Archive for Robots at large

Aug
05

Angry Robot Live! video playlist

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AR-CMYK-logo 72dpi

Attention, Robot Army!

I have collected all four of the Angry Robot Live! panels so far into a YouTube Playlist, which you can find here.

 

The playlist is also embedded here, for your viewing pleasure. Partake of all of the robotic wisdom and wisecracking from the comfort of your cubicle, cabana, or wireless-enabled mobile artillery platform.

 

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Jul
30

Angry Robot Live! #4 Recap

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Last night was our fourth Angry Robot Live! We talked about Scope and Scale in Fantasy.

Our panelists were Kameron Hurley and Anna Kashina.

 

If you missed the live show, you can watch the whole thing here. Please note that you’ll want to turn up the volume for the first 23 or so minutes, as Kameron’s audio was soft until she switched over to a different mic.

Much fun was had by all!

 

During the panel, Kameron mentioned Universe Sandbox.

And this is me waving goodbye to dozens of writers reading this as they disappear for two weeks.

 

Gatsby wave goodbye

 

Paul S. Kemp wasn’t able to make the panel, but he wrote at length via twitter on his thoughts about Scope and Scale. You can read them in a Storify here.

 

And last, but not least, I’ve included a couple of questions below that we weren’t able to answer during the panel.

From Paul Weimer:

How does individual character creation and development change (or not) in working in different scale sizes in Fantasy?

Do you find maps, glossaries, concordances a necessary evil or a joy to create (and have readers read) in secondary world fantasy?

Do you start or approach a novel idea differently depending on whether its S&S or Epic in its scales/stakes?

 

Please feel free to continue the conversation here in the comments. Until next time, Stay Angry.

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It’s that time again, folks – time for Angry Robot Live!

This month, we’re bringing you a discussion of Scope and Scale in Fantasy – from the intense back-alley tales of sword & sorcery to the world-breaking sagas of epic fantasy, the genre spans a huge range in terms of scope. Our panel will discuss the benefits and tradeoffs of operating at different scales, and we’ll dig into what makes tales at the different levels of scope powerful in their own ways.

The panel includes:

Kameron Hurley, Kitsschie and Sydney J. Bounds Award-winner and nominee for the Hugo, Nebula, and Locus awards. Her The Mirror Empire drops on August 26th in the US/CAN.
Anna Kashina, author of the Majat Code (Blades of the Old Empire, and The Guild of Assassins, which releases on August 5th in the US and CAN).
Paul S. Kemp, New York Times-bestselling author of Star Wars and Dungeons & Dragons novels, and the author of the Tales of Egil and Nix (The Hammer and the Blade, A Discourse in Steel).
James A Moore, author of over twenty novels, nominee for the Bram Stoker Award, and author of Seven Forges and The Blasted Lands.

 

Kameron Hurley

Anna Kashina headshot

 

 

 

Paul-300x232James A Moore

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The panel will be Tuesday, July 29th, at 8:30 PM EDT (5:30 PM PDT), and should run about an hour.

If you have any questions for our panelists, please feel free to post them here in the comments, tweet them with #ARLive, or join us to ask them yourself!

RSVP for the event here.

Hello, all! Mike here, with news of our third Angry Robot Live! panel.

On Wednesday, at 11:30AM PDT/2:30PM EDT/7:30PM BST, we’re going to be talking about series writing (how to do it, why to do it, how not to do it), with four fantastic Angry Robot authors:

Adam Christopher, Sir Julius Vogel-award-winner and author of Empire State, The Age Atomic, Seven Wonders, Hang Wire, and others.
Anne Lyle, Syndey J. Bounds-nominated author of The Alchemist of Souls, The Merchant of Dreams, and The Prince of Lies.
Carrie Patel, author of the forthcoming The Buried Life and Cities & Thrones.
Chuck Wendig, John W. Campbell-nominated author of Blackbirds, Mockingbird, The Cormorant, The Blue Blazes, and many more.

 

Adam Christopher author photoAnne Lyle author photoCarrie PatelChuck Wendig author photo

 

 

RSVP for the event here. As before, there will be some prizes for people who ask questions of our illustrious panel. If you won’t be able to join us for the hangout, you can leave questions here in the comments or on Twitter the day of with the #AngryRobotLive.

Hope to see you on Wednesday for the event!

 

Jun
19

Phoenix Comic-Con report

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At the start of the month, Senior Editor Lee Harris and Exhibit A editor Bryon Quertermous and I all climbed into our Angry Robotic jets and hurtled through the sky to Phoenix, Arizona, where we promptly melted.

End of story.

Not quite. The heat was intense, and it put our cooling systems into over-drive, but we managed to make our way to the convention center for Phoenix Comic-Con.

We had a booth in author’s alley, proud neighbors to many of the members of the illustrious Taco Chuch. We were excited to be supporting three Angry Robot authors (Wesley Chu, Jay Posey, Chuck Wendig) and one Strange Chemistry author (Danielle Jensen) at the convention, and to spread the good word of SF/F/WTF? to new readers.

Our authors had panels here and there all weekend, taking breaks by hanging out at the booth and selling books by their sheer radiant presence.

Lee Harris and I lead an Angry Robot preview panel, which has been summarized in great style here. (Highlights – interpretive dance, competitive comps, and manstresses).

Phoenix Comic-Con had a very well-designed and well-run literary track, and the staff overall did a great job, especially considering how rapidly the convention has been growing (It had 55,000 attendees last year, and 77,000 this year). Despite the brutal heat, all robot units returned home operational and ready to continue operation.

Next stop, CONvergence!

As most of you know, I don’t come from a scifi or fantasy publishing world; my previous role was in publicity for Irish non-fiction titles as well as crime fiction, and that oft-controversial term, literary fiction. I wasn’t utterly new to the terms SF / F / WTF (maybe I was to WTF!) as through my own personal reading, I’ve read – and loved –  Scott Lynch, Philip Pullman, and Eoin Colfer, and had the usual childhood favourites such as Narnia and Harry Potter. I love True Blood, Buffy, and Star Trek, amongst others but can’t quote you lines or tell you what happened in every episode. Ever. I joined the queues to see The Hunger Games, Snow White & the Huntsman, Scott Pilgrim vs. the World, Spiderman, Stardust, and a host of other movies, but because I really enjoyed them, not because they were genre specific.

But, since joining the Angry Robot team early this year, words like utopian, dystopian, steampunk, epic fantasy, paranormal romance, urban fantasy, xenobiology, are now the norm, and it has been an exciting, occasionally-overwhelming, world to discover. I’ve been flung in all sorts of reading directions, mainly by Strange Chemistry’s reading guru Amanda, and was addicted to George R.R. Martin within about 3 pages; fell in love with John Green’s phenomenal YA story The Fault In Our Stars; am currently reading Kushiel’s Dart, and have read – and had varying reactions to – dozens of our Angry Robot and Strange Chemistry titles. I’ve learned that fantasy is more my own personal thing than scifi, although Wesley Chu‘s The Lives of Tao (Vote for him at Goodreads Choice Awards here!) and Ramez Naam‘s Nexus became some of my all-time favourite books, and that Chuck Wendig‘s books suit my crime-fiction-grotesque-scenes-loving-self.

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However, not any of the above made me feel fully qualified to attend last weekend’s World Fantasy Con in Brighton. I admit I had major preconceptions. I have met some terrific people over the course of the last six months, but also have discovered that genre world inhabitants can be, and I hasten to point out can be - not are, protective of their world. Sometimes, rightly so. One of the panels over the weekend discussed the issue of “The Mainstream and Us”, showing that the positioning of “genre fiction” is still an issue. I did fear that conversations would be way over my beginners-level head, and wondered that if many of the attendees knew each other from various cons, how open would they be to a newbie? I should never have worried. It was a great weekend, and I wanted to tell you a little about what it was like for a newbie:

The Bar

Before heading to Brighton, I had been told that this was a very “bar-friendly” convention. I was unsure as to the actual meaning of this – were people going to be sitting, drinking, at 11am? If so, I should have been into this world a long time ago. She jests. Kinda. But that does actually sum up the convivial nature of this convention: from any time of the day, people would gather in the lobby bars and drink coffee – at least, in the early stages of the day – and meet those faces they knew, but also those they did not. Hats off to the organisers for the “newbie” area of the bar, where those who didn’t know too many could congregate and meet fellow newcomers.

The Crowd

A lot of the talk I heard was about the size of the crowd – approx 1400 attendees – and how this allowed for a more open, warm, atmosphere. When I asked Lee for some reference point on this, he said WorldCon is akin to the London Book Fair; I see now that I had a nice, gentle, first convention experience! The layout of the hotel and the event halls was easy to navigate and all close together. This made for easy access if one was running from one panel to the next, or wanted to get to the dealers’ room to stock up before meeting an author. Any time I wandered from one room to the next, I saw friendly faces, and the “red coats” were ever-present ensuring that people know where they were going and were OK. Huge congratulations to them!

Aims

I had a couple of aims for the weekend: to meet our attending authors – and some for the first time!, to meet as many people from my online world as possible, to try and not fangirl if I saw Scott Lynch, to attend panels, and to generally get a better sense of the fantasy world. What I didn’t expect was to have so much fun whilst doing all of it!

Better Than I Ever Thought It Would Be

From the minute I arrived at the Hilton hotel and bumped into Lizzie and Claire from the Big Green Bookshop reading and writing groups, the weekend was one big friendly affair. I met old and new faces, chatted to strangers and made new friends; sat in on interesting panels that were open and encouraging; mingled at the mass signing; enjoyed the parties of Tor and Voyager; had long lunches with our authors – inventing futures for Mike Shevdon’s family members!; was made cry by Mike with a synopsis of the most haunting story he’s writing; laughed with Jonathan L. Howard over a pizza dinner; queued at the wrong hall with Wesley Chu before his own ninja reading; and of course, hung out with my colleagues outside the office.

As for me and conventions? Sign me right up. My advice: leave any preconceptions at the door, and throw yourself into this wonderful – and wacky – world. I’m not sure any other genre of writing could be so open and welcoming. To all the lovely bloggers and online friends that I met: Mieneke, Ellie, Vicky, Charlie Jane, Annalee; to our authors: James, Adam, Kim, Anne, Mike, Jonathan, LauraWes, Joseph, Emma, and all those that I didn’t get to meet; to Darren & Jo; to Lizzie & Claire; to the new friends, agents, and readers alike, that I met, thank you all so much for a fantastic first con, and I look forward to seeing you all again!

Now to get myself to the shop and buy up all the books I discovered, or else knew about and am now urged to buy their books because of their brilliant panels: Holly Black, Patrick Rothfuss, Joe Abercrombie, Garth Nix, Tanith Lee, Hal Duncan, Adrian Stone, Tad Williams, and many, many more, await!

PS: I completely fangirled when I met Scott Lynch. Oh well!

PPS: Sorry if there’s anyone I forgot to mention…

Snapshots

 

 

The Author - Wesley ChuAngry Robot Author Wesley Chu, author of the soon-to-be-published science fiction secret agent extravaganza The Lives of Tao, will be appearing alongside a few fellow Chicago-based science fiction writers at Open Books on Thursday February 28th.

The occasion is the launch of Chicago Writers Conference Events at Open Books. The series kicks off with this particular evening of Science Fiction readings hosted by Hugo and Nebula Award–nominated author William Shunn. Wesley will be reading from The Lives of Tao and will be happy to answer questions about the book, or being a writer, or his life as a kung-fu stuntman. (You think we’re kidding about that last part, don’t you? We’re really not…)

It’s a free event, open to all, and runs from 6.30 to 9.00 p.m. Open Books, “an award-winning nonprofit social venture that operates an extraordinary bookstore, provides community programs, and mobilizes passionate volunteers to promote literacy in Chicago and beyond”, can be found at:

213 W. Institute Place
Chicago, IL 60610
(1 block north of Chicago & Franklin el stop.)

See the Open Books Website for further details.

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Feb
24

Robot Round-Up, 24.02.12

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Is it the weekend already? Phew! So here’s the plan: tomorrow, bright and early, get yourself to a bookstore. Find that great section at the back or up the right side where those extra-lovely books are… and buy some books. Could be ours, could be other peoples’ – but you know you want them, you know you need them. Make them yours, bring them home, job done.

So anyway, you may just have noticed that the damn righteous Dead Harvest is due out any moment. Meet the man behind it as Angry Robot’s Chuck Wendig talks to Angry Robot’s Chris F Holm at Terribleminds.com (we really do get everywhere). Meanwhile, Chris also talked to Elizabeth A. White about how he found his inspiration for the book’s protagonist in Hell and offered some sage advice for would-be Thriller writers over at the ITW’s The Thrill Begins blog.

On SFFWorld.com, Mark Yon took a good, long look at Dead Harvest and declared it highly recommendable: “In a crowded world of Urban Fantasy, it’s difficult to make an impression amongst the many, many tales out there. However, as far as urban fantasy goes, this is one of the most assured debuts I’ve read since first reading Jim Butcher’s first Dresden.”

Dead Harvest was also reviewed over at sheneverslept.com, where it scored a perfect five out of five tentacles: “Dead Harvest grabbed and held me from beginning to end. Chris F. Holm has crafted a nicely dark urban fantasy with a truly unique protagonist”. Likewise, blogger Elizabeth A. White was suitably impressed, saying: “Holm takes a pinch of fantasy, a little supernatural, a dash of hardboiled crime fiction, and blends them into a pitch-perfect adventure in a way that is nothing short of authorial alchemy.”

Plus, Dead Harvest was profiled by Eric Beetner for CriminalElement.com‘s Fresh Meat files and reviewed by blogger Stephen West. And the frankly rather awesome cover art triumphed in the February Cover Wars over at The Qwillery (and we know that Chris wanted that one, badly).

The very friendly David Tallerman was interviewed by Sci-Fi Fan Letter and also talked to SFSignal.com about the not-so-secret ingredient in Giant Thief. And you can have a go at winning a copy of Giant Thief, courtesy of Fantasy Book Review.

Upcoming Titanic/30 Days of Night mash-up sensation Carpathia by the superb Matt Forbeck was reviewed by lovevampires.com, Starburst magazine and Adventures Fantastic. And just as this round-up was going to press… um, screen, the chaps on Lightsaber Ratting were so taken with it they suggested “there is no way that this book doesn’t become a movie”, and the venerable Starburst said “Fans of Kim Newman’s Anno Dracula will find a lot to love here, as will anyone who prefers their horror with a hint of claustrophobia.”

The reviews of Adam Christopher‘s Empire State keep on coming – the latest being courtesy of allwaysunmended.com.

City of Hope and Despair by Ian Whates was reviewed too, over at Sci-Fi Fan Letter

As we get ready for its April publication, Anne Lyle kicked off a series of deleted scenes from The Alchemist of Souls.

Meanwhile, well, it’s not out till May, but we had our first rave for Blackbirds by that man Chuck Wendig – just first of many, we are certain.

And even fuuuurther out, Mister Mike Shevdon gave his first interview for a while to SFF World, looking at the Courts of the Feyre series so far and previewing this June’s upcoming Strangeness & Charm – together with a review of book one in the series, Sixty-One Nails.

Gav Thorpe talked to The Shell Case about his work in the Warhammer universe, as well as the forthcoming conclusion to his Crown of the Blood saga: The Crown of the Usurperand his plans for the future. He also did valuable service on his own blog, crunching the numbers on classic fantasy tropes: http://mechanicalhamster.wordpress.com/2012/02/17/elf-preservation-part-one/

Lauren Beukes was interviewed by Rue-Morgue.com

And finally, over at fellow imprint Strange Chemistry, chatterbox and editor Amanda Rutter revealed some of the science and much of the art of reading submissions. She also talked all things Strange and Chemical over at the Intergalactic Academy.

So much going on! You might as well give away your TV and your Xbox, you know. Books are the past, the present and definitely the future!

Oct
25

Rampant Robots

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Here’s your bumper round-up of all things Robot. (Cue annoying dee-dee-diddly-dee news anchor ident sting overlaid with anachronistic sound of typewriters…)

Lovely Aliette de Bodard went deep, deep into the world of Acatl as she discussed the final novel in the Obsidian & Blood trilogy, Master of the House of Darts, with the Faster Times.

Aaand she made this lovely trailer for this latest Acatl novel too. Studio roll VT:

Aaaaaaaaand she’s running a really cool Aztec-themed competition on her blog. Check it out and win win win, as apparently they say!

Lovely Trent Jamieson talked all things Roil with the nice folks at Ranting Dragon.

Ahead of the concluding volume, King’s War, lovely Maurice Broaddus took a long, hard look at the extraordinary world of his Knights of Breton Court series for the Pudge Factor.

Lovely Lauren Beukes, modestly not mentioning much about her massive, massive new book deal (me and her mother, Mrs Harris, are so damn proud), was interviewed by Bruce Sterling. Yes, that Bruce Sterling.

Anne Lyle was lovely enough to share some advance secrets from her upcoming magical Elizabethan fantasy The Alchemist of Souls with Fran Terminielo.

The lovely KW Jeter was Guest of Honor at Steamcon III recently. Check out the pics and a great write up from Steampunk News. We think all our authors should get an official convention photo done with a girl with a boat on her head. No, just because.

And finally, no skateboarding puppies this week, but instead the lovely Lavie Tidhar gave great podcast for the Skiffy & Fanty Show in this discussion of his new novel Osama. It’s not by us, but it’s bloody great so fair dues and all that.

Sep
19

Angry Robot Hour!

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Well personally I think we should have one of these every week.. but I’m told this is, for now, a one-off special event for all our Antipodean chums.

If you’re going to Conflux, Australia’s premier SF convention, at the end of the month, be sure to join a trio of our best authors for some metallic fun and games. Out in force and pressing the flesh of all you grateful meat-things will be local Robot representatives Jo Anderton, Trent Jamieson and Kaaron Warren, for a full hour of meet & greet & readings plus (we’re told/warned) some appropriately AR-themed refreshments.

Oh, if only we could be there too… (don’t finish that sentence).

Aug
17

Empire State preview over at Noir Week

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Those stand-up gents and dames over at Tor.com are running Noir Week right about now, and we thought we might just muscle in on a piece of their action.

So head on over thattaway for an exclusive sneak-read of a chapter from Adam Christopher‘s wondrous Empire State, a whole five months before it’s published.

Yes, really. Fly, fly now!

Advent Calendar
Today’s Advent Calendar treat has not 1, not 3, not 4, but 2 (count ‘em – two!) pieces of flash fiction from one of our merry band of authors.

Un:Bound Video Trailer
Those crazy folk over at Un:Bound (a great genre book blog) have decided to create a video series call Un:Bound Video Editions (UBVE). The first edition goes live sometime tonight, but check out the trailer, below. (And who is that handsome chap in the glasses? No, not him – the other one…)

Nebula Awards
Awards season is once again upon us – not that it ever really goes away. We’re currently smack-bang in the middle of the nominations round for the Nebulas – the awards voted on by members of the SFWA. For clarity, these are the Angry Robot titles that are currently eligible for consideration:

Moxyland by Lauren Beukes

Sixty-One Nails by Mike Shevdon
The Road to Bedlam by Mike Shevdon

Slights by Kaaron Warren

Triumff: Her Majesty’s Hero by Dan Abnett

Winter Song by Colin Harvey
Damage Time by Colin Harvey

Angel of Death by J Robert King

The Bookman by Lavie Tidhar

The Crown of the Blood by Gav Thorpe

Edge by Thomas Blackthorne (John Meaney)

King Maker by Maurice Broaddus

Nekropolis by Tim Waggoner

Book of Secrets by Chris Roberson

City of Dreams and Nightmare by Ian Whates

Servant of the Underworld by Aliette de Bodard

Kell’s Legend by Andy Remic
Soul Stealers by Andy Remic

Aug
26

Lavie Tidhar, Dan Abnett and @SFXmagazine

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Lavie

Yesterday was a long day, but thoroughly enjoyable. I travelled from York to London and back (a 450 mile round trip) to meet The Bookman author Lavie Tidhar for lunch, on one of his occasional forays to the UK, followed by an evening spend with Dan Abnett Esquire, his lovely wife Nik, and various member of the British Science Fiction Association. I interviewed Dan for the BSFA, and – as always – he was a fascinating interviewee, talking with great passion for around an hour and a half about his work for various tie-in universes (in comic, novel and screenplay formats) as well as his later work with original fiction. The BSFA always have a raffle at these events, so Dan brought a few of his graphic novels, Angry Robot supplied a few books,  and The Black Library generously donated some books and audiobooks, too.

Last night was also the SFX party to celebrate the world’s biggest SF magazine reaching issue 200! That’s quite an achievement! Unfortunately, though I was invited (and accepted the invitation) I got my dates muddled up,and didn’t realise it was on the same night I was interviewing Dan, so I missed the party, though Lavie went in my stead, and thoroughly enjoyed himself, by all accounts. Congratulations to Dave Bradley and his team – and here’s to the next 200!

So, a good time had by all (despite the torrential rain – yeah, thanks, London).

We’ll be podcasting the interview with Dan soon, so keep an eye (and an ear) out for that.

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Aug
20

Lissun and lurn

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We do like our podcasts, and we know quite a few of you do, too.

So, just in case you’ve missed them, here’s a list of recent podcasts featuring the Angry Robot crew:

Angry Robot Podcast number 2 – featuring Kaaron Warren and Lauren Beukes

WordPunk podcast – eBooks and eReaders – featuring Lee Harris (of Angry Robot),  Dave Devereux and Emma Davies

Lauren Beukes – Interview at the British Science Fiction Association

Angry Robot Podcast number 1 – featuring Marc Gascoigne and Lee Harris

Alt.Fiction podcasts:
(10) The World of Publishing – featuring Marc Gasgoigne (of Angry Robot), Steve Tribe, Jenni Hill and Jon Weir
(3) Blogging and the Internet – featuring Lee Harris (of Angry Robot), Vincent Holland-Keen and Alasdair Stuart

And fon’t forget – for the Angry Robot monthly podcast:

Subscribe via RSS feed or via iTunes.

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Jun
30

Angry Robot of the Week

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This week’s feature, by Alasdair Stuart, was originally scheduled for last week, but we had to hold it back because Sonny was Just. So. Angry! Luckily, he’s calmed down a bit, now. And no – the name of the film in which he stars is not the working title for the next Apply gadget, even though Sonny looks like he was designed in those hallowed halls. We think.

Angry Robot of the Week
Week Four
Sonny

So let’s talk about the product placement in the room, shall we? Sonny is the central robot in I, Robot, Alex Proyas’ controversial adaptation/hybrid/chimera/Chuck Taylor Converse ad version of some of Isaac Asimov’s stories. It’s a very easy film to rag on for a whole variety of reasons, starting with what a lot of people perceive as a script that doesn’t remotely honour the source material and finishing with Will Smith looking up at a large bank of evil robots and muttering ‘Oh HELL no.’ Read More→