or a woman might desire the love of one who is already spoken for. Or perhaps a piece of land, or a trinket is all that is required. In the case of a people there must surely be better reasons but those are lost now, as lost as great Korwa. Whatever the reasons, the people from outside the empire became jealous of the power and beauty that Korwa offered and so they decided to take it.

We do not know all of the details. We only know what we have been told. But I will tell you what I can. The soldiers of Korwa were very skilled, but they were outnumbered, for the people who sought to take the city came from many directions. It might be that there was more than one group, or that the group was very large. We know that the leaders were called the Overlords and they were very hungry.  They came from the north and the east, and sailed across the sea in mighty ships. When they arrived, the ships let out thousands of soldiers and the weapons the Overlords created to either take Korwa as their own or to destroy the city.

Yes, that is correct. They planned to own Korwa or make sure that no one else would ever own it. No it does not make sense. On this we agree.

There were more threats. Korwa was home to the empire, yes, the seat of power, but the empire itself was vast and from within it came another threat. A country that was small and wanted to be bigger began conquering neighboring lands and then grew greedy. The people of that country were hungry, you see. They wanted all that they could have and they would not stop until even great Korwa was theirs.

The king of that land was related to the Empress of Korwa. That much is known. Beyond that, the gods do not agree. The country was called Felleis. Yes, much like your own empire, which rose from the ashes of Korwa. I suspect you already know this. But this is the story you wanted to hear. Now stop asking so many questions.

The old empire and the new empire. Together they might have stopped the Overlords. They did not fight together. They fought as enemies on the battlefield. It was while they were already engaged that the Overlords came to attack. Korwa looked to the south and did not cast their gaze far enough to the north to notice until it was too late.

The siege of Korwa was violent and very sudden. While the two armies fought the Overlords brought in their soldiers and attacker with great siege engines designed to knock down walls and warriors alike. They did not make demands. They merely attacked. Perhaps their plan was to injure and then demand surrender. Perhaps they merely wished to cause death. No one can know any longer.

The rulers of Korwa fought back. Though they were already in a war, they prepared for more battles. They had supplies and they had ships of their own. The great fleet of Korwa rode into the sea and fleets met and fought, and burned and died. “The sea was red with blood and fire,” that is what the god Wheklam said. Sailors died and no one had a chance to find their bodies. The war was too violent and the creatures of the sea feasted well.

I see the look on your face. Ask your question, Merros Dulver. Of course I know what ships are. Of course I know of navies and combat on the sea. Wheklam is the god of the sea. We have to travel to find the waters, but we know of them. Did you cross an ocean to get here? Yet you know of ships? And is this because you travel on them constantly? No? Good. Now let me go back to my story.

The war raged for almost a full year. The armies of the empires fought along the bridges leading to Korwa as the new forced the old back to the city. And even as they retreated to the city, the same empire had to fight against the attackers from the north. They tried their military methods and they were failing.

And as is often the case, the Empress turned to sorcery for her salvation. She called upon the greatest wizards of her empire to come to her and assist and they came, because the Empress was well loved by her people and because they wanted to live. They all wanted to live.

The spellcasters did what it is that they do. We do not have sorcerers in Taalor. We have gods. They react differently to these things, I suppose. Whatever the case, the mages gathered their powers and fought against the enemies of the Empress. The warships of the Overlords were pushed aside by waves that sank them and then swallowed the crews whole.  The sea grew redder and the creatures of the sea grew fatter.

And while the wizards cast their spells they turned to the new empire and sought to destroy the armies of the usurpers. When soldiers fell they did not stay fallen. The dead rose from the pits where they were buried and they attacked the living, and for each that fell before them another soldier was born, lifted from death and forced to fight for the sorcerers of Korwa.

Once a weapon has been used, it cannot be unused. That is what Truska-Pren says. And he is a god, he should know. The Overlords were powerful magicians as well, and they set aside their navies and their soldiers and they began casting mighty sorceries of their own. They brought forth storms to shatter the ground. Fingers of air raked the earth bare, and lightning dazzled the eyes of all who lived within Korwa, until the sun seemed but a faint glimmer in comparison. The war machines of the Overlords were frightening things, but their wizardry was far greater.

Through it all, Korwa stood, the walls damaged but not destroyed, the people wounded but not driven down. The Empress waited in her tower and spoke to the wizards and made demands of them and they in turn obeyed her, for they loved her and wished to serve her until the very end.

It is not certain what happened next. Three gods have spoken of this and I will tell you what each has said, because each is a part of the greater truth. Even gods cannot see everything, or if they can, they cannot see with the same eyes.

Paedle, who only ever whispers, tells us that the Empress was driven mad. All that she had worked for was taken from her. Her husband and consorts killed, her children burned and broken by the lightning. Paedle says that the Empress demanded the greatest vengeance ever, a fire so vast that it would destroy all of the empire’s enemies. Perhaps that is so. Perhaps the wizards managed their feat.

Durhallem the Wounder says that the Overlords carried out their promise. If they could not have the jewel of Korwa, then no one could. And so they summoned the elements to shatter the island where Korwa rested and watched as the city that everyone wanted was felled like a tree. It is his claim that the new empire was so angry at the Overlords that they then sought to destroy them and in time they succeeded.

All I can say for certain is that the Overlords are no more.

Wrommish, who many say watches best of all the Daxar Taalor, said that both stories have some truth, but are merely singular sides to a jewel of many facets. There were enchantments on all sides and they came together as wind and fire can merge to become something greater and more destructive.

Here is what we know.  Great Korwa fell and the oceans burned away. Vast armies were joined in combat across the land where we now walk and they were destroyed in one day. From time to time we still find pieces of the Old Empire and I have heard from your own people that some have come here in the past seeking treasures lost in the Cataclysm.

Where once there were fields and pastures of green there is now dust. The animals raised here are ashes and the orchards are ice. The people of Korwa are gone and when the winds are soft enough you can look down into the ground beneath us, through the glass that once was dirt and buildings, and you can see their bodies, broken and forgotten.

The war machines are lost. They are buried with Korwa, though from time to time you can hear the sounds of the great engines. That is what Wrommish says. Those vast devices and the remains of Korwa are locked together now, and they have become something we cannot know, we must not know. They have become the Mounds.

From life we have been given death. From peace we have been given war. From water we have been given ashes and disease. That is the legacy of Great Korwa and the peoples who coveted her beauty.

***

       Merros took a deep breath and shook his head. At the end he had lost himself in Swech’s words and the meter of her voice. She was a gifted storyteller.

       He looked to the west and saw the vast shapes of the Mounds and heard from deep within them the sounds of things that should not be.

       “Have your people ever been to the Mounds?”

       Swech shook her head. “That is forbidden by the gods.”

       “Can you tell me about the Overlords?”

       It was Tusk who answered, his voice gruff and his tone commanding. “No.” Merros turned to look at the man and found him staring back with narrowed eyes. Perhaps it was the wind that caused the sullen look. Perhaps it was something else. Either way Tusk made sure that everyone knew his position. “That is enough stories for one day. Later perhaps we will tell more. Tales and fables should be rationed, like all supplies.”

       When he looked around Drask and Tusk were both moving away, calling out to each other in a tongue he could not understand.

       Swech stayed where she was a moment longer before once more turning herself in the saddle of her mount and then riding away. 

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Apr
22

Angry Robot Live!

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Dear Robot Readers,

Mike Underwood, Sales & Marketing-o-Tron here with some cool news.

I love conventions – they’re a chance to bring together authors to discuss interesting, important, and/or irreverent topics in writing and cross-pollinate ideas and experiences. Not to mention the amazing, off-the-wall conversations that happen in the hallways, restaurants, and the bars. Especially the bars.

I’m also a podcaster, and a while back, I wanted to apply the fun of podcasting to my marketing work with Angry Robot and see if there was a way to bring some of the amazing convention-style conversations to readers around the world without having to shell out for a convention pass or a plane ticket. Which leads directly to…

Angry Robot Live.

Monday, April 28th, at 8:30PM EDT, I’m going to moderate a live Google+ discussion with four critically-acclaimed Angry Robot authors about 21st Century Science Fiction. Our panelists will be:

Madeline Ashby, John W. Campbell-nominated author of the Kitschie and Locus-nominated vN
Cassandra Rose Clarke, author of PKD-nominated The Mad Scientist’s Daughter
Ramez Naam, John W. Campbell-nominated author of the Promethus, Kitschie, and Arthur C. Clarke-nominated Nexus, and the Prometheus-nominated Crux
Wesley Chu, John W. Campbell-nominated author of the Alex Award-winning The Lives of Tao.

If you have questions about Science Fiction or any of these authors works that you’d like me to ask at the panel, please comment below. And be on the lookout for the link to join the discussion live on Monday the 28th!

For those who won’t be able to attend live, we’ll record the panel to be uploaded to YouTube, as well as archiving it on Google+ for viewing long into the 21st Century.

 

UPDATED: RSVP here for a chance at book giveaways!

author headshot for Cassandra Rose Clarke

Cassandra Rose Clarke

Ramez Naam Author headshot

Ramez Naam

Author headshot for Madeline Ashby

Madeline Ashby

 

 

Author headshot for Wesley Chu

Wesley Chu

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Categories : Angry Robot, Events, Free
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Back in February Andy Remic offered a free Wolf Pack to reviewers and bloggers who had reviewed his fantastic fantasy novel The Iron Wolves.

The pack included a lollypop, five bookmarks, a signed photo and an Iron Wolves t-shirt! (Modelled very impressively at the time by Mr Remic himself).

Wolf Pack Promo

Now the Wolf Pack has begun to return to their leader (with bloggers and reviewers receiving their t-shirts) and we can bring you first photo of one being worn by someone who didn’t write the book: Phil Witvliet of Grimdark reader with his dog Pluto!

Phil Witvliet & Pluto - wolf pack

Hopefully we’ll see more wolves returning home in the future so we can bring you photos of the entire pack, but for now we think Phil and Pluto set a high bar for the others!

*Once again we use the term “Modelled” in the broadest possible sense*

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Feb
06

Remic’s Wolf Pack (grr)

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Reviewers: Get Your FREE Wolf Pack!

The Wolf Pack (grr) is now ready to (run with the pack/howl at the moon/scratch at the fleas etc). If you’re a blogger or reviewer who has reviewed Andy Remic‘s brand new fantasy novel, The Iron Wolves, you are eligible for a FREE Wolf Pack (grr) which comprises a t-shirt* (sizes L and XL), five bookmarks, a signed photograph of the author and a lollypop. There are limited stocks of t-shirts though, so please email Andy ASAP at andyremic [at] outlook.com linking to your review.
*Model not included.**

** Well, he might be, for the right price (he likes bananas).***

*** We stress the word “model” is used in its broadest possible sense.

Wolf Pack Promo

Categories : AR Authors, Free, Reviews
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total-film-magazine-4367-a-1389784791-470-75January’s issue of Total Film not only features on-set exclusives for Spider-Man 2, interviews with Colin Farrell, and reviews of The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug but excitedly, there is a FREE eBook of Ramez Naam‘s Nexus for every reader!

In 2013, the screen rights to Nexus, Ramez’s nanotech mind-control novel, were acquired by Paramount Pictures, with the project to be produced by Mary Parent and Cale Boyter through their Disruption label and Darren Aronofsky and Scott Franklin through their Protozoa banner. Rights acquisitions don’t always mean the movie will come to fruition, but with such fantastic names involved, it’s worth celebrating again!

Lucky Total Film readers can also download copies of Exhibit A‘s Scare Me by Richard Parker which was bought by Relativity Media with Wentworth Miller adapting the novel for the big screen, AND Strange Chemistry‘s Blackwood by Gwenda Bond which MTV has put in development, from Lionsgate Television and Kelsey Grammer’s Grammnet Prods.

Have you read these books? Did you know about their TV/movie potentials? Pick up a copy of this month’s Total Film - either online on Apple or here’s where you can order your print copy - and find out how to download your free copy of these books!

total-film-magazine-4367-a-1389955247-470-75

Jan
07

David Tallerman’s Prince Thief – sample

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Prince Thief, by David TallermanThat David Tallerman is a busy chap. As well as building a brand spanking new website (and there’s some free fiction there, too), he’s put together a free sample of his latest novel, Prince Thief.

Click here to visit the main site, or here to read the free sample of Prince Thief (and you really should!)

Prince Thief is the third in the Tales of Easie Damasco series.

.
About Prince Thief

Altapasaeda, capital of the Castoval, is under siege by its own King.

Far to the north, rebels have set a bastard prince up as a figurehead.

Yet again, Easie Damasco finds himself roped into a desperate scheme to preserve the Castoval, And kidnapping the Prince seemed like such a good idea at the time…

Categories : AR Authors, Free
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Dec
25

And so this is Christmas…

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Well, we’ve had a great 2013, so far (still a week to go!) but here’s a round-up of our 12 Days of Christmas blogs – and don’t forget, you can pick up ebook copies of all of our featured authors for one shiny UK pound! (About US$1.33). See the authors blog posts below, for details of this offer.

The Staff blogs:

Vicky’s Christmas Advent Calendar

Abi’s Secret Santa Christmas

Lee’s Best of the Year

Wanda – Chanumas

Suzannah – The Best Christmas Film Ever (That’s not the name of the film, by the way)

The Author blogs:

Karen Sandler – On the 1st Day of Christmas, it was Hanukkah

Julianna Scott – 12 Days of Christmas

Joseph D’Lacey – A Christmas Donkey

Wesley Chu – Christmas Blog

Laura Lam – Winter Holidays in Ellada

Madeline Ashby – a Very vN xMas

William Sutton – A Shilling Shocker Short Story

Kim Curran – Summoning Santa

John Matthews – Christmas Blog Post

Sean Lynch – Christmas Reflections

Cassandra Rose Clarke – Midnight Mass

Chuck Wendig – Christmas is Death

We hope you have the best {insert your favoured holiday break of choice here} you’ve ever had, and here’s to a fantastic 2014!

 

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Dec
12

Festive Competition

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Hey everyone!

Amanda, Vicky and I have just decorated the office, and as the silly season hits the AR HQ, we’d like to offer you the change to share in our festive excitement. We’ve got a great competition for you…and the prizes are here, in our tree:

photo

Read More→

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Nov
28

Team Robot Blogger Award: The Winners!

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The Winners

 

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Well done to all our short-listed blogs, and those nominated by the authors. But we can only have one winner for each award, and here they are: Read More→

Nov
28

Team Robot Blogger Award

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As most of you are probably aware, we here at Robot HQ adore our blogs, bloggers, readers of blogs, and all things related. We really appreciate everything they do to help us promote our books, authors, and indeed Angry Robot, Strange Chemistry, and Exhibit A. With today being Thanksgiving, we thought it was the perfect time to announce our Team Robot Blogger Award. We want to give back to those bloggers who work tirelessly, for no financial gain, and in their own free time, to read more books than we can even publish, and spread the word to the reading – and buying – public. Read More→

The Age Atomic, by Adam Christopher, The Marching Dead, Lee Battersby and Black Feathers by Joseph D’Lacey are all officially on-sale in the UK/EU next week (from Thursday 6th to be precise), but are already our in US/CAN print and ebook editions.

Here’s a taster from each to whet your appetite for more…

Click on the widgets below to activate them and read a free sample from each book, or use the links beneath each widget to visit issuu.com, where you’ll find sharing buttons, embed code, links and all sorts, should you wish to add any or all of these extracts to your own blog or website.

 

The Age Atomic

by Adam Christopher

The sequel to Empire State – the superhero-noir fantasy thriller set in the other New York.

The Empire State is dying. The Fissure connecting the pocket universe to New York has vanished, plunging the city into a deep freeze and the populace are demanding a return to Prohibition and rationing as energy supplies dwindle.

Meanwhile, in 1954 New York, the political dynamic has changed and Nimrod finds his department subsumed by a new group, Atoms For Peace, led by the mysterious Evelyn McHale.

As Rad uncovers a new threat to his city, Atoms For Peace prepare their army for a transdimensional invasion. Their goal: total conquest – or destruction – of the Empire State.


Read, download, share and embed via Issuu.com

 

Black Feathers

by Joseph D’Lacey

It is the Black Dawn, a time of environmental apocalypse, the earth wracked and dying.

It is the Bright Day, a time long generations hence, when a peace has descended across the world.

In each era, a child shall be chosen. Their task is to find a dark messiah known only as the Crowman. But is he our saviour – or the final incarnation of evil?


Read, download, share and embed via Issuu.com

 

The Marching Dead

by Lee Battersby

Find the dead a King, save himself, win the love of his life, live happily ever after. No wonder Marius dos Helles is bored. But now something has stopped the dead from, well, dying.

It’s up to Marius, Gerd, and Gerd’s not-dead-enough Granny to journey across the continent and put the dead back in the afterlife where they belong.


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As it’s the season of good will and all that jazz, we thought we’d give you an early present in the form of another two free samples, this time from our February 2013 releases.

The Mad Scientist’s Daughter by Cassandra Rose Clarke is a stand-alone tale of love, loss and robotics. And She Returns From War by Lee Collins is the second Cora Oglesby weird western, sequel to The Dead of Winter.

Both books will be on-sale in the UK/EU from February 7th next year and in the US/CAN and ebook from January 29th.

Click on the widgets below to activate them, or use the links beneath to visit issuu.com, where you’ll find sharing buttons, embed code, links and all sorts, should you wish to add any or all of these extracts to your own blog or website.

 

The Mad Scientist’s Daughter

by Cassandra Rose Clarke

“Cat, this is Finn. He’s going to be your tutor.”

He looks and acts human, though he has no desire to be. He was programmed to assist his owners, and performs his duties to perfection. A billion-dollar construct, his primary task now is to tutor Cat. As she grows into a beautiful young woman, Finn is her guardian, her constant companion… and more.

But when the government grants rights to the ever-increasing robot population, however, Finn struggles to find his place in the world.

Following her acclaimed Young Adult debut for our sister imprint Strange Chemistry, The Assassin’s Curse, the very talented Cassandra Rose Clarke moves on to more adult themes, in a heartbreaking story of love, loss … and robots.

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She Returns From War

by Lee Collins

Four years after the horrific events in Leadville, a young woman from England, Victoria Dawes, sets into motion a series of events that will lead Cora and herself out into the New Mexico desert in pursuit of Anaba, a Navajo witch bent on taking revenge for the atrocities committed against her people.

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Enjoy!

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It’s free samples time again! Check out these multi-chapter extracts from our three January 2013 releases: near-future science fiction thriller Nexus by Ramez Naam, Elizabethan swashbuckling and skullduggery saga The Merchant of Dreams by Anne Lyle and the three-in-one omnibus edition of the steampunk extravaganza The Bookman Histories by World Fantasy Award winner Lavie Tidhar.

All three books will be on-sale in print in the UK/EU from January 3rd 2013, slightly earlier in the US/CAN, and in ebook from December 18th from all your favourite book retailers.

Click on the widgets below to activate them, or use the links beneath to visit issuu.com, where you’ll find sharing buttons, embed code, links and all sorts, should you wish to add any or all of these extracts to your own blog or website.

 

Nexus

by Ramez Naam

In the near future, the experimental nano-drug Nexus can link human together, mind to mind. There are some who want to improve it. There are some who want to eradicate it. And there are others who just want to exploit it.

When a young scientist is caught improving Nexus, he’s thrust over his head into a world of danger and international espionage – for there is far more at stake than anyone realizes.

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The Merchant of Dreams

by Anne Lyle

The second book in the Night’s Masque series (sequel to The Alchemist of Souls)

Exiled from the court of Queen Elizabeth for accusing a powerful nobleman of treason, swordsman-turned-spy Mal Catlyn has been living in France with his young valet Coby Hendricks for the past year.

But Mal harbours a darker secret: he and his twin brother share a soul that once belonged to a skrayling, one of the mystical creatures from the New World.

When Mal’s dream about a skrayling shipwreck in the Mediterranean proves reality, it sets him on a path to the beautiful, treacherous city of Venice – and a conflict of loyalties that will place him and his friends in greater danger than ever.

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The Bookman Histories

by Lavie Tidhar

An omnibus edition, collecting The Bookman, Camera Obscura and The Great Game.

Lizard Kings and swashbuckling pirates, secret government agencies and scuttling automata, tripods and airships.

There’s never been a series with quite so much adventure crammed between two covers!

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Enjoy!

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Our October new releases will be unleashed on the world in just a couple of weeks’ time. Soon you’ll be able to head on down to your favourite bookstore (or make with the clicking on your favourite online retailer’s website) and grab a copy of The Wrong Goodbye by Chris F. Holm, Crown Thief by David Tallerman and the three-volume omnibus edition of The Knights of Breton Court by Maurice Broaddus. Once you have them safely in-hand (or on-reader) you can scamper off to your reading-cave and devour them without pause, snarling like a cornered wolverine at anyone who dares to disturb your literary reverie.

A few scant weeks later, you’ll no doubt feel the uncontrollable urge to repeat the process all over again, when our November book release – The Dead of Winter, the debut horror/western novel by new talent Lee Collins – hits the shelves.

In the meantime, here are four sets of sample chapters to help whip you into a frenzy of anticipation. Feel free to share them via your social media channel of choice, or embed the widgets on your own blog or website. Just click the relevant links to Issuu.com and then either the ‘Share’ or ‘Embed’ buttons, as required.

 

October 2012

The Wrong Goodbye, by Chris F. HolmCrown Thief, by David TallermanThe Knights of Breton Court, by Maurice Broaddus

November 2012

The Dead of Winter, by Lee Collins

 

The Wrong Goodbye

by Chris F. Holm
The Collector, book two (sequel to Dead Harvest)

Meet Sam Thornton, Collector of Souls.

Because of his efforts to avert the Apocalypse, Sam Thornton has been given a second chance – provided he can stick to the straight-and-narrow.

Which sounds all well and good, but when the soul Sam’s sent to collect goes missing, Sam finds himself off the straight-and-narrow pretty quick.

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Crown Thief

by David Tallerman
The Tales of Easie Damasco, book two (sequel to Giant Thief)

From the Tales of Easie Damasco…

Meet Easie Damasco: Thief, swindler and lately, reluctant hero.

But whatever good intentions Damasco may have are about to be tested to their limits, as the most valuable – and dangerous – object in the land comes within his light-fingered grasp. Add in some suicidally stubborn giants, an old enemy with dreams of empire and the deadliest killers in two kingdoms on his heels, and Damasco’s chances of staying honest – or even just surviving – are getting slimmer by the hour.

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The Knights of Breton Court (omnibus)

by Maurice Broaddus

The Wire meets Excalibur in this stunning urban fantasy.

From the drug gangs of downtown Indianapolis, the one true king will arise.

The King Arthur myth gets dramatically retold through the eyes of street hustler King, as he tries to unite the crack dealers, gangbangers and the monsters lurking within them to do the right thing.

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The Dead of Winter

by Lee Collins

Cora and her husband hunt things – things that shouldn’t exist.

When the marshal of Leadville, Colorado, comes across a pair of mysterious deaths, he turns to Cora to find the creature responsible. But if Cora is to overcome the unnatural tide threatening to consume the small town, she must first confront her own tragic past as well as her present.

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