Archive for AR Authors

Dec
18

The Buried Life in Japan

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We are delighted to announce that Carrie Patel‘s sci-fi mystery The Buried Life has been sold to Japanese publisher, Tokyo Sogensha. The Buried Life has been reviewed and featured by many in most-anticipated lists and we are looking forward to its Japanese release in Spring 2016; English-language readers, The Buried Life will be with you in March of next year.

This is our second Japanese deal, after Madeline Ashby’s vN whilst agents have also sold Lavie Tidhar and Lauren Beuekes’ books to Japan. Thanks to our Rights Manager, Alex, at Watkins Media who is off to a great start with this deal with Japanese agent Tuttle Mori. As 2014 ends on a high note for Angry Robot Books with acquisitions, rights sales, and world domination plans afoot, we’re looking forward to a wonderful 2015.

vN Japan

vN

The Bookman

The Bookman

 

Camera Obscura

Camera Obscura

Zoo City-japan

Zoo City

 

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Over the past few years we’ve brought you some great 12 Days of Christmas treats and this year is no different. From tomorrow, Saturday 13 December, we will be releasing at least one book on our Robot Trading Company site at only £1 , or the currency equivalent. As we celebrate this festive ebook promotion, each day one of the selected authors will be on this site with a special guest post, whether it be a Christmas memory, family tradition, or a short story.  To redeem this offer, simply use the special code which will be featured on each day’s blog post.

In the advent calendar tradition we’re not going to tell you which authors or books have been selected, but the posts will be released at 12pm BST each day and you can find out what goodies are on offer.

We hope you enjoy these festive posts by some of your favourite authors and pick up some bargains!

Happy Christmas from all at Angry Robot HQ.

C: http://www.thedoorknobsociety.com

 

Angry Robot Books is delighted to announce the signing of a World English two-book deal with Arthur C. Clarke award-nominated Matthew De Abaitua, acquired from Sarah Such of Sarah Such Literary Agency.

The first of these two novels, If Then, is a novel in two parts, bringing the First World War to an English town of the near-future, where an economic collapse has left the citizens under the control of an algorithm known as the Process. If Then will be published in September 2015. Matthew’s second SF title, The Destructives described as Mad Men in space, will be published in 2016.

MDA author photoMatthew De Abaitua: “The disturbing contours of the future are becoming clear. Angry Robot are publishing tremendous novels that explore this strange, exciting, terrifying territory, and I’m excited that they will include my next two new novels If Then and The Destructives on that map.”

Marc Gascoigne: “I was and am a big fan of Matthew’s debut novel The Red Men, so leapt at the chance to read his new novel, If Then. I think I was about two chapters in when I knew we had to buy it for Angry Robot. Then the swine let me read the opening of The Destructives too, and of course we bought that as well. He reminds me of the very best boundary-pushers of English SF, including Christopher Priest and M John Harrison, and I’m delighted we will be bringing you his exceptional novels soon.”

About Matthew De Abaitua: Matthew lived and worked as Will Self’s amanuensis in a remote cottage in Suffolk, after he graduated with an MA in Creative Writing. His short story ‘Inbetween’ was included in the best-selling anthology Disco Biscuits and adapted as a short film by Channel 4. His first novel The Red Men (Snowbooks 2007, Gollancz ebook 2013) was shortlisted for the Arthur C Clarke Award. In 2013, the first chapter was adapted as a short film ‘Dr. Easy’ by directors Shynola (produced by Film4 and Warp Films) as a precursor to a feature film, currently in development. ‘Dr. Easy’ has had over 250k views on Vimeo. He currently lectures on Creative Writing at Brunel University and Writing Science Fiction at the University of Essex.

Reach Matthew on Twitter: @MDeAbaitua and his website: http://harrybravado.com
View Dr Easy here: http://tinyurl.com/o79wl6t

If Then

James has a scar in the back of his head. It’s where he was wounded in the Battle of Suvla Bay in August 1915. Or is the scar the mark of his implant that allows the Process to fill his mind with its own reality?

In IF, the people of a small English town cling on after an economic collapse under the protection of the Process. But sometimes people must be evicted from the town. That’s the job of James, the bailiff. While on patrol, James discovers the replica of a soldier from the First World War wandering the South Downs. This strange meeting begins a new cycle of evictions in the town, while out on the rolling downland, the Process is methodically growing the soldiers and building the weapons required to relive a long lost battle.

In THEN, it is August 1915, at the Battle of Suvla Bay in the Dardanelles campaign. Compared to the thousands of allied soldiers landing on this foreign beach, the men of the 32nd Field Ambulance are misfits and cranks of every stripe: a Quaker pacifist, a freethinking padre, a meteorologist, and the private (once a bailiff) known simply as James. Exposed to constant shellfire and haunted by ghostly snipers, the stretcher-bearers work day and night on the long carry of wounded men. One night they stumble across an ancient necropolis, disturbed by an exploding shell. What they discover within this ancient site will make them question the reality of the war and shake their understanding of what it means to be human…

Categories : Angry Reboot, AR Authors
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Not only do we have a third Gas-Lit Empire book to tell you about, but we also have an exclusive Cover Reveal for the second, Unseemly Science, over on Tor.com right now! Click here to see the cover, and below for all the new title news.

Angry Robot Books is delighted to announce the re-signing of Rod Duncan for a third book in the Gas-Lit Empire series, The Custodian of Marvels (April 2016), acquired from Ed Wilson of Johnson & Alcock.

The first in the series, The Bullet-Catcher’s Daughter, was released in September 2014 and has won the Leicester Writers’ Norman King Award as well as receiving rave reviews from readers and reviewers alike. Unseemly Science, the much anticipated second in the series, will be published in May 2015.

Rod Duncan: “Being part of the Angry Robot family has been a joy, so I am delighted to be signing up with them for the third novel in the series. Significant secrets will be revealed in this book. I can also promise a daring crime. But this time it’s Elizabeth, our protagonist, who’s going to be committing it.”

Marc Gascoigne: “In Elizabeth Barnabus, as readers of The Bullet-Catcher’s Daughter have already discovered, Rod Duncan has created a wonderfully engaging and resourceful heroine, and in the Gas-Lit Empire a tremendous alternative version of English history. Angry Robot has Unseemly Science, its miraculous sequel, on our list for Spring 15 but we couldn’t leave the story there, so I’m delighted to have snapped up another installment, The Custodian of Marvels.

The Custodian of Marvels
(The Gas-Lit Empire #3)

Elizabeth Barnabus is in hiding, outside the borders of the Gas-Lit Empire. Her late father’s nemesis, the Duke of Northampton, is using all his influence to have her arrested and ragged back to the Kingdom. To fight back against him, Elizabeth will have to put her trust in that most dangerous of men, John Farthing, agent of the dreaded Patent Office.

Praise for Rod Duncan

Chris D’Lacey: “If I had a bowler hat, I’d take it off to the author of this beautifully crafted steampunk novel.”

Graham Joyce: “Rod Duncan’s The Bullet-Catcher’s Daughter is itself a magic box pulsating with energy. Compulsive reading from the get-go, the blend of steampunk alternate history wrapped in the enigma of a chase makes for first-rate entertainment in this finely crafted novel. A superb book.”

SFX Magazine: “a breath of fresh air is the setting… It does what the very best steampunk does: it creates an alternate reality with a firm grounding in history… set against such a strikingly different, well-crafted background it’s really engaging.”

Publisher’s Weekly: “Steeped in illusion and grounded in an alternative history of the Luddite Rebellion, Duncan’s strong supernatural mystery serves ably as both a standalone adventure and the start to a series.”

Washington Post: “It’s all steampunk and circus wonder as we follow the adventures of Elizabeth Barnabas… The double crosses along the way keep the plot tight and fun, and the conclusion sets us up nicely for book two.”

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Nov
18

And the winner is…

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Guest Post: Rod Duncan, author of The Bullet-Catcher’s Daughter, on what winning an award – no matter the size – means to him.

It is a truth universally acknowledged that for every novel being written, an award acceptance speech is also being rehearsed. Novelists are, after all, professional fantasists.

“Me? Are you sure? I really didn’t expect this…”

There are a LOT of words in a novel. No matter how bad the story, the only way you can keep writing to the end is by deluding yourself that it is a gift to global culture. Punters will be grateful to hand over their hard earned cash for the privilege of owning a copy. These aren’t just words – they’re footprints in the sands of time. Of course you’re going to get an award.

“I’d like to thank my English teacher, who spurred me on by telling the class I wouldn’t amount to anything…”

The mind of the novelist is a paradoxical place. As well as being home to this almost pathological narcissism, it is a nest of venomous self-doubts. In the mid-watches of the night you wake with the conviction that all your pathetic scribblings are doomed to failure. Your prose is purple. That plot line at the core of your novel – you subconsciously copied it from an episode of Dr Who. And your grammar! You should have listened to your English teacher after all.

Or is that just me?

Nowhere is this impossible balance of opposite emotions more vividly experienced than at the awards ceremony, itself the focus of hopes and fears. Having consumed a sumptuous meal, which now lies curdling in your stomach, you silently contemplate your chances. It’s not going to be me. Though my book is really good. So it might be me. It should be me. Unless my book is bad and I hadn’t noticed. I’ve just realised that my book is terrible. It’s not going to be me. You continue with this neurosis spin-cycle until the moment arrives and you find yourself staring with a concrete smile at the envelope in the hands of the host.

“The winner is…”

…the other guy. At all costs don’t let the disappointment show. There are cameras pointing at you and everything is HD these days.

But if you do win, it is de rigueur to clutch hands to chest as if in surprise. Then humbly approach the microphone and deliver that acceptance speech you’ve been rehearsing since writing the opening lines of the novel X years ago.

In 2003, I was lucky enough to be shortlisted for the John Creasey Dagger – an international award given for the best debut crime novel in the English language. (Note: when an author says “lucky” in this context it means: “I worked damn hard for that and richly deserved it.”) I didn’t get the prize, though there were only three of us on the shortlist, so it felt like a podium finish.

I found myself in the running for another award that year, for the same novel. And at the second time of asking, I was lucky enough (sic) to win. The Norman King Award for Novel Writing was named in memory of a tutor who taught creative writing in the Adult Education College in Leicester back in the 1950s. Though it is a strictly local affair, the award is taken seriously. There is a meal, followed by speeches. And there is a trophy, resplendent on a wooden plinth. The engraved names of previous winners go back over 50 years, adding historical gravity to the honour.

Last Thursday, the Leicester award ceremony came around again. And I am delighted to report that I found myself being presented with the Norman King award once more – this time for my novel The Bullet Catcher’s Daughter.

As I lined up to have my photograph taken with winners of other prizes, it occurred to me that literary awards really do matter. Even the small ones. Because clutching that trophy, I found all the self-doubt and narcissism melting away. Having someone else say “I value your work” means that, for a time, neither extreme is needed.

Now, where did I put that speech? Ah yes. “I’d like to thank my publisher…”

With thanks to Jacob Ross for the photos!

Categories : AR Authors, Awards
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We are delighted to announce that Wesley Chu, author of the award-winning Lives of Tao series, has signed on for three new science fiction novels in an Angry Robot Books record six-figure deal.

The World English deal, signed with agent Russell Galen, is for Wesley’s new standalone series starting with The Rise of Io, publishing in August 2016. Although The Rise of Io is set in the same warring Genjix and Prophus universe as the Lives of Tao books, this brand new series will open the Quasing world to new readers as well as fans of the hugely successful Lives of Tao books.

The new trilogy picks up eight years on from the events of The Rebirths of Tao, the conclusion of Chu’s current series, which will be published by Angry Robot in April 2015. For more detailed information on The Rise of Io, click through to the book’s page here.

WesleyChuFINAL-9559 copyWesley Chu: “Batteries recharged. OS upgraded. Sharks with frigging lasers fed. It’s time to kick some ass! When I first made my strategic alliance with the metal overlords to take over the world, I didn’t think humanity stood a chance. Now with Watkins Media joining the team, victory is inevitable! Still dibs on New Zealand!”

Marc Gascoigne: “Wesley Chu’s Tao series has been a runaway success for Angry Robot, and we’re delighted that he has re-signed for us for this brand new trilogy of novels. He manages to combine lofty science fiction themes with pure Hollywood pacing, and quite frankly his novels just rock. With Angry Robot recently moving to new owners, Watkins Media Ltd, we’re delighted to have the resources to take Wes’ sales to a whole new level. His world domination is now only a matter of time.”

About Wesley Chu: Wesley Chu’s best friend is Michael Jordan, assuming that best friend status is earned by a shared television commercial. If not, then his best friend is his dog, Eva, who he can often be seen riding like a trusty steed through the windy streets of Chicago. In 2014, Wesley Chu was shortlisted for the John W Campbell Best New Writer Award. His debut, The Lives of Tao, earned him a Young Adult Library Services Association Alex Award and a Science Fiction Goodreads Choice Award Finalist slot. The sequel, The Deaths of Tao, continues the story of secret agent Roen Tan and his sarcastic telepathically bonded alien, Tao. Chu has two books scheduled for 2015: The Rebirths of Tao from Angry Robot plus Time Salvager from Tor.

Wes took the time to talk further about the deal with Aidan Moher over at A Dribble of Ink.

Reach Wesley Chu on Twitter: @wes_chu and his website: www.chuforthought.com

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Oct
23

Alyc Helms: Achievement Unlocked

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Yesterday we announced the exciting news that we have signed Alyc Helms as an Angry Robot author, with her debut novel – The Dragons of Heaven – due for publication in Spring of 2015. Alyc has written an insightful piece on her blog about her journey to publication which we have extracted here. For the full piece, click through to this page. Over to Alyc…

The exciting news that I’ve been sitting on since early January is that Angry Robot offered for my novel The Dragons of Heaven and an as-yet unnamed sequel, to be published in April 2015 and 2016. The initial muppet-flailing has quieted to a Fluttershy ‘yay,’ but my enthusiasm is not lessened for all of that. I’ve been riding this high for months, and I don’t think it’s going away.

However, I look at all the hard work and revision and rejection and depression and revision and rejection and depression and revision and and and… And I have to admit to myself: I got lucky.

Here’s what luck looks like to a writer:

I’ve always loved books, and I scribbled stories and poems starting when I was a kid and continuing well into my twenties: band-fic and blood-soaked vampire odes, re-hashed fairy tales and snarky swordswomen. I finished three stories, sent them out to Realms of Fantasy, got rejected, and moved on to other things. Becoming an author seemed impossible, something that had been done long ago by people I admired but not something I could ever do. I returned to school in my late twenties with the plan to become a research anthropologist, childhood dreams of being a fantasy novelist packed away alongside the Prima Ballerina thing.

I met Marie Brennan at a field school in Wales. In the evenings, when I wasn’t running a cobbled-together Changeling game for her and a few other women, Marie was writing the first draft of the book that would eventually become her first novel sale. I had met authors before, but this was the first time I met a peer who was serious about writing. Even then, and over the years as we solidified our friendship, I had no question that Marie would someday succeed as an author. It was inevitable.

Seeing her determination changed me. I had a reference point. A template. My academic work was in representation and identity, so I recognized why that was so important. If you see someone like you achieving something you thought was impossible, it renders that thing possible for you.

Becoming friends with Marie was my first lucky break. I started noodling around with fiction again. At this point, I was in grad school for anthropology and folklore. I’d spent several years thinking about the structure of stories, about representation, about cultures and cultural relativism and worldbuilding, about the intersections between gender, race, economics, and politics. I had THINGS TO SAY. I was crap at saying them, but I had some solid material to start from.

Some friends and I formed a writing group. Scat Hardcore included Marie, Mike Underwood, Darja Malcolm-Clarke,Siobhan Carroll, Emily Dare, and Ryan Markle, all of us still figuring out who the hell we were as writers and what the hell we were doing. We helped each other learn about writing, but also about the business of writing: networking, submission, rejection, markets, publication, conferences, workshops, etc. We learned how to take the craft and our dedication to it seriously. Scat Hardcore was my second lucky break. I can’t emphasize enough the value of a solid and serious writing community filled with people who are just slightly more talented, more dedicated, or more professionally focused than you.

At that time, I was still concentrating on my academic work and only writing short stories. I wrote a couple stories–I had learned from my academic writing about this thing called revision, and it turns out it can make your writing better!–but I didn’t really grok short stories. I still don’t think I’ve quite cracked how to write a good short story, even though I’ve managed to sell a few. Novels are my thing. Novels I grok. Novels are where my heart is.

Novels are a hell of a lot longer than short stories.

In 2006 I was playing in a supers tabletop game run by my friend Jason Pisano. I wanted to make a shift in the character I was playing–a legacy pulp hero with a lot of heart and no heroing experience–so I asked Jason if she could go to China to train with the ancient dragon who’d trained her grandfather. He said sure. I asked him to fill in the details for me. He looked at his stable of ten other players waiting for him to adjudicate things and told me to write it up myself and submit it for XP.

That was my next bit of luck. Along around the time my ‘little side-adventure write-up’ hit 40k words, I realized I had the longest thing I’d ever written, the seed of a novel, and I still wasn’t bored. Of course, it was a character fic. It wasn’t novel-shaped at all. Missy was unfocused as a character, and the story was based in a world owned by a large corporate gaming company. But at this point, I’d seen Marie take a seed from a gaming experience and turn it into a series of amazing novels–her Onyx Court books. I knew I could reshape The Dragons of Heaven. Read More→

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We, here at Angry Robot HQ, are simply delighted to announce Alyc Helms has joined the ranks as an Angry Robot author. In a two-book, World English, deal, Alyc was signed from Lindsay Ribar and Stefanie Diaz (Greenburger Assocs) and Anna Carmichael (Abner Stein). The first title, The Dragons of Heaven, will be published in April 2015.

alychelms-authorphoto1Alyc Helms: “I feel so lucky to join the Angry Robot family–The covers! The inside-the-covers! The authors! The staff!–I’m completely chuffed. I get to say chuffed now. It’s one of the perks.”

Marc Gascoigne: I do like it when the team bring in a novel proposal and we all devour it at a single sitting. Such was the case with the delicious The Dragons of Heaven by Alyc Helms, which we all love and cannot wait to present to you, our devoted readers. It’s another in a long line of wonderful Angry Robot books that defies categorisation without resorting to a hell of a lot of hyphens. Alright, if you insist: it’s a sort of superhero-pulp-kung fu-magician-fantasy-mystery-adventure. See what I mean?”

The Dragons of Heaven

Drawing on the legacy of Indiana Jones, Jack Burton, and The Shadow, Missy Masters is an adventure heroine for the 21st century.

“A tough, witty young woman who inherited her superhero grandfather’s powers barrels through a rollicking ‘Big Trouble in Little China’-esque tale filled with magic, monsters and wisecracks. I loved it.”
Alex Bledsoe, author of The Hum and the Shiver, on The Dragons of Heaven 

Street magician Missy Masters inherited more than the usual genetic cocktail from her estranged grandfather; she also got his preternatural control of shadow and his legacy as the vigilante hero, Mr. Mystic. Problem is, being a pulp hero takes more than a good fedora and a knack for witty banter, and Missy lacks the one thing Mr. Mystic had: experience. Determined to live up to her birthright, Missy journeys to China to seek the aid of Lung Huang, the ancient master who once guided her grandfather.

Lung Huang isn’t quite as ancient as Missy expected, and she finds herself embroiled in the politics of Lung Huang and his siblings, the nine dragon-guardians of creation. When Lung Di, Lung Huang’s brother and mortal enemy, raises a magical barrier that cuts off China from the rest of the world, it falls to the new Mr. Mystic to prove herself by taking down the barrier. But is it too great a task for a lone adventure hero?

Would you deal with the devil to save the world?

About Alyc Helms: Alyc Helms fled her PhD program in anthropology and folklore when she realized she preferred fiction to academic writing. She lives above a dive bar in the San Francisco Bay Area, where she’s a project manager for Macmillan, a freelance editor, and a volunteer copyeditor for Nightmare Magazine. In addition to writing, she dabbles in corsetry and costuming, dances Scottish Highland and Irish Ceili at Renaissance and Dickens fairs, rants about social justice issues, and games in all forms of media. She sometimes refers to her work as “critical theory fanfic,” which is just a fancy way to say that she is obsessed with liminality, gender identity, and foxes. She’s a graduate of Clarion West 2012, and her short fiction has appeared in Daily Science Fiction and Crossed Genres and will be appearing in Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet and Beneath Ceaseless Skies.

 Join us in welcoming Alyc to our motley crew: @alychelms and check out her website: http://www.alychelms.com

 

Categories : AR Authors, Books, News
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Oct
19

So, Farewell Miriam

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FarewellIf you’ve not seen the announcement elsewhere yet, the lovely Chuck Wendig has sold three new Miriam Black books to the gang over at Saga (Simon & Schuster), and the first three volumes will be joining them over there too.

This happens pretty frequently in publishing, where books change publisher, and new books in the series are released in different packaging along with the backlist, but we’ll be especially sad to see Miriam go. Back in the spring, Chuck suggested the new books for Angry Robot… just as our then-owners, Osprey Group, hit some difficulties that eventually led to the company being broken up and sold. We wanted to offer on them, oh how we pined for them, but we had strict orders from above: no new proposals could be bought at that time. Worse, the owners had also put a block on reprints of physical books, so paperback copies of Blackbirds ran out. With massive regret, and if we’re being honest deeply frustrated by the whole situation, we had to let Miriam leave the Angry Robot label that first brought her to you all.

The Miriam books remain in our catalogue until the end of the year, so obviously we’d love you to snap up copies if you haven’t yet, and do look out for those incredible new adventures from Saga – we’ve only read the synopses but they already rule. And we have to add: although we didn’t move to our fabulously supportive new owners in time to keep Miriam on our label, the dark times are now receding in our rear-view mirror. We are pressing the Big Reprint Button for those few AR books that have slipped out of stock. Just as excitingly, we are preparing offers for a delicious clutch of new books from several of our favourite Angry Robot authors, and are about to introduce you to several new writers as well… Can’t wait to tell you all about them soon.

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Sep
02

Angry Robot at FantasyCon

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TheBulletCatchersDaughter-72dpiThis weekend’s FantasyCon takes place in the beautiful city (or so I’ve heard, never actually visited) of York. Events take place in the Royal York Hotel, and here’s a handy list of where you’ll find some Angry Robot folk, starting with the launch of Rod Duncan‘s The Bullet-Catcher’s Daughter and definitely finished by the legendary disco on Saturday night:

THE BULLET-CATCHER’S DAUGHTER LAUNCH!

SATURDAY 6.00pm – Angry Robot The Bullet-Catcher’s Daughter – Rod Duncan

FRIDAY 5th

7.00pm – Larry Rostant in Conversation Marc Gascoigne interviews our Artist Guest of Honour.

7.00pm – Podcasting for beginners What makes a really good podcast? Which are the ones you should be listening to? How can you make your own? Peter Newman (m), Alasdair Stuart, Emma Newman, Stephen Aryan

SATURDAY 6th

10.00am – But Does It Make Sense?
Economics of fantasy systems. If Smaug holds all the gold and it gets liberated, what does that do to the economy?
Leila Abu el Hawa (m), Kari Sperring, Kate Elliott, Tom Pollock, Anne Lyle

11.00am – It’s the End of the World as we Know It – And I Feel Unsurprised
Does the popularity of dystopia in YA reflect a generation’s expectation of living in a nightmarish future?
Guy Adams (m), Janet Edwards, Leila Abu el Hawa, Jonathan Oliver, Laura Lam

12.00 Noon – Dead Parents, Burned Homesteads and Wicked Stepmothers
Is it essential to write out the parents before youthful characters can head out on adventures? Are adult figures always unhelpful or malign? Should writers search for ways to keep parents around — or do fantasies of a world without parents fulfil a real need?
Marc Gascoigne (m), Edward Cox, Emma Newman, Sophia McDougall, Glenda Larke, Laura Lam

6.00pm – We’ve Got It Covered
What are the elements of great cover design? From artwork and design, through to cover copy and author blurbs.
Larry Rostant, Jim Pitts, Marc Gascoigne, Helen Marshall, Adele Wearing (m)

6.30pm – Mass Signing
Your favourite authors are here, ready to sign your books!

7.00pm – Tea and Jeopardy with Toby Whithouse
Join the Hugo-shortlisted podcast team of Emma Newman and her butler Latimer, as they grill Guest of Honour, Toby Whithouse. Warning: Contains mild peril!
Emma Newman, Peter Newman, Toby Whithouse

9.00pm – Super Relaxed Fantasy Club
Super Relaxed Fantasy Club is a gathering of like-minded SFF fans, getting together for an extremely informal chat about our favourite things. With an emphasis on parity and inclusivity, we have readings and Q&A sessions with writers from a wide range of genres, punctuated by a lot of catching up and gossip. It’s as simple and as relaxed as that. Readings by Laura Lam, Edward Cox, Emma Newman and Niel Bushnell. We’re also thrilled to announce we have a short interview with Simon Spanton from Gollancz, with James Barclay.

FOR THE FULL SCHEDULE, CLICK HERE but here’s one Saturday event you shouldn’t miss…

8.30 – The FantasyCon Disco, sponsored by Gollancz. Dedicated to Hajnalka Bata Strut your funky stuff, oh no. (We’re probably serious about the “oh no”.) With your verrrry special guest DJs… Guy “Funky World House” Adams and your very own Robot overlord, Marc Gascoigne.

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Aug
19

Backlist Boost

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ATTENTION: Bloggers, Podcasters, Interviewers:

Is there a burning question that you wish you’d asked an author when their book first came out?

Did you read an interview or blog post – after your post – which brought more questions or ideas to you?

Or did you simply not have time to chat with a certain author and would now like to?

Too often those wonderful books which precede new title releases are relegated to ‘backlist’ and get less attention than they deserve. So today I want to bring your attention to our many fantastic authors that we’ve published, PRE-2014!

I want to know which of our authors you would like to interview, or have a blog post from, but they must have published pre-2014. This doesn’t exclude authors, that have published with us pre-2014 and throughout this year, but have a think and let me know who you’d like to get in touch with.

Our full list of authors can be found at this link and I’m looking forward to hearing from you with your author selections! Feel free to pick more than one, and I’m sure I can arrange some special giveaways for this Backlist Boost.

Simply get in touch with me, caroline.lambe@angryrobotbooks.com, and I’ll set up any interviews etc. Please note that not all authors will be available but do let me know your ideal author to talk to, and I’ll do my best!

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Aug
18

Robots love Hugos

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The Hugo AwardsSoooo, we can’t imagine that if you have any interest in the wider world of science fiction that you missed the winners of this year’s Hugo Awards, presented as the climax of the massive, and massively enjoyable, Worldcon here in England’s London, aka Loncon 3. But just in case, here’s a completely biased summary:

Kameron Hurley won TWO. As we said there in the hall, hell yeah! In fact, we screamed and whooped and screamed some more.

And that’s not all. We’re so, so proud of our writer friends and colleagues who placed well in the rankings, with nominations for:

Emma Newman, for her sensational Tea & Jeopardy podcast
Both Wesley Chu and Ramez Naam, up for the John W Campbell Award for best new writer (yeah yeah, OK, not strictly a Hugo yadda yadda)
Aliette de Bodard, nominated for her lovely novelette, The Waiting Stars.
Our man Mike Underwood, up as part of the team behind the Skiffy & Fanty Podcast.
And our now-departed but still beloved Lee Harris, nominated for Best Editor (Long Form), a fitting end to his AR years as he heads off to pastures new.

Loads of other great people were justly celebrated too, of course, and you can read up on them, even see all of the breakdowns in how people voted if you like. It’s all been rather lovely. Roll on 2015.

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Congratulations to everyone who was voted onto the recent Best Of lists from Locus, but a special celebration belongs to our very own Emma Newman as Between Two Thorns was included in the Best Fantasy Novel category! The first book in the Split WorldsBetween Two Thorns, has received widespread attention – including a shout-out from The Guardian as “JK Rowling meets Georgette Heyer” – and it certainly belongs in the Top 25 of Best Fantasy Novels. If you have yet to read Between Two Thorns, get yourself to this book page for all the info and read an excerpt.

Well done, Emma!

Between Two Thorns by Emma Newman, March 2013

Categories : AR Authors, Awards
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Jul
14

Nexus Wins the Prometheus Award!

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We are delighted to announce that Ramez Naam‘s Nexus has won the 2014 Prometheus Award from the Libertarian Futurist Society, tying with Cory Doctorow‘s brilliant Homeland!

Ramez was short-listed for both Nexus and its sequel Crux with Nexus described thusly in the awards announcement:

Nexus offers a gripping exploration of politics and new extremes of both freedom and tyranny in a near future where emerging technology opens up unprecedented possibilities for mind control or personal liberation and interpersonal connection.

Ramez Naam: “I’m absolutely honored and thrilled to be receiving the Prometheus Award for Best Novel, and even moreso to be sharing it with Cory Doctorow, a writer who exemplifies what it means to use the written word to fight to expand human freedoms. I wrote Nexus and Crux to explore the potential of neuroscience to link together and improve upon human minds. But I also wrote them to explore the roles of censorship, surveillance, prohibition, and extra-legal state use of force in a future not far from our own. Science and technology can be used to lift people up or to trod them underfoot. Making those abstract future possibilities real in the present is a core goal in my novels. I’m glad the selection committee saw that, and I’m very grateful to them for this award!”

Lee Harris:With his three Nexus books (NexusCrux, and the forthcoming Apex), Ramez Naam has proved to be not only a master storyteller, but also a free thinker, whose writing encourages us – his readers – to think more critically about the world around us. I can’t think of a more fitting award for one of the finest new writers of our generation.”

Ramez will be at Worldcon in London next month to happily receive his award, and if you’d like to see him before this, come along to our Angry Robot Summer Invasion of Forbidden Planet on Wednesday 13 August!

Join us in congratulating Ramez on Twitter!

Nexus by Ramez Naam

Nexus

About the awards

The Prometheus Award, sponsored by the Libertarian Futurist Society (LFS), was established in 1979, making it one of the most enduring awards after the Nebula and Hugo awards, and one of the oldest fan-based awards currently in sf. Presented annually since 1982 at the World Science Fiction Convention, the Prometheus Awards include a gold coin and plaque for the winners.

For more than three decades, the Prometheus Awards have recognized outstanding works of science fiction and fantasy that stress the importance of liberty as the foundation for civilization, peace, prosperity, progress and justice.

For a full list of past Prometheus Award winners in all categories, visit www.lfs.org. Membership in the Libertarian Futurist Society is open to any science fiction fan interested in how fiction can promote an appreciation of the value of liberty.

More information is available at http://lfs.org.

Author headshot Ramez NaamWe’re already set for a bumper evening with Anne LyleMike ShevdonAdam ChristopherWesley Chu and Madeline Ashby at Forbidden Planet on Wednesday 13 August at 6pm, but we’re delighted to announce that Ramez Naam will also be joining us!

Join us for an evening of readings, signing, and robotic dance moves. Enjoy an informal evening of meeting some of your favourite authors and listening to some fantastic fiction!

RSVP

Forbidden Planet have an event page on their Facebook page on which you can RSVP, and I do encourage you to do so. Surprise, surprise, here’s a handy link to said Facebook page! You can also tweet us, @angryrobotbooks, or @forbiddenplanet. Please feel free to share with your friends, colleagues, enemies – hey, we don’t discriminate, and we look forward to seeing you on Wednesday, 13 August!

Categories : AR Authors
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