Author Archive

Apr
23

Cover Reveal(ed): Company Town

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Yesterday, io9 exclusively revealed the cover for Madeline Ashby‘s forthcoming (October 2014) standalone novel, Company Town. io9′s reveal also features an opinion piece by Madeline about the book, and it’s certainly worth a read – click right here to head straight to io9. But enough from me, and here is Erik Mohr’s fantastic cover for Company Town:

Company Town by Madeline Ashby

Categories : Angry Robot, Cover Art
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Apr
22

Hugo Award Nominations

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On Saturday, the Angry Robot staff members were a happy mix of chocolate-face-stuffing, Easter-con-partying, and usual-weekend-shenanigans…and then, the Hugo Award finalists were announced, and our Easter weekends got even better!

This year we have had our best showing ever with eight nominations:

• John W Campbell Award for best new writer – Wesley Chu, Ramez Naam
• Best Fancast/podcast – Emma Newman‘s “Tea & Jeopardy“, and our own Mike Underwood as part of the Skiffy & Fanty Show team
• Best Related Work – Kameron Hurley
• Best Fan Writer - Kameron Hurley
• Best Novelette (short novel/long short story) – Aliette de Bodard
• and last but definitely not least, Best Editor – Lee Harris (the first *ever* Brit to be nominated as Best Editor in the 50+ years that this award has been running) and do check out Lee’s own blog post about his nomination here and the Angry Robot nominations here

 

Congratulations to all, and roll on the London Worldcon in August, when the results will be announced.

 

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Apr
14

Guest Post: Ferrett Steinmetz

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When I was fifteen, my parents dragged me to a book release party.  Not that I knew it was a book release party; I was, like every fifteen-year-old kid, self-centered to the point that I wore my colon as a hat.  It was at the Goldsteins’ house, so I assumed it was another party celebrating the fact that brave Mrs. Goldstein had survived yet another round of brain surgery. 

But no.  Mrs. Goldstein – a clear-eyed woman who walked with the help of a cane – pressed a hardcover book into my hand.

“I wrote this,” she told me.  “About my experiences, relearning how to walk and talk and write.  It’s a memoir.”  And though I’d read so many stories that I had ink permanently dotted on my nose from sticking it in books, it had never occurred to me that actual people wrote them.  Authors were Gods who lived in little editorial heavens, flinging down books from clouds up high.

But Mrs. Goldstein had written a book.  And taken it to the publishers in New York.  And gotten it published.  She told me all about how she wrote it, how you had to send it in a manila envelope to people, the letters of rejection you’d get, and slowly I came to understand that books – books! – were written by people like you and me.

_________________________________________________________________________________________________

When I was fifteen, I vowed to publish a novel.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________

When I was nineteen, I wrote my first novel: “Schemer and the Magician.”  It was about a nerdy college kid (basically me) and a wiseass college kid (also basically me) who got kidnapped by aliens and sucked into a galactic war OF INCONCIEVABLE CONSEQUENCES.

…It wasn’t very good.

I sent it to two agents, who wisely never responded.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________

When I was twenty-three, I wrote my second novel: “A Cup of Sirusian Coffee.”  It was a Hitchhiker’s Guide To The Galaxy-style riff on the afterlife, where for all eternity you were forced to do whatever you did in life.  Were you a plumber?  Look forward to spending the next five Pleistocene epochs fixing pipes.

I wrote the first three chapters, handed them around to my college buddies, who thought it was hysterical.  So every day I cranked out another chapter, handing out printed manuscripts to a small group of fans who demanded to know what happened next, until eventually I snowballed a slim plot into a musical Ragnarok that shut the universe down.

This one I sent out to three agents, two of whom dutifully informed me that I was not quite as clever as I thought.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________

When I was thirty, I wrote my third novel: “The Autonomist Agenda, Part I.”  Screw my own muse, I thought: this one would be commercial.  So I wrote the first book in a huge and complex fantasy series, complete with smoldering relationships guaranteed to appeal to the ‘shipper crowd, and prophecies that propelled a young boy on the inevitable journey to become a Big Damn Hero, and even a gay warrior because I was Just That Ahead Of The Curve.

(Not that it was revealed he was gay until Part II.  I had Plans, you see.  I’d sell all three books at once!)

I slipped a copy to my friend Catherynne Valente, who’d had some success at this writing gig.  She read part of it, then took me out to a sad lunch at Bob Evans to break the news.

“I guess you could get this published somewhere,” she told me.  “But is this really what you want your name on?”

I guess I didn’t.

But damn, I wanted my name on something.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________

When I was thirty-two, I wrote my fourth novel: “On The Losing Side Of The Dragon.”  Sure, the knight eventually kills the dragon, but what about all those poor schmucks who get killed along the way?

I gave it to my wife.  She informed me she liked how it ended, really liked it, but the beginning was tedious.  She would never have gotten to the good stuff if she hadn’t been, you know, obligated to read my crap on account of our wedding vows consisting of the words “to love, honor, and beta-read.”

I locked myself in my room and cried all evening.  Thirteen years of effort, and I had not managed to write one single novel that anyone wanted to read.  I had not sold one story.

All I’d ever wanted to do was write novels, and I pretty much sucked at it.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________

When I was thirty-five, I wrote my fifth novel: “A Cup Of Sirusian Coffee.”  Wrote the whole goddamned thing from scratch.  It was a funny idea, and my college buddies still asked about it, so clearly I just needed to go back to the drawing board.

This was novel #5 – and that was the toughest one.  See, Stephen King, my favorite Unca Stephen, had written five novels before he sold his first one.  He’d famously wadded up Carrie and thrown it in the trash, and his wife had rescued it, put his ass back in the seat, told him to keep going.  He did.  Fame and fortune resulted.

That meant this was my lucky novel.  This was the one I was guaranteed to publish.  After all, how many novels did you have to write before you got good?

After sending the new manuscript far and wide, I heard back from a publisher two years later.  They told me the opening paragraphs were “interesting” but then it “fell apart quickly… if the author could capture the style of those first paragraphs again, it might be worth it.”

But by then, I’d pretty much given up trying.
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When I was thirty-eight, Catherynne Valente yelled at me.  “Just send in the damn application,” she said.

“I’m not a good writer,” I told her.  “The Clarion Science Fiction Writers’ Workshop is for serious writers.  I’ve sold three stories in twenty years, for $15 total.  I’m never going to get in.”

She smiled.  “So send it in.  Just to shut me up.”

I did.

I got accepted.

I got scourged.

I got to learn that over the last twenty years, I’d accreted all kinds of bad habits – lazy dialogue, flabby prose, a reliance on recreating stereotypes instead of actually writing about people I knew.  Clarion taught me that I wasn’t a bad writer, I’d just been too overconfident in my raw abilities… and now that I had finally been forced to acknowledge all my weak spots, I could fix those and reinvent myself for the better.

Over the next three years, I sold fourteen stories, five of them at professional rates.  For which I still thank Catherynne.

But I wasn’t quite ready to write a novel.  Not yet.
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When I was forty-one, I finally got the courage back to work on my sixth novel: a sweeping science-fiction epic called “The Upterlife.”  I spent a year revising it, and – I shit you not – not two hours after I finished the final draft of that damn novel, Mary Robinette Kowal called me up to tell me that my novelette Sauerkraut Station had been nominated for the Nebula Award.

If that wasn’t a signal from God that I was ready to sell a damn novel, what was?  I sent that manuscript to all the best agents, with a killer query, telling them by way, I’m up for a Nebula this year and I just happen to have this novel for you.

They all rejected it.

Every.

Last.

One.
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When I was forty-three, I wrote my seventh novel.  It was Breaking Bad with magic, a desperate bureaucromancer turned to manufacturing enchanted drugs to save his burned daughter, and it was by far the best thing I’d ever written.  I polished that sucker until it shined.  It shined.

But I was two novels beyond Stephen King.  I’d been struggling to get a novel published for twenty-four years now, clawing at the walls of the Word Mines, and I had no hope of anything but oh God I couldn’t stop and I realized that I wasn’t going to stop, that the breath in my body would run out before I stopped writing tales and who the hell cared if I got published or not I was locked in.  I had to create.  I had to.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________

And I sold it.
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Flex, by Ferrett Steinmetz.  The story of Paul Tsabo, bureaucromancer, his daughter Aliyah, and the kinky videogamemancer Valentine DiGriz, who I’m pretty sure you’re gonna love.  Published by Angry Robot books – the very publisher of whom I said to my wife, “If I could have any publisher take my first book, it’d be Angry Robot.”

Coming to bookstores on September 30th.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________

I don’t care what novel you’re on.

Do not give up.

We are excited to announce Ferrett Steinmetz has joined the ranks as an Angry Robot author. Signed from Evan Gregory (Ethan Ellenberg Literary Agency) the World English deal is for two books. The first of those, Flex, will be published in October, 2014. Ferrett is a Nebula-nominated author whose blog post “Dear Daughter: I Hope You Have Awesome Sex” went viral in 2013.

Angry Robot author Ferret SteinmetzFerrett Steinmetz: “When I was shopping this novel around, I told my wife ‘If I could pick any publisher, I’d choose Angry Robot.  They’re smart, I like their books, and they care about their authors.’  And lo!  I hit the jackpot.  And now I do the Snoopy dance of happiness.”

To read more about

Amanda Rutter: “I have always enjoyed fantastic urban fantasy and reading Ferrett’s book gave me a shiver because I knew this was a really exceptional example of the genre. It’s geeky, imaginative and just plain fun, with a nod and a wink to popular culture that made me grin as I read. I can’t wait for other people to explore his world.”

Flex: 

A desperate father will do anything to heal his daughter in a novel where Breaking Bad meets Jim Butcher’s Dresden Files 

FLEX. Distilled magic in crystal form.  The most dangerous drug in the world.  Snort it, and you can create incredible coincidences to live the life of your dreams.

FLUX:  The backlash from snorting Flex.  The universe hates magic and tries to rebalance the odds; maybe you survive the horrendous accidents the Flex inflicts, maybe you don’t.

PAUL TSABO: The obsessed bureaucromancer who’s turned paperwork into a magical Beast that can rewrite rental agreements, conjure rented cars from nowhere, track down anyone who’s ever filled out a form.  But when all of his formulaic magic can’t save his burned daughter, Paul must enter the dangerous world of Flex dealers to heal her.  Except he’s never done this before – and the punishment for brewing Flex is army conscription and a total brain-wipe.

About Ferrett: After being bitten by a radioactive writing bug at the 2008 Clarion Writer’s Workshop, Ferrett Steinmetz unlocked the ability to scale previously impossible publishing walls. Since 2008, his work has appeared in Asimov’s, Apex, Intergalactic Medicine Show, Shimmer, and Escape Pod among many other publications, and in 2011 was nominated for a Nebula for his novelette, “Sauerkraut Station.” He lives in Cleveland with the best wife in the world, a small black dog of indeterminate origin, and a friendly ghost.  He blogs about puns, politics, and polyamory at his blog www.theferrett.com, and can be found Tweetering at @ferretthimself.

Categories : Angry Robot, AR Authors
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SF Signal have exclusively revealed the brilliant cover of Carrie Patel‘s The Buried Life, wonderfully created by John Coulthart. They also have 3 copies (ebook or physical, winner’s choice!) of The Buried Life to give away; to enter, go to SF Signal for all the entry details.

 

The Buried Life by Carrie Patel

 

TheBuriedLife-144dpiThe gaslight and shadows of the underground city of Recoletta hide secrets and lies. When Inspector Liesl Malone investigates the murder of a renowned historian, she finds herself stonewalled by the all-powerful Directorate of Preservation – Recoletta’s top-secret historical research facility.

When a second high-profile murder threatens the very fabric of city society, Malone and her rookie partner Rafe Sundar must tread carefully, lest they fall victim to not only the criminals they seek, but the government which purports to protect them. Knowledge is power, and power must be preserved at all costs…

US & Ebook: 29 July 2014

UK & ROW: 7 August 2014

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Apr
03

SFX: Get Your Free AR ebooks!

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SFX247_cover_digi-610x783The lovely folks over at SFX have teamed up with us angrier people and together we’re delighted to bring you TWO free ebooks!

In case you didn’t notice with all our earlier celebrations, we’re pretty proud of reaching our 100th book release – Adam Christopher‘s Hang Wire, and we’re rounding this out with an exclusive offer for all SFX readers.

To get your free copy of Empire State by Adam Christopher and/or (hey, why not get both of them!) Zoo City by Lauren Beukes, follow the instructions in your copy of this month’s SFX.

And funny how I just happen to have some links to hand to help you pick up your copy of SFXPrint version and iPad version.

This free ebook offer is valid until 30th April, and is open to readers worldwide. The ebooks are available in epub and mobi formats.

SFX_247_twitter2 (1)

In all its glory (no, I won’t paste the redeeming instructions):

For tweeting etc

ALL the award nominations. We want them ALL.

Ramez Naam Ramez Naam is certainly doing his best to bring them to us. We recently had Nexus  in The Golden Tentacle category at the Kitschies, and Nexus is also shortlisted for the soon-to-be-announced Arthur C. Clarke Award. We are delighted to now announce that both Nexus AND Crux have been shortlisted for the Prometheus Award for Best Novel.

Here’s the full shortlist:

Homeland, by Cory Doctorow (TOR Books)
A Few Good Men, by Sarah Hoyt (Baen Books)
Crux, by Ramez Naam (Angry Robot Books)
Nexusby Ramez Naam (Angry Robot Books)
Brilliance, by Marcus Sakey (Thomas & Mercer)

The awards will be presented during Loncon 3, the 72nd annual World Science Fiction Convention August 14-18, 2014, in London.

Congratulations to everyone shortlisted, with a special great big WOOOOT to Ramez Naam!

Crux by Ramez NaamNexus, by Ramez Naam

 

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Mar
24

New Angry Robot Author: Susan Murray!

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Angry Robot Books is excited to announce our latest acquisition, World Rights from Sam Copeland (Rogers, Coleridge and White Literary Agency) for Susan Murray’s The Waterborne Blade (October 2014), the opening volume of an intriguing medieval fantasy series for fans of Trudi Canavan, Karen Miller and Gail Z Martin.

Angry Robot Books is delighted to have obtained Susan’s wonderful debut novel, in which an exiled queen must protect her unborn child during a civil war by drawing on dark powers she can neither understand nor control. The as-yet untitled sequel will be released in summer of 2015.

Susan Murray: “I’m thrilled to find myself working with the dynamic team at Angry Robot. With so many talented authors on their list I imagined my novel’s chances of acceptance lay somewhere between slim and none. Never have I been more happy to be wrong.”

The Waterborne Blade:

The citadel has long been the stronghold of Highkell. All that is about to change because the traitor, Vasic, is marching on the capital. Against her better judgement, Queen Alwenna allows herself to be spirited away by one of the Crown’s most trusted servants, safe from the clutches of the throne’s would-be usurper.

Fleeing across country, she quickly comes to learn that her pampered existence has ill-equipped her for survival away from the comforts of the court. Alwenna must toughen up, and fast, if she is even to make it to a place of safety. But she has an even loftier aim – for after dreaming of her husband’s impending death, Alwenna knows she must turn around and head back to Highkell to save the land she loves, and the husband who adores her, or die in the attempt.

But Vasic the traitor is waiting. And this was all just as he planned.

Susan Murray photo 11 3 14About Susan: After spending her formative years falling off ponies Susan moved on to rock climbing, mountains proving marginally less unpredictable than horses. Along the way she acquired a rugby-playing husband, soon followed by two daughters and a succession of rundown houses. Cumulative wear and tear prompted her to return to study, settling unfinished business with an Open University Humanities degree. She lives with her family in rural Cumbria where she writes fantasy and science fiction with occasional forays into other genres.

Welcome Susan on Twitter: @pulpthorn

 

 

Rights Queries: Please contact Rights Executive Ellena Johnstone for all rights queries: ellena.johnstone@ospreypublishing.com

Categories : AR Authors
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Mar
14

Cover Reveal: The Shadow Master

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If you’ve seen our recent hints, you’ll know we’re pretty excited about this cover and revealing it to you. Craig had some fantastic promos created, and just to tease you before the big reveal, here’s a quick peek at them again:

 

The Shadow Master

July 2014

In a land riven with plague, in the infamous Walled City, two families vie for control – the Medicis with their genius inventor Leonardo; the Lorraines with Galileo, the most brilliant alchemist of his generation.

And when two star-crossed lovers, one from either house, threaten the status quo, a third, shadowy power – one that forever seems a step ahead of all of the familial warring – plots and schemes, and bides its time, ready for the moment to attack…

TheShadowMaster-144dpi

Cover art by Steve Stone.

{ click to see the full loveliness }

Categories : Angry Robot, Cover Art
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Mar
06

Lenten Giveaway: Last God Standing

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Given up the usual sweet treats for Lent? Perhaps you’re going without social media, cigarettes, or that extra shop-bought coffee. Here’s a Lenten idea: read more books! We’re celebrating the ultimate in divine comedy with a Goodreads Giveaway for Last God Standing by Michael Boatman: 40 copies over 40 days & nights. Here’s the entry details:

Goodreads Book Giveaway

Last God Standing by Michael Boatman

Last God Standing

by Michael Boatman

Giveaway ends April 20, 2014.

See the giveaway details
at Goodreads.

Enter to win

 

Categories : Angry Robot
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Lee_yellow_sm

Angry Lee

Attention all Earthlings (and attentive extra-terrestrials),

Angry Robot is sending an ambassadorial team to the Strange and Wonderous lands of Reddit to bring the weird word of Angry Robot to the voracious and energetic readers at r/Fantasy. The Redditors call it an ‘AMA’ (Ask Me Anything).
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Led by Senior Editor Lee Harris, this two-robot team is supported by Sales & Marketing Manager Mike Underwood. The team will answer any an all questions about Angry Robot, publishing, our list, our publishing initiatives, and where Lee Harris gets his totally-smart outfits for convention awards ceremonies.
Lee_yellow_sm

Just-As-Angry Mike

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You can catch all the excitement at www.reddit.com/r/Fantasy/ later today (Tuesday, February 25th). The post will go live in the afternoon for the UK (morning for the USA).
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Additionally, Lee and Mike will answer questions live between 10 PM GMT and midnight GMT (5PM-7PM EST).
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Onward!
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(You can post your questions now, and Mike and Lee will start answering them at the times stated, above).
Categories : Angry Robot, General
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Please welcome Craig Cormick to the blog as he chats about his recent experience at the Key West Literary Seminar. Craig’s book, The Shadow Master, will be available on 24 June.

The Author, Craig CormickSo what makes a REALLY good readers/writers conference?  I’ll let you in on a terrific secret: Key West.

But first the back story: So I was looking for a top-notch literary festival or workshop to go to, to put a bit of a recharge into the writing batteries.

Number one on my list was one of the Clarion workshops – but I just couldn’t get the timing to work out for me.

Then a friend of mine, the awesome Cat Sparks, told me about the Key West Literary Seminars that she had attended two years ago, taking part in a workshop with Margaret Atwood.

My first reaction was, ‘Where is Key West?’ Google Maps showed me a looooong, loooong chain of islands stretching from Miami towards Cuba, all linked by a series on long bridges. (Remember that scene in the Arnie movie True Lies, with Jamie Lee Curtis trying to get out of the roof of the limo as it careened all over the place on this looooong, loooooong bridge?)Over 100 miles long, the Overseas Highway ends at Key West.

As Cat advised me – if the workshops you enroll in don’t really work out for you, they also run seminars with world-leading authors – and if the seminars don’t work out for you, well Key West is about the coolest place on the planet.

Ernest Hemingway certainly thought so, when he lived there, writing most of his books in a loft studio next to a large two-storey house that is now Key West’s number one tourist attraction.

As it turned out – the workshops were pretty good, the seminars were great and the Key West was in fact the least cool place in the USA (at least in terms of the Arctic front that swept down over all of the USA during January, stopping just short of Miami and the keys. Otherwise Key West is about as cool as it can get: gorgeous white wooden houses, roosters and cats walking freely like they own the place, bands and musicians in all the bars and bars everywhere, and most everything just a walk or bike ride away. Key West also has an annual Fantasy Festival that has to be seen to be believed. Google Fantasy Fest, but be warned to have your content filters either on or off depending on your preferences.

It wasn’t hard to see why the likes of William Gibson, Lee Child, Tess Gerritsen, John Banville, Lisa Unger and Michael Connelly fly south for the seminars.

Interestingly, although this year’s seminars had the theme of the Dark Side, concentrating on crime and thriller writing, much of the discussions and advice to authors applied across genres.

Some of the worlds of wisdom worth sharing include:

-          Hemingway’s adage of write what you know can be supplemented with make up what you don’t know (Elizabeth George)

-          Imagination is the most powerful tool we have as human beings and we must use it as much as possible (John Banville)

-          I thought, what am I if not this? (Lisa Unger on striving to make it as a writer)

-          And one of my favourite, a thought raised by Booker Prize winner John Banville in a panel discussion that wouldn’t be out of place in any Angry Robot publication:

I have this feeling that we weren’t meant for this world we live in. We are somehow living on a beautiful world not meant for us. We are the most effective virus ever released on this planet. So, the people who were meant to live on this planet, how would they have coped – these gentle earthlings – living on a world that was meant for us? – Surely they’d be extinct.

Categories : AR Authors, Guest Posts
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We are very excited to share our latest acquisition with you! The deal, for Worldwide Rights, for The Singular and Extraordinary Tale of Mirror and Goliath by Ishbelle Bee was negotiated between our Senior Editor Lee Harris and Bryony Woods of Diamond Kahn Woods. This sumptuous fairytale for adults will be published in November, with a sequel to follow in July 2015.

With a wonderful title – and by the way, the subtitle is The Peculiar Adventures of John Loveheart, ESQ – I think we need to go straight to the blurb:

The Singular and Extraordinary Tale of Mirror and Goliath
The Peculiar Adventures of John Loveheart, ESQ

In the summer of 1887 my grandfather stole a clock.
It was six feet high
and the shape of a coffin.

1888. A little girl called Mirror and her shape-shifting guardian Goliath Honeyflower are washed up on the shores of Victorian England. Something has been wrong with Mirror since the day her grandfather locked her inside a mysterious clock that was painted all over with ladybirds. Mirror does not know what she is, but she knows she is no longer human.

John Loveheart, meanwhile, was not born wicked. But after the sinister death of his parents, he was taken by Mr Fingers, the demon lord of the underworld. Some say he is mad. John would be inclined to agree.

Now Mr Fingers is determined to find the little girl called Mirror, whose flesh he intends to eat, and whose soul is the key to his eternal reign. And John Loveheart has been called by his otherworldly father to help him track Mirror down…

Izzy Doel photo (1)Ishbelle: “I am over the moon to be working with Lee Harris and the Angry Robot team. Mirror and Goliath  is in excellent hands.”

Lee: “Finding Mirror and Goliath in my reading list was a dream come true – it was one of those books that the whole team immediately fell in love with, and I can’t wait to share this one with our readers!”

Bryony: “I’m thrilled to have found such a perfect home for Mirror and Goliath, and I know that Angry Robot will publish Ishbelle’s wonderful novels with all the passion and enthusiasm that they deserve.”

 And now, here’s Ishbelle:

ISHBELLE BEE writes horror and loves fairy-tales, the Victorian period (especially top hats!) and cake tents at village fêtes. (She believes serial killers usually opt for the Victoria Sponge). She currently lives in Edinburgh. She doesn’t own a rescue cat, but if she did his name would be Mr Pickles.

The Singular and Extraordinary Tale of Mirror and Goliath will be published in glorious hardback, and we’re sure will be a hit with everyone who loves fairy stories, old and young alike.

Welcome aboard, Ishbelle!

 

Categories : Angry Robot
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We know you’ve been awaiting this news, and it gives us great pleasure to announce The Rebirths of Tao will be released in January 2015. The final instalment in the Lives of Tao trilogy, this stunning conclusion will be available in ebook and the UK on 30 December 2014 and in the UK / ROW on 1 January 2015. The deal, for worldwide English rights was negotiated between Lee Harris and Chu’s agent, Russell Galen of Scovil Galen Ghosh.

The Author - Wesley ChuWesley Chu: “I am thrilled to continue the Tao series with Angry Robot Books. Together, over the past two years, the ill-tempered droids and I have  gloriously kicked the crap out of Roen and Tao, and laid waste to those human-loving Prophus. Now, it’s death, taxes, and the Genjix. People of Earth, prepare for the final battle. You’re about to get rocked.”

Lee Harris: “Roen and Tao’s story became a firm favourite as soon as we published book 1, The Lives of Tao. Book 2 confirmed Wesley’s talent, and I can’t wait to see what he has in store for us in the conclusion!”

The Rebirths of Tao

Five years have passed since the events in The Deaths of Tao. The world is split into pro-Prophus and pro-Genjix factions, and is poised on the edge of a devastating new World War. A Genjix scientist who defects to the other side holds the key to preventing bloodshed on an almost unimaginable scale.

With the might of the Genjix in active pursuit, Roen is the only person who can help him save the world, and the Quasing race, too.

And you thought you were having a stressful day…

The Lives of Tao by Wesley Chu The Deaths Of Tao by Wesley Chu

Categories : Angry Robot
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Feb
06

Remic’s Wolf Pack (grr)

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Reviewers: Get Your FREE Wolf Pack!

The Wolf Pack (grr) is now ready to (run with the pack/howl at the moon/scratch at the fleas etc). If you’re a blogger or reviewer who has reviewed Andy Remic‘s brand new fantasy novel, The Iron Wolves, you are eligible for a FREE Wolf Pack (grr) which comprises a t-shirt* (sizes L and XL), five bookmarks, a signed photograph of the author and a lollypop. There are limited stocks of t-shirts though, so please email Andy ASAP at andyremic [at] outlook.com linking to your review.
*Model not included.**

** Well, he might be, for the right price (he likes bananas).***

*** We stress the word “model” is used in its broadest possible sense.

Wolf Pack Promo

Categories : AR Authors, Free, Reviews
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