Archive for Robot Round-Up

Mar
07

Media Round Up 07/03/14

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Hello to all you robots (angry or otherwise!),

Since its ARC copies went out our 100th book Hang Wire by  Adam Christopher has been practically deluged by positive reviews.

And in honour of last night’s book signing event at the Forbidden Planet Megastore in London we’re bringing you some of the more recent reviews to remind everyone what a fantastic book this is!

Hang Wire by Adam Christopher

Hang Wire by Adam Christopher“Hang Wire is just pure fun. Yes, there are some dark doings here (something huge is awakening underground and gods are running around wearing human facades, and of course, murder), however, Adam Christopher manages to pull off the right amount of creepy (and some great action scenes) without ever getting too dark. Fans of quirky urban fantasy will devour this one. Loved it!” - My Bookish Ways

“Hang Wire is an awesome read (and that’s understating it by far), from the first pages I was hooked. Not only has Adam Christopher written a great story, it is also his writing style that readily pulled me in and never let me go.” - The Book Plank

“Hang Wire is flush with the sort of geek-centric weirdness and galloping, whiz-bang pace that Christopher had previously only begun to master. In spite of so many moving parts, the result is a tightly wound, dynamic piece of genre-bending machinery. If that’s a metaphor for Christopher’s awestruck vision of melting-pot America, all’s the better.” - NPR Books

“Lightning fast, overflowing with imagination and great fun to read, Hang Wire will definitely capture Adam Christopher some new fans.” - The Tattooed Book

“Adam Christopher’s HANG WIRE reads like Erin Morgenstern via Tim Powers, but the dark, creepy heart that beats at its center is entirely its own. It’s good unclean fun, and so addictive.” - Kelly Braffet

“Christopher fulfils our expectations and more: just when we think the story couldn’t get any weirder, he adds a whole new layer of weird, bouncing from one unexpected moment of goofiness to another, keeping us stuck to our chairs until we think it’ll take an industrial-strength solvent to pry us loose. Days after finishing the book, you’ll still have a grin on your face.” - Booklist Starred Review

Lets hope our 200th book is just as popular, if its anything like Hangwire we’re in no doubt it will be!

(If you’d like to read some more reviews of fantastic book you can find them on our Hang Wire page).

But that’s not all we’re bringing you today, we’re also taking a look at what reviewers have been saying about Known Devil, the third book in the Occult Investigations Series by Justin Gustainis.

Like its predecessors – Hard Spell and Evil Dark – Known Devil follows the continued efforts of Stan Markowski and the Occult Crimes Unit to keep the peace in Scranton, PA.

A lot of people were very excited for this, so lets see if it lived up to expectations.

Known Devil by Justin Gustainis

Known Devil, by Justin Gustainis, cover art by Timothy Lantz“Its quirky, has a great overall arc and when added to a criminal element goes on to show how tricky policing the unusual can be. Its definitely something that I would recommend to others and a series that has done nothing but entertain since its original release.” – Falcata Times

“All in all, Known Devil is a fun book. It is exactly the entertaining, action packed, supernatural beings filled novel I was hoping for.” – Luxury Reading

“I highly recommend this to people who want something a little gritty, a little dark, a bit nostalgic and different from the average Urban Fantasy novel.” – Fangs Wands and Fairy Dust

“With this many different kinds of creatures in play there seems to be no end to the possibilities in this series, and I would very much like to see what Mr. Gustainis might have in store for Stan and Karl in the future.” – That’s What I’m Talking About

“I had a great time with Known Devil and tore through it in a single sitting” – A Fantastical Librarian

Sounds like another fantastic edition to Occult Investigation Series!

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Jan
31

Robot Round Up 31/01/14

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Hi everyone,

It’s round up time again and this week we’re taking a look at all the fantastic awards and nominations our authors have been getting lately!

 

The Mad Scientist’s Daughter by Cassandra Rose Clarke

The Mad Scientist's Daughter by Cassandra Rose Clarke - Feb 2013First up, we’re so excited that The Mad Scientist’s Daughter by Cassandra Rose Clarke has been nominated for the Philip K. Dick award! What is it about this book that readers and critics love so much? Here are just a few of the many amazing reviews:

“You won’t be the same after you read The Mad Scientist’s Daughter, trust me. [...] Rich, complex, and delightfully-developed, The Madman’s Daughter opens up new worlds of possibility and does so with elegance and grace.”
-s.e. smith, at this ain’t livin’

“The characters are what drives this story, whether it’s Cat struggling through life, her mad yet grounded and caring father, the friends and lovers Cat meets throughout her life, or Finn, the android who doesn’t want to be human yet seems like the most perfect creation.”
- Katherine Stubbs, Shades of Sentience

“One of the most heart-clenching and gut-wrenching love stories I have ever read. I bet no-one reading this review has ever read an unrequited love story where the love is only unrequited because science has not made it possible, yet. Heart meet knife! Clarke’s exploration of human nature versus science versus faith versus the disingenuous youth are the reasons this book needs to be read and loved by everyone.”
– Vicki, Open Book Society

“I urge you to read this book, it will haunt you and stay with you for a long time. It is very hard to believe that this is only the author’s second novel – bravo Miss Clarke!”
- Wendy of the Geek Syndicate

“The twist is that the cool, rational Finn is a robot, and Cat’s love for him is unrequited because she ages while he does not, and he is not programmed to respond to her emotions. It’s a neat premise and Clark examines the ramifications with the precision of a poet”.
- Eric Brown, The Guardian

“It’s not a story of future heroism. It’s not even, really, a story about robots. It’s a story of live and failure and expectations. It is, perhaps, in its relentless examination of one woman’s life, one of the most realistic science fiction stories ever told.”
- Michael Ann Dobbs for IO9.com

“Cat is a finely etched character, difficult, distant, and living in denial of her true feelings for years … Cassandra Rose Clarke does a fine job of staying inside her protagonist’s head, and capturing what it’s like to drift through life without the will or the opportunity to make the best decisions.”
- Adam-Troy Castro, Sci Fi Magazine (print only)

The Mad Scientist’s Daughter reminded me of a couple of books I haven’t read in years, books I loved dearly that still haunt me. It has the strange feel of Geoff Ryman’s The Child Garden, a terribly sad story that was ultimately so rewarding. It also sparked some of the same emotions I feel while reading anything by China Miéville.”
- Tammy Sparks, Books, Bones & Buffy

“This book is about LOVE mostly and family, betrayal, emotion and what happiness means, but so totally science fiction. It is an amazing book and I enjoyed so much that I will be looking for more books by Cassandra Rose Clarke.”
- Katie Turner, Turner’s Antics

“At it’s heart, it’s a beautifully written story, not only exploring the complexities between Cat and Finn, but also her changing relationships with her parents, and the other men who enter her life.”
- Michelle, BCF Book Reviews

“I read this book with a constant sense of impending doom…I expected disaster and drama around ever corner. But this isn’t one of those books. This book is more subtle, a much more realistic picture of an imagined world, and I loved it.”
- Leah at LeahRhyne.com

“Cassandra Rose Clarke has proven she can write with the best of them in this one and I expect this was just a taste of what is to come from her.”
- Liam, The Troubled Scribe

“this book is heavy on the romance side. The science fiction element is there but very subtle but not as much until it becomes superficial. Instead, it gives the story this otherworldly quality.”
- Zuleeza at **QWERTY**

Nexus by Ramez Naam

Nexus by Ramez Naam

Nexus

Second, the fantastic Nexus by Ramez Naam has been nominated for the Golden Tentacle (Debut) award in the Kitschies! Congratulations also to the wonderful Will Staehle, whose cover art for The Age Atomic by Adam Christopher has been nominated for the Inky Tentacle.

Here’s what just a few people have had to say about Nexus:

“Ramez Naam’s debut novel Nexus is a superbly plotted high-tension technothriller about a War-on-Drugs-style crackdown on brain/computer interfaces … full of delicious, thoughtful moral ambiguity … excellent spycraft, kick-ass action scenes, and a chilling look at a future cold war over technology and ideology, making a hell of a read.”
- Cory Doctorow, BoingBoing

“It’s good. Scary good. Take a chance and stop reading now and have a great time reading a bleeding edge technical thriller that is full of surprises.”
- James Floyd Kelly, Wired.com’s GeekDad blog

“a fast, fun read which is both emotionally engaging and thought-provoking. You’ll be mulling over the implications of Nexus — the book and the drug — long after you put the book down.”
- Annalee Newitz, IO9.com

“Naam displays a Michael Crichton-like ability to explain cutting-edge research via the medium of an airport techno-thriller.”
SFX Magazine

“the action scenes are crisp, the glimpses of future tech and culture are mesmerizing”
Publishers Weekly

“Mr. Naam sees all the angles of future technology almost too imaginatively to keep up with … Nexus joins Paul McAuley’s Fairyland (1995) as a double-edged vision of the post-human.”
- Tom Shippey, Wall Street Journal

“This sophisticated page-turning techno-thriller is one of my favorite stories of all time … Naam is remarkable in his ability to address deep philosophical concepts while keeping the story line light, fast, and action-packed.”
- Stephen L. Macknik, Scientific American Illusion Chasers blog

“Naam, an expert in new technologies and author of More Than Human: Embracing the Promise of Biological Enhancement (2005), turns in a stellar performance with his debut sf novel … Naam has set himself a difficult challenge here: he’s telling a story in which much of the action and dialogue takes place inside the characters’ minds. But he succeeds admirably”.
- David Pitt, BookList

“a very readable book … deals with real world ramifications of next-generation technology in a believable, if somewhat scary, fashion. It’s accurate without being boring, and action-packed without being trite or vapid.”
- Matthew S. Dent, Interzone

The Lives of Tao by Wesley Chu

The Lives of Tao by Wesley ChuThe Lives of Tao by Wesley Chu, which has not only been receiving amazing reviews but also made it into the top ten of the Goodreads Choice Awards science fiction novels of 2013, has now been given an Alex (ALA) Award for adult books that appeal to teens! Want a reminder of why Tao is getting so much love?

Since the moment I finished Wesley Chu’s debut novel, The Lives of Tao, I called reading it ‘the most fun I’ve had this year.’
Staffer’s Book Review

Note to James Patterson fans: this is how to write a sci-fi page turner.
Sci-Fi Bulletin

A sci-fi thriller this may be, but it has a lot of emotional depth to it.
Fantasy Faction

Wesley Chu’s debut novel The Lives of Tao is a fun book that will appeal directly to those who enjoy Charles Stross’s Laundry novels (2004-).
Strange Horizons

The Lives of Tao is a fun book with a lot of energy and it really worked for me. Full of action, adventure, martial arts, gunplay, and large quantities of geeky goodness. I would recommend this book to anyone looking for something a lighter than the current swathe of serious sci-fi / fantasy.
– Fantasy Book Review

An exceptionally entertaining book, Chu’s writing is easy to consume and leaves you wanting more.  Definitely one to read, and an author to watch.
– British Fantasy Society

…makes this book what it is: one of the freshest, most fun debuts I’ve read in quite a while!
My Bookish Ways

I think this is one of the best amalgamations of SF, Thriller, buddy-stories, comedy and other genre assortments, which was even more impressive because it’s a debut and is funny as hell. The story is a nice one with a bit of everything to satisfy most readers, beginning with characterization.
Fantasy Book Critic

We need to be able to identify with what’s going on, and while sci-fi has historically given us a vehicle to discuss some very serious things by using the unreality as a smokescreen (female officers on the Enterprise and whatnot) to tell a really compelling and interesting story in science fiction, the window dressing of future worlds and alien species needs to still allow reasonable suspension of disbelief and Chu absolutely nails it.
– Speculative Post

“Vividly entertaining, this is a book that looks past the lively and thrilling glamour of life as an international spy and also merges several genres together into a cohesive whole to tell a story that rocks from start to finish.”
– The Founding Fields (Shadowhawk)

“The Lives of Tao by Wesley Chu is a very interesting book, and right from the start you will find yourself drawn into the strong narrative and the interesting characters.”
– The Founding Fields (Bane of Kings)

You guys, this book was just AWESOME. I literally don’t have a single complaint about it. It was an action-packed, fun-filled joy ride and I can’t wait to see what’s next in store for Roen and Tao.
– Sarah Says Read

It’s easy to forget about all of that science fiction stuff when you are busy laughing at and cheering for Roen Tan. And that, more than anything else, makes The Lives of Tao one of the best debuts I’ve read this year.
– The 52 Review

Pantomime by Laura Lam

Pantomime-144dpiLastly, we wanted to mention one of our Strange Chemistry titles that has also been pulling in a lot of praise and awards nominations recently. Pantomimea YA fantasy novel by Laura Lam, has been shortlisted in the 2014 NE Teen Book Award, nominated for the 2014 ALA Popular Paperbacks List in the GLBTQ category and the 2014 Cybils Award, and has been announced in the final 2014 Rainbow List! Wow! So what makes Pantomime so special? Here is just a small selection of what people have been saying:

Pantomime by Laura Lam took me into a detailed and exotic world, peopled by characters that I’d love to be friends with . . . and some I’d never want to cross paths with.”
– Robin Hobb, author of the Farseer trilogy

“Ancient myths, vintage tech and living wonders abound in the riotous carnival of fancy which is Pantomime. Lam paints her world with greasepaint and stardust while exploring the notion of the circus ‘freak’ with subtle brilliance. A spectacular and brave debut!”
- Kim Lakin-Smith, author of Cyber Circus

“The atmosphere of R.H. Ragona’s Circus of Magic is everything that I have been missing in other circus reads of late . . . It’s a brave book and one that deserves to be read by a wide audience.”
Ellie @ Curiosity Killed the Bookworm

“These characters are brilliant . . . You can’t help but fall in love with each of them in turn . . .  A completely eye-opening, enthralling debut.”
Joanne @ Once Upon a Bookcase

Pantomime is a dark, gritty world where all the fun of the fair can turn sinister at any time.”
Hannah @ My Book Journey

“A fantastic read, a stunning debut and a jaw dropping secret! I cannot wait for book two.”
Kirsty @ The Overflowing Library

“If there’s ever a book that you need to rush out and pre-order this is it . . . Pantomime is quite possibly one of the best fantasies of its type I have read this year.”
Raimy @ Readaraptor

“Read Pantomime and know what good fantasy can be: intricate, heartbreaking and heartwarming. The best new book I’ve read this year.”
Andrew Hook

Pantomime has all the magic and mystery of The Night Circus . . .”
Maria M. Elmvang

“ I actually stayed up to the early hours of the morning because I just needed to know what was going to happen . . . Pantomime is a fascinating, exciting, thought provoking, colourful read.”
Leanne @ District YA

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Jan
24

Robot Round Up 24/01/14

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Hey everyone,

Round up time again, and this week we’re taking a look at our 100th book(!), Adam Christopher’s Hang Wire. We’ve been getting some great reviews, and there are also some cool competitions running to celebrate 100 Angry Robot books!

 

Hang Wire by Adam Christopher

We’ve had such a great response to Hang Wire, but before we dive into what you guys have been saying about it, let’s take a look at some of things Adam has been up to.

Hang Wire by Adam ChristopherAdam talks superheroes on the Reader/Writer podcast, and over at BRSBKBLOG, Peter Sutton asks him a few questions about Hang Wire and his writing. Hang Wire also gets a mention in SF Signal’s Mind Meld: Books We Can’t Wait to Read in 2014!

Meanwhile, we’re running a giveaway for Hang Wire  over on Goodreads, with ten copies to send to lucky winners! Adam is also running his own fantastic pre-order competition on his site, with plenty of goodies to be won.

But that’s not all! Want to win all 100 Angry Robot books? To celebrate the release of Hang Wire, our 100th book, readers of Tor.com in the US and Canada (excluding Quebec) can win a flash USB drive containing all 100 of our books (plus a few extra surprises). Enter over on Tor.com here. And for readers everywhere else, don’t worry – we have something coming for you very soon!

And don’t forget, Adam will be signing copies of Hang Wire (with special limited editions available at the event) at Forbidden Planet’s London Megastore at the launch party on Thursday 6th March, from 6 – 7pm!

Phew! On to the reviews…

“The sheer volume of ideas is dizzying… an enjoyably fast-paced read.”
- SFX Magazine.

“Christopher fulfils our expectations and more: just when we think the story couldn’t get any weirder, he adds a whole new layer of weird, bouncing from one unexpected moment of goofiness to another, keeping us stuck to our chairs until we think it’ll take an industrial-strength solvent to pry us loose. Days after finishing the book, you’ll still have a grin on your face.”
- Booklist Starred Review

“To put it simply, this is one of the best sci-fi novels in years. Try this one out, it’s a worthwhile experience and one that beats any number of Hollywood blockbusters for pure originality and panache. A fantastic read.”
Kafka’s Cage

“There’s only so much praise you can heap on a book, and I’m going to lay it on thick here. HANG WIRE is a damn cool book. It’s the perfect example of deep and well thought-out characterisation, diversification, multi dimensional plotting, and clever (and at times poetic) writing. ”
Just A Guy That Likes To Read

“The plot within Hang Wire is just as original as his previous work and like before, he loads it up on characters and ideas … it’s a fun novel with a hell of an interesting cast.”
EveryReadThing

“[Hang Wire] feels like an old story, but one told in a fresh and relevant way. Which to me means it is excellent storytelling. It could be read as almost anti-science or anti-science fiction even (anti- as in opposite, not against), reflecting past-times when horrors such as earthquakes and comets were explained by supernatural events … So, what is Hang Wire? A very good piece of storytelling. A damn fine read.”
Geek Syndicate

“Hang Wire tells a number of tales all at once. It’s a detective story, a horror, a little bit of science fiction and a lot of urban fantasy. It’s a heady mix and throwing all these elements together means Adam Christopher is able to keep things rolling along at a hell of a pace.”
The Taichung Bookworm

“An excellent read, Adam Christopher once again reminds us why he is your go-to writer for awesome urban fantasy as he crafts an unputdownable tale that makes Angry Robot’s 100th Novel an excellent read!”
- Bane of Kings, The Founding Fields

“It kept me on my toes and kept me wondering who it and they were. I also enjoyed the dash of mythology thrown into it and the sense of the mystical that the circus theme always brings.”
BookCharmed

“It’s an absorbing read … The pacing is really good: there was never a point where I could put it down and not wonder what was coming up next.”
The Bibliophibian

“The worldbuilding is light but effective and the plot runs along at a fair pace with some great imagery … Overall – being an Angry Robot book you expect it’ to be pacy and intelligent with good plotting and Christopher really delivers. Recommended.”
BRSBKBLOG

Jan
17

Robot Round Up 17/01/14

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Hi folks,

It’s round up time again and this week we’re taking a look at all the fabulous reviews we’ve been seeing for Chuck Wendig’s new Miriam Black book, The Cormorant. This is the third in the Miriam Black series, beginning with Blackbirds and Mockingbird. You’ve been loving this book! Here’s why:

 

The Cormorant by Chuck Wendig

The Cormorant by Chuck Wendig - Artwork by Joey Hi-Fi“Miriam’s story remains an undeniably addictive one, and I finished this in one sitting. Wendig’s writing is better than ever, and this series continues to surprise and terrify in equal measure.”
My Bookish Ways

“My immediate urge here is to just go on at length about how great this book was. And it was, I absolutely loved the hell out of ‘The Cormorant’”
Graeme’s SFF

Read an interview with Chuck on Cabin Goddess, where he talks The Cormorant, Miriam, and all things Chuck. And learn how to make The Miriam Negroni!

The Cormorant really feels like the book where Chuck Wendig decided to out-do himself. There’s something Tarantino-esque about the way he hunts down the extremes of darkness and violence and then kicks them just a little bit further down the road to blood-red insanity. It’s as if he was turning up the “Crazy” button, discovered it went all the way to 11, and then the button came off and it just kept escalating until, well, until the book was done. It’s a spectacular ride”
Tor.com

“Chuck Wendig writes a goddam good book … I really dug this book and dug what it did and I dug how it explored further and expanded on the ideas he built in the other books. It’s a great continuation of a really, really good storyline.”
Booked Podcast

“The third book in the Miriam Black series goes up another level. As per usual the humour is wickedly black. If you haven’t read this series yet jump on the band wagon now!”
- Bite The Book

“Wendig’s writing, as usual, is inordinately exquisite throughout this book. The master of the metaphor, Chuck paints scenes you can feel, a veritable Bob Ross on an LSD-laced speed binge. Characters pop out of the page, each voice unique to its owner, each owner colorful, meaningful, and truly existing in the world beyond the purpose they serve to the story.”
Tree is a Tree

“The acerbic wit of Miriam and the variety and ingenuity of her visions, which made the previous volumes such fun, are again in evidence, but Wendig takes the opportunity this time around to further explore Miriam’s personal history, in particular her relationship with her mother. Secrets are revealed and Miriam’s own perceptions and recollections are challenged in a series of scenes that illustrate the author has the skill for the tender character-based moments as well as the adrenaline pumping action scenes.”
- Ross Warren, This Is Horror

“[Chuck is] like a jazz drummer who just keeps riffing…it all comes tumbling out as if he was Jack Kerouac, cranked up on Benzedrine and writing “On the Road” on a single roll of paper without stopping from beginning to end. Is it clear yet that I think he’s a really good writer? Just checking.”
- Terry Irving, author of Courier

“If you like dark urban fantasies tinged with blood and murder, Wendig’s Miriam Black books are perfect for you. And if you think there’s no way you’d want to read them, I still urge you to try – you, like me, may find something that keeps you coming back for more in these novels.”
- Speculating on SpecFic

“What can I tell you about a book that I waited with bated breath for? A book that I stared longingly at the Amazon page over, dreaming that I could reach through and pluck it our of the sea of ones and zeroes. What can I tell you about the third book of a series that I have come to love so much they sit snuggled up against all my other favorite writers. I can tell you that this book was the best so far.”
- Adventures of a Military Housewriter

“I described the first Miriam book as GrittyDarkFast!, so I suppose I should call The Cormorant GrittierDarkerFaster!, but that doesn’t take its full measure. This book is brutal and I finished it feeling like a dirty, over-wrung dishtowel. Can we go again?”
- CheffoJeffo

“This is the best Miriam Black book so far … I have to imagine that the author has a blast writing this character. Miriam has such a desire to make things right, but always seems to get in the way of her good intentions. I’m very excited about the promise of what is to come in the fourth book.”
- iamjanesheart

“Here’s the deal: I love these books because I’ve never read anything like them. Miriam Black is not just an anti-hero, she’s a take-no-shit, hell-talking, bad-ass motherfucker. And that is rare in a female protagonist.”
- Everyday Jetsam

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Jan
09

Robot Round Up: Best of 2013

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Happy New Year everyone!

It’s our first round up of 2014, so we thought we’d take a look at your favourites from last year. What got everyone talking in 2013?

 

Your Best of 2013

 

The Lives of Tao by Wesley ChuFirst off, The Lives of Tao by Wesley Chu has made it into a few of your favourites piles, and was even voted into the top ten science fiction books in the Goodreads Choice Awards! Badass Book Reviews included it on their Best Science Fiction of 2013 list. My Bookish Ways and Staffer’s Book Review both also named it a top debut of 2013. Justin of Staffer’s Book Review says:

8 months ago I called The Lives of Tao ‘the most fun I’ve had this year.’ Fast forward to today and it’s still true. He [Chu] succeeds because he’s got a clever voice, full of subtle wit and kinetic pacing.” (Staffer’s Book Review)

The reviews for this book have been phenomenal, so it’s definitely one series to catch up with if you missed it!

Three by Jay Posey is another favourite. Jasper of Book Plank says: It is not only the world that makes Three interesting, the characters are spot on and only further help make this story a winner, and Tabitha of My Shelf Confessions says: You seriously do NOT want to miss this debut! We agree!

The Big Reap by Chris F. Holm, design by Amazing15Next up is The Big Reap by Chris HolmThe Founding Fields and My Bookish Ways both included it in their top books of 2013 lists, and both bloggers, S.J. and Heather, over at Snobbery picked it to top their list as one of their two Super Best Books of 2013! Wow!

Now, let’s just talk for a moment about Between Two Thorns and the Split Worlds series by Emma NewmanBetween Two Thorns was a hit with so many of you, and not only that, but it was also listed in NetGalley’s Top Ten of the Year! The Founding Fields, My Bookish Ways, and A Fantastical Librarian are just a few of the blogs that included it in their best of lists. Justin at Staffer’s Book Review also gave the gorgeous cover by Sarah J. Coleman a mention in his Best Cover Art post.

The Mad Scientist’s Daughter by Cassandra Rose Clarke also receives some great mentions in your best of lists, with characters that are “vibrant and real” (Badass Book Reviews). Mieneke of A Fantastic Librarian saying this about it:

“The Mad Scientist’s Daughter is stunning. A gorgeous exploration of love, the ability to feel it and other emotions, and the lies we tell ourselves in order to attain happiness that probes the border between human and AI to see how far they stretch.” (A Fantastical LibrarianRead More→

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Dec
13

Robot Round Up 13/12/13

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Hi everyone,

It’s Round Up time again, and this time we’ve got a selection of our recent titles that we really feel you should take a look at.

 

Heartwood by Freya Robertson

 

Heartwood by Freya RobertsonFirst up, Heartwood by Freya Robertson, the first in an exciting new epic fantasy series: The Elemental Wars! You can read interviews with Freya on SF Signal, Civilian Reader, Terribleminds and My Bookish Ways. On Searching for Superwomen she talks video games, and on Bookworm Blues we find out what speculative fiction has taught her. Read More→

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Dec
06

Robot Round-Up 06/12/13

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Hey folks, today’s Robot Round-Up is a celebration of January 2014′s coming titles, and we have two exciting books to share with you! First up, the much anticipated The Cormorant, the third in Chuck Wendig’s fantastic Miriam Black series. Readers of the first two books loved the dark, punchy style (“fast, ferocious, sharp as a switchblade and fucking fantastic” – Lauren Beukes, author of Zoo City and The Shining Girls) and I can’t wait to see what you all think of the third book. Read More→

Oct
01

Robot Round-Up 01.10.13

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Hey, it’s Leah here, Angry Robot’s new intern. Today’s Robot Round-Up is a celebration of October’s upcoming titles, and we have some brilliant ones to show you. First of all, keep your eyes peeled for our Special Edition post coming soon on Ramez Naam’s amazing second novel, Crux.  Cory Doctorow, author of Little Brother and Pirate Cinema has described Crux as “A blisteringly paced technothriller that dives deeper and even better into the chunky questions raised by Nexus. This is a fabulous book, and it ends in a way that promises at least one more. Count me in.” If this has whet your appetite, both books are out in shops now!

All is Fair by Emma NewmanThe first of the October titles is All is Fair by Emma NewmanThe third in Emma’s successful The Split Worlds  series. With many followers, readers are eagerly anticipating Emma’s next instalment. Here’s a sneak peak at some of the reviews:

• ’Newman’s complex magical world is as inventive as it is charming, and this latest “Split Worlds” story contains deceit, deception and intrigue in all the right places.’ Kirkus Reviews 

  • •  ’The series is Changeling the Lost meets Downton Abbey as feuding families tied to mad Fae patrons scheme in the world between ours and Faerie, and in those as well.’ Three Things to Read, Watch and Use

•  ’I love the plot of this series, as there are so many interlacing stories going on that you feel like a part of something much bigger… one of my favourite reads of the year.’ Book Chick City
•  ’There’s lots of action in this one, but there’s still all of the court intrigue and wonderful characterization that I’ve come to expect from the series… the ending leaves plenty of hints of things to come, and I can’t wait.’ My Bookish Ways
• ’This is a fun book, adding more characters and different perspectives on the Nether and the Split Worlds, plenty of humour and excitement… I want to know more about the world Emma Newman has created, and I’m not ready to say goodbye to these characters yet!’ Vicky Thinks
•’I do love the unique world Emma has created in this series, where two cultures collide, and there’s some great bits of humour.’  Curiosity Killed the Bookworm

This title is released on the 3rd of October (UK) and the 23rd of September (US/CAN)

Our next October title is Prince Thief by David TallermanThis is the third in David’s Tales of Easie Damasco series and our Prince Thief, by David Tallermanreviews have been singing its praise:

•  ’With action, humour, adventures, and giants, The Tales of Easie Damasco is an enjoyable series which fans of fantasy and heist stories are sure to enjoy.’ The Arched Doorway

• ’This series is solid adventure fantasy, but with a twist. The stock thief in Tallerman’s hands is more than just a generic character. He’s unique, a fresh and original creation with enough familiarity to him that readers won’t be put off.’ Adventures Fantastic

Praise for Giant Thief

•  ’Damasco resembles a landlocked version of Jack Sparrow … The atypical backdrop, self-aware style and downplaying of magics bring to mind the contemporary fantasies of Scott Lynch and Joe Abercrombie.’ SFX Magazine
  ’If you’re up for a fun, fast-paced adventure featuring rogues, giants and lots of fighting, you won’t want to miss it!’ A Fantastical Librarian

Praise for Crown Thief

•  ’It’s a fun romp in a dark fantasy world and when you add to this great prose, top notch prose and combat to keep you glued, all in all this is a great second book for the reader to enjoy.’ Falcata Times
•  ’If you haven’t met Easie Damasco, you should. You’ll be glad you did.’ Adventures Fantastic

This title is released on the 3rd of October (UK) and the 24th of September (US/CAN)

Seven Forges by James A. Moore, artwork by Alejandro Colucci

Our final Angry Robot title for October is  Seven Forges by  James A. Moore

•  ’Unexpected plot twists, shocking revelations, total chaos. Everything I thought I was signing on for when I picked up this book, I got.’ The Bibliosanctum

• ’This is fantasy on the scale of Terry Brooks or Brandon Sanderson… If you’re a fan of fantasy, you’ll definitely want to check out SEVEN FORGES. It is a solid, well-written addition to the genre, and I’m looking forward to see what Moore does next.’ Shattered Ravings

•  ’I finished Seven Forges in four nights, staying up later than I should to do so.  It’s not often I’ll stop and reread a scene, but I did more than once. I’m looking forward to see where Moore takes the story next.’ Adventures Fantastic

•  ”An excellent, enjoyable, and thoroughly entertaining fantasy debut into a new world of swords and sorcery, complete with romance, intrigue, and danger.” Attack of the Books

•  I thought this was really intriguing, it’s a fast paced story and fairly short for a novel of this type of scope… I will definitely pick up the next novel to see what happens in this world. Lynn’s Book Blog

•  ’Wow, that twist. In some ways I think I should have seen it coming, and I kind of did, but Seven Forges just lulled me into security and BAM! Craziness!… I  applaud a book that is willing to go as crazy realistic as Seven Forges did with that plot twist. I would very much like to read another story in the Seven Forges world.’ On Starships and Dragon Wings

This title is released on the 4th of October (UK) and 24th of September (US/CAN).

Enjoy these, folks!

 

Jun
28

Robot Round-Up 28.06.13

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What a busy few weeks it’s been here at Robot HQ; so busy in fact, that I’ve been shamefully slow since my last Round-Up! But what better to cheer up a rainy Friday (in Nottingham, at least) than a good look back over our recent highlights:

© 2013 Drake Photography HD, New York

© 2013 Drake Photography HD, New York

Let’s start with yesterday’s exciting news that Michael Boatman has become the latest AR author! If you missed the release, check out Lee’s announcement here. Click through for all the info on Michael, his titles Last God Standing and Who Wants to be the Prince of Darkness?

This month we’ve released two titles: Madeline Ashby‘s superb sequel to vN, iD, and also Paul S. Kemp‘s second outing with Egil and Nix, A Discourse in Steel. Here’s the big splash from launch day;  since then, they’ve both been kept in a dungeon, slaves to their computers busy with blog posts, interviews, and also kept happy with rave reviews. To wit:

iD by Madeline Ashby• Bibliotropic Review on Madeline’s iD: “Ashby has a wonderful imagination, an eye for detail, and characters that I don’t want to part from. From the beginning of the first book to the end of the second, I was hooked, and I’m eagerly looking forward to anything that Ashby does in the future.”

“It really is a modern I, Robot, but with a lot more grit, moral depth, and more interesting prose. Madeline Ashby ought to be seen as one of the big new names in science fiction.” Hardcover Wonderland

• Madeline’s blog tour featured interviews and blog posts, and she’s a rare beast that always manages to say something fresh and new with each stop:
• Madeline speaks out on the SFWA Scandal on Dark Matter Fanzine in a piece brilliantly entitled, ‘Stalin, Playboy, and Lady Writers’; talks to Civilian Reader about how to make Non-Humans Seem Human; 
• John Scalzi featured Madeline on Whatever‘s The Big Idea, and it’s a moving read: on facing fears, on telling the universe “to fuck right off and die”, and about living through the impossible. Read it.
• A Fantastical Librarian and My Bookish Ways have great interviews with Madeline, as does The Qwillery whilst Madeline faced up to Ten Questions About iD with Chuck Wendig, and My Shelf Confessions was lucky enough to nab Javier for a chat!
• Cheryl Morgan recently met up with Madeline and they sat down to discuss iD, and how Madeline uses robots to ask interesting questions about gender.
• SFSignal featured vN for a recent review and had this to say: ”Unrelenting and surprising conflict drives a fast-paced read; genuine, human-robot dystopia; powerful character arcs; evokes series addiction.” If you haven’t already read vN, get it and you might as well get iD at the same time…I doubt you’ll want to wait between books!

A Discourse In Steel by Paul S. Kemp• Last night Paul took part in an AMA on Reddit and go there to see what kinds of dirt they had him dish up!
• The fantastic cover, by Lee Gibbons, rightly gathered attention pre-launch, such as on Graeme’s SFF
• “Kemp gives us a great fast paced romp packed with action and with enough char­ac­ter and world build­ing to sat­isfy with­out slow­ing any­thing down.” I agree, Eoghann.com! And check out these other amazing reviews:
• ”This is adventure fantasy at its finest…Kemp is a superb writer.  If you enjoy sword and sorcery, adventure, and nonstop action, this is the book for you.” Adventures Fantastic

The Founding Fields: “Egil and Nix back once again kicking serious ass in this sequel”

• Silver Pen Scribe: “enjoyable ride of pure fun fantasy.”
• Being A Big Sandwich: It is in the characters, particularly Egil and Nix, that Kemp shines and draws the reader in…The interplay between the two is well-done, and their friendship is the bedrock of the story.”
• Kobold Press: “This book has all the elements that fans of sword and sorcery should enjoy…The characters are deep and fun to get to know, the story is interesting, and the action is top shelf.”
• Odd Engine: “filled with new magic and mayhem that makes it a truly enjoyable read.”
• Mikel Andrews: ”This is the fantasy you’ve been craving.. If you’ve been dying for some real originality in the fantasy realm – with a scene of revenge that would make even Kick-Ass’ Hit Girl do a double-take – then Discourse in Steel is your next stop.”

Three, by Jay Posey, artwork by Stephen Mayer-RassowA forthcoming title that is receiving a lot of attention – and do stay tuned for Jay’s impressive blog tour and a cool tour competition – is Three, the debut by renowned games writer Jay Posey. Take a look at some of these couple of early reviews:

• The Book Plank: ”Three is a great start into a new series. The post-apocalyptic world that Jay Posey created in Three is brilliantly constructed, it’s just chock-full of the cool stuff, futuristic gadgets (guns and the like), augmented people and not forget the Weir.”
• Book Realms: “The book has the hard-edged, gritty feel of postapocalyptic fiction. The dialog is terse; the action sequences pound along. But don’t think you’ve escaped into a world without tenderness. It’s there, even if in some cases its encased in armor and eclipsed by the need to survive.”
• If I could only show you the early reviews that haven’t been published yet…but not long now! Three, the first title in the Legends of the Duskwalker series is out in the US & ebook on 30 July and in the UK and RoW on 1 August.

The Big Reap by Chris F. Holm, design by Amazing15Our other August release is Chris F. Holm‘s third instalment in the Collector SeriesThe Big Reap, and take a look at some of the exciting pre-release reviews:

• Book Snobbery: “The Big Reap is the most ambitious of Holm’s Collector stories so far, and the payoff at the end is huge.  HUGE”
• Tolerably Smart: “Book Three was a game changer much to my enjoyment”
• Raging Biblioholism: ”Smart, funny and unassuming… Our world is a better place with Sam Thornton in it.”
• Every Read Thing: ”Sam is quickly becoming one of my favorite characters. While he carries with him the attitude of a blockbuster movie action star, he’s also a tragic character at heart. In my opinion, this is Holm’s finest work yet.”

Any Other Name by Emma Newman, Artwork by Sarah J. ColemanThe tireless Emma Newman and her Split Worlds books continue to leave reviewers and readers alike feeling all kinds of happy; take a look at these:

A Fantastical Librarian: ”I think I loved Any Other Name even more than Between Two Thorns, if that’s possible. [Any Other Name is] engaging, funny, romantic, and imaginative and placed Emma Newman solidly on my must-read list of writers. I can’t wait for the conclusion to this story in October, when All is Fair is released. In the meantime, I think I’ll go and reread some of the short stories set in the Split Worlds.”

Thoughts from the Hearthfire ”Emma Newman definitely knows what she is doing…In short, great characters, fabulous settings, complex plots, resolved threads within each book with plenty to arc across titles as well. I wholeheartedly recommend it!”

Kindle-aholic’s Book Pile made me giggle with this one – it’s so true: “You know you are getting into a book when you want to pull characters aside for a little chat. Will, you are an idiot. An idiot with good intentions, but you pissed me the hell off. Max, you need to listen to your gargoyle more. Mr. Sorcerer – there is something so very off about you. I feel some good bits of secrets spilling in book 3. I gave up sleep to finish this book and was very glad I did.”
• And if you want to read more about Emma, check out this SFX interview! Don’t forget that Emma also has some really fun stuff on her website. You can sign up for free Split Worlds short stories. Also, there is her Three Wishes campaign, as well as her new podcasts, Tea and Jeopardy. Emma’s now up to Podcast 6 which is with Karina Cooper; previous hostages guests have included Chuck Wendig, Sarah Pinborough, Paul Cornell, Jennifer Udden, and Dave Bradley. So, grab yourself a mug of tea and settle down with Emma for some mild peril!

The Lives of Tao by Wesley ChuMike, our fantastic North American Sales & Marketing Manager, and I had a great chat with Wesley Chu this week about all things The Deaths of Tao; for everyone anxiously awaiting the next instalment of Roen and Tao’s adventures… T-minus 4 months! To those who haven’t yet read The Lives of Tao, check out these reviews and prey tell me, how you’ve missed this summer blockbuster?

• Fantasy Book Review: “The Lives of Tao is a fun book with a lot of energy and it really worked for me. Full of action, adventure, martial arts, gunplay, and large quantities of geeky goodness.”
• Sarah Says Read joins the now-squadron-sized army of those who all “want a Prophus alien living in my brain!” She loved it so much, there are bullet points to describe how (which I love!) but the summary says it all: “You guys, this book was just AWESOME. I literally don’t have a single complaint about it. It was an action-packed, fun-filled joy ride and I can’t wait to see what’s next in store for Roen and Tao.”
Not a Natural Writer is certainly a Natural Reader and has this to say on The Lives of Tao: “The writing style is very easy to get into, and the story moves along at a fair old lick. The actions scenes in particular are very well crafted, with a great sense of motion, excitement and tension.”

My Bookish Ways: “It certainly makes me think that there might something in all of us that can make us great (even if it’s not an alien being), and it’s Roen’s humility, and yes, bravery, in the midst of a very extreme chain of events that makes this book what it is: one of the freshest, most fun debuts I’ve read in quite a while! I can’t wait to find out what’s next for Roen and Tao!”

Vinx Books: “There’s a dash of romance, plenty of action and the plot carries you along but with nice variations in pace so it isn’t all go go go. It is all combined very well and I really appreciate that the violence is not romanticised or gratuitous. Roen’s reactions to the fighting is very human and I think brings a moment of contemplation.”
• Tiffy Fit: “imaginative, enjoyable, wondrous. ”

And if you’re not all Chu-ed out with those rave reviews, check out what the great man himself has to say:
• 52 Book Reviews Interview
Only The Best Sci-Fi
Civilian Reader
Examiner.com

The Blue Blazes by Chuck Wendig, Art by Joey Hi-FiChuck Wendig continues to own the internet, largely because he’s too scary to stop*, but hey, it works out well for our books. Take a look at all of this goodness:

• “Wendig’s filthy dialogue and layered characters mean that it’s never less than raucously entertaining.” SFX, August 2013
• Book Chick City: “The Blue Blazes is one hell of a read, with a complex cast of morally grey characters. It’s a heart-stopping ride from beginning to end. I think it is my stand out book of the year so far.”
The Tattooed Book: “With superbly vivid characters, ballsy action and a ton of twists and turns Chuck Wendig hits home with another all round enjoyable novel.”
The Qwillery: “If you are looking for something well written and verging towards horror, then I urge you to read The Blue Blazes. I would advise not to read too close to bedtime, however, without checking under the bed a few times first!”
Fangs for the Fantasy: “This book is stylistically excellent. It’s thematically excellent. The writing is amazing. The characterisation is awesome. The world is incredible.”

All Things Urban Fantasy: “Think Neil Gaiman’s Neverwhere written as a mob book…I’m kicking myself for not checking out Wendig’s work before now. Don’t make the same mistake I did.”

• My Bookish Ways: “The Blue Blazes is something very different, very twisted and very, very good. You’ll have lots of fun-I know I did!”
• With a shout-0ut to the fantastic Joey Hi-Fi cover, CheffoJeffo also says: “A Rollicking, Riotous Rampage…The Blue Blazes is the most fun I have had in years.”

For Chuck’s dulcet tones, here’s some handy interview links:

• Interview with Mahvesh Murad on CityFM89
• Podcast with NerdStravagana
• Eric Christensen

If you live, or will be, in Brooklyn on July 17, be sure to call to Word and see Chuck with Strange Chemistry author T.L. Costa as they consider the current state of speculative fiction, in both YA and adult. There’ll also be a signing and a Q&A.

You’d think that would be enough of our authors working on taking over the world, but nope, we’ve got all of these who have also been busy…and that’s the way we like them:

The Eighth Court by Mike Shevdon, cover art by John CoulthartMike Shevdon‘s series, The Courts of the Feyre, comes to a conclusion with The Eighth Court, and the mighty Tim Ward at SFSignal has this to say: “Fascinating magic; powerful and scheming villains; engaging and surprising mystery; epic conflict; dramatic and sympathetic conclusion to character arcs.”

• No More Grumpy Bookseller: “The Courts of the Feyre series is a win in every way in my humble opinion – the world, the characters, the stories, the setting, the history…it’s been a wild and crazy entertaining ride!”

The Bookman Histories omnibus, by Lavie Tidhar - artwork by John Coulthart• Lavie Tidhar‘s Omnibus collection of The Bookman Histories was released earlier in the year and Black Gate certainly recommend buying up this trilogy: “this is a guy who is clearly going places. Ignore him at your peril.” The Bookman Histories contains The BookmanCamera Obscura, and The Great Game and is available in the US and ebook.

Ramez Naam We’re fast approaching publication date for Ramez Naam‘s follow-up to NexusCrux, and here’s an early review from the IEET: “I advise readers to start with Nexus, but then to pick right up with Crux. Both books are excellent, thoughtful, and fast-paced. They are worth your time, and will leave you thinking hard about some core future questions.”

With the excitement building up towards the release of Crux, we were delighted to announce we’ve signed Ramez up for a third book, which will be released in late 2014, and here’s LitStack reporting on the deal.

Empire State by Adam ChristopherThe Age Atomic, by Adam Christopher, art & design by Will StaehleIf Reggie Lutz had this to say about Empire State: ” He makes the reader feel that we understand and recognize the place we are in the fiction…which makes the plot complications and world-instability issues contained therein all the more effective.” and Fantasy Faction say this about The Age Atomic: ”[Since Empire StateAdam Christopher has grown as a writer and the growth shines through here, his prose has become stronger, his characters more real; his ideas, settings and themes bright and full of depth…he’s grown to a stylish and exciting writer, with ideas that are full of adventure and mystery.”, how damn good does that make both Empire State and The Age Atomic!

And on that note, I’m outta here – well as far as the café for lunch, but you know what I mean.

Happy Friday, everyone!

Caroline

 

 



*Chuck is the nicest man in the world. Fact.**

 

 

 

**I’ve never met him – but, so I hear.

May
17

Robot Round-Up 17.05.13

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Gather round drones, and check out what has been amazing couple of weeks for all things robotic and brilliant…actually makes us a little bit less angry, but don’t worry as it won’t last. Prepare yourselves…it’s a long ‘un.

vN by Madeline Ashby, cover Martin Bland/Spyroteknik

I think it’s only right that we start off with the great news from the US, that Angry Robot has been shortlisted at the Locus Awards for Best Publisher. Not only that but Madeline Ashby‘s vN has been shortlisted in the Best First Fiction category, and fellow Angry Robot author Aliette de Bodard is up for Best Novella and Best Short Story! Couldn’t be better timing with Book Two in the Machine Dynasty, iD, coming very shortly! Check out Lee’s post on this good news.

 

 

The Lives of Tao by Wesley ChuWesley Chu continues to take the world by storm with Tao & Roen in The Lives of Tao with reviews, interviews, and blog posts popping up left, right, and centre.

Reviews:

Normal in London loved the book: “There are comic moments, there are tender moments and there are moments where I wondered what I would do if I had an alien inside me, and moments where I wished I did as it might push me into doing stuff! The climax was especially strong, and somewhat unexpected. And it has left me wanting more Roen & Tao.” There’s definitely a business opportunity for Wes if he can provide aliens for all the reviewers looking for their own Tao!
Dangerous Dan awards Tao “four easy stars”  believing the “ending[...]was perfect for the story and left it open-ended enough for future adventures of Roen and Tao.”
Always Unmended don’t just focus on the fact that “Chu’s writing is strong, and his ability to write tragic, heart-rending scenes into such a fun, easy story is proof that he’s found his calling as a writer” but also believe we can all learn something from Roen: [the book] ”contains inspirational advice that is bound to make readers reflect on their own lives. There is much about being the person you want to be and not making excuses to let yourself fail. Much as the practice of Tao is The Way of life, the character of Tao shows Roen the way to live fully. And isn’t that something we could all use a little help with?” Now. Go out there and live your live…after the pizza dinner, it is Friday evening after all.
• For a review with a spin, check out Richard’s rhyming review; I can’t even pull a line from it, it needs to be read in whole…what are you waiting for? Shooo!
• Feathers & Tea get their review off to a great start, calling Chu’s debut “another triumph from the Angry Robot publishing stable”, why thank you! It continues thusly: “Chu’s writing is sparingly skillful [and the] key premise is novel and handled deftly, the transition of Roen from bumbler to Commander is a joy to read, and the book is as laced with humour and flashes of poignancy as it is with action scenes”
• The Lives of Tao has even managed to impress the self-proclaimed cross-genre wary 42 Webs! “The Lives of Tao is one of those good books that pulls off the mash-up perfectly.  We get the full sci-fi feeling combined with the spy genre without either side getting diluted or ignored.  We get the full effect and in turn get a character we care about.  Roen becomes the mix between James Bond and Ezio Auditore da Firenze (Assassin Creed 2, Brotherhood, Revelations).”
The Author - Wesley Chu• “The most fun I’ve had all year” Staffer’s Book Review
• Mike over on Stuff and/or Junk calls Roen & Tao ”a sci-fi action Odd Couple” – I think the most apt description I’ve heard yet!
• Wes & the Prophus’ global domination continues with i109 proclaiming The Lives of Tao one of the Astounding Summer Reads!
• The Lives of Tao is ”top notch entertainment” and “the perfect summer read” The Eloquent Page
• The wonderful 52 Book Reviews allow no excuses for anyone not reading Chu’s amazing debut: “Chu’s cunning and hilarious mash-up of comedy, coming of age drama, espionage thriller, and science fiction has something for everyone.”
Matthew Scott Baker is very excited about Tao! It’s “very clever with fun/deadly characters and a high-paced plot. Be ready to drop your social life for a few days, though…you will definitely want to use your free time finishing this one up!”
Bandelier Girl Reads Everything is short and sweet with Tao: “A nice mash-up of genres that moves the reader thru the story with humor and interesting characters. Recommend.”

Blog Posts/Interviews:

• Wes has been interviewed on many a website, and get yourself over to Toonari PostSci-Fi Fan Letter, and Bastard Books…for a mammoth, brilliant, read which also includes a giveaway!
• Check out Stellar Four for Roen’s drink of choice, and Wes talks about Aliens on Dribble of Ink.
• Wes had a guest post with Mary Robinette Kowal which you can catch here

Events:

• Wes has also been busy with some fun & games and with the coolest cake ever, launched The Lives of Tao in Chicago. Take a look at the photos on Wes’ Facebook page
• If you’re in Chicago – or will be – on May 19, you can catch Wes on a panel at Open Books: 213 W. Institute Place Chicago, IL 60610 (1 block north of Chicago & Franklin el stop.) See the Open Books Website for further details.
• If you can’t make Chicago, Wes will be at WisCon May 24-27, on 4 panels no less, and for more info: check it out here
• And if Tao & Roen hadn’t provided Wes with enough to celebrate, didn’t he only go and win the April Debut Author Challenge Cover Wars over at The Qwillery! Thanks again to Argh! Oxford for the great cover! Here’s an interview The Qwillery also did with him.

The Age Atomic, by Adam Christopher, art & design by Will Staehle

• Adam Christopher‘s The Age Atomic has a very cool video review over on I’m Ellie Ann
• Paper Mages is putting future reading trust in the hands of Adam, a very wise move, whilst also praising Christopher’s dynamic characters!
• Listen in to Adam’s radio i/v on City FM 89 here
• And, it might be belated posting on my behalf, but check out the Bane of Kings review over on The Founding Fields: “A wonderful novel, The Age Atomic proves that Adam Christopher can write sequels just as well as anyone. The most fun read of 2013 so far, and one of the best.”

Between Two Thorns by Emma Newman, March 2013Any Other Name by Emma Newman, Artwork by Sarah J. ColemanThe wonderful Emma Newman has had the internet all a flutter between reviews for Between Two Thorns, advance talk on Any Other Name, the wonderful Three Wishes, and also her new podcast, Tea & Jeopardy!

Reviews for Between Two Thorns & Any Other Name:

• ”JK Rowling meets Georgette Heyer ” so say the Guardian along with praising how Emma “renders the Split Worlds with verve and an infectious sense of fun, and presents in Cathy a strong and personable heroine.” Get in, Between Two Thorns!
• “Between Two Thorns is in essence a mystery, with a dash of magic, suspense and intrigue combining with just a touch of romance, polictics and feminism to freshen it up a bit” Boy, do Vinx Books love Between Two Thorns! Vinx also highlights Em’s amazing short stories based in The Split Worlds, and the Three Wishes, thanks Vinx!
• Uncorked Thoughts give Between Two Thorns 4 out of 5 stars, and declare the ”story…an Austinesque fantasy, filling every chapter with action. I loved learning about this new world and am looking forward to sinking my teeth into the next book!” You don’t have long to wait, Leah!
• A Writer’s Sidequest is another eagerly anticipating the release of Any Other Name, having fallen in love with Between Two Thorns!
• 5 out of 5 stars. Why, thank you very much Geek Syndicate. “A word of warning, make sure it is somewhere comfortable though as once you start this magical book, you won’t be going anywhere until you finish it. Absolutely brilliant.” Just one of the many excellent proclamations from them, and rightly so!
• Here’s a review for the forthcoming Any Other Name from My Dear Bibliophage who call it “enchanting, shocking, and well-crafted”

Interviews:

SQ Magazine have a great interview with our Em; find out what she thinks about the challenges facing female speculative fiction writers in today’s publishing world, amongst much more. Emma also has a short-story in SQ, here
• Keep an eye on Emma’s Split World interviews page for all her oot-and-abooot happenings!

Three Wishes:

• If you haven’t heard about Emma’s fantastic new project Three Wishes, you’re missing out on your chance to have some magical wishes come true! Get involved: make your wish but also try grant somebody else…it’s a magical Pay it Forward, and we like it! Read more here.
Urban Fantasy Land have definitely got on board with Three Wishes and are urging everyone to be “part of something very exciting, wonderful, and of course, magical!”

Tea & Jeopardy:

Geek Planet Online are very excited to have Emma onboard with her new podcast, and rightly so, it’s great! Check out the first podcast with our very own Chuck Wendig: Tea & Jeopardy

The Blue Blazes by Chuck Wendig, Art by Joey Hi-FiBlackbirds, by Chuck WendigChuck has kept the web busy with both Mookie Pearl and Miriam Black:

The Blue Blazes:

• For something “dark, gritty and fun” Three Crow Press recommend Chuck‘s first Mookie Pearl novel, The Blue Blazes. True that.
• “Wendig has taken the cast of Goodfellas and dragged them, kicking and screaming into a fantasy reality of New York, opened up the playground and let them run loose”, so says Wilder’s Book Review, who continues: “The dialogue is crisp and flows quickly, with a dark humour which Wendig relishes throughout…It’s a style which Wendig is well-known for and as my first Chuck Wendig novel, I found it to be a real breath of fresh air in a subgenre which sometimes feels a little stuffy and manufactured.”
• Odd Engine  starts a glowing 4 star review with a shout-out to Joey Hi-Fi for the amazing cover, and continues by praising the “punchy dialog, snappy prose, and a gritty narrative voice”, calling The Blue Blazes “inventive, edgy, and a joy to read”
Elf Machines from Hyperspace (what a cool name, and you’re welcome for the ARC!) after one book has declared Chuck’s writing “imaginative, funny, profound, tough, and poetic all at once” and they ain’t wrong!

Blackbirds:

Blackbirds is “a bit fucking wrong” (a quote courtesy of Miss BookCunt) which for PublishThings sums up the second Miriam Black novel perfectly!
The Cheape Book links Blackbirds with the perfect director: “This book begs to be done as a movie by Tarantino if he hasn’t already” Are ya listening, Quentin?

Finally, The 52 Review has a great interview with Mr Wendig, and if you’re an aspiring writer you definitely want to check out when he says about finding your own voice

A Discourse In Steel by Paul S. KempThe Hammer and the Blade, by Paul S KempWith good timing as A Discourse in Steel‘s publication date (25 June / 4 July) is fast approaching, Geeks versus Nerds are talking all things Paul S. Kemp and The Hammer and the Blade: “This book is wonderful, funny and exciting with a pinch of spine shivering evil added in for flavor.”

 

 

The Mad Scientist's Daughter by Cassandra Rose Clarke - Feb 2013

 

The beautiful story that is Cassandra Rose Clarke‘s The Mad Scientist’s Daughter has certainly made an impression on ScienceFiction.com, who call it a “fantastically written science fiction novel about love and society”.

 

 

 

 

Apr
06

Robot Round-Up, 06.04.13

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Damn, April already? Isn’t this year flying past? But also, that means that it’s British launch week for the wonderful The Age Atomic, the terrifying Black Feathers and the incontinence-inducing hilarity of The Marching Dead.

Black Feathers by Joseph D'Lacey, April 2013That man Joseph D’Lacey has been hither and thither promoting his book in the UK, and many thanks to Blackwells and Big Green for letting us hijack your stores. Black Feathers is getting raves everywhere right now:
• The mighty Tor.com said the novel is “an exceptional piece of apocalyptic/horror/fantasy fiction”, which is true.
Upcoming4Me rather agreed: “a refreshing take on the whole post-apocalyptic genre and a great introduction to the writing of Joseph D’Lacey”.
SciFi Now magazine gave it a half page and said the novel “artfully weaves a tale of destruction and rebirth”.
• Head to Popcorn Reads for a review and a chance to win an advance proof: “I loved this novel, despite the fact that it gave me chills and some bad dreams.”
• … or Book Bones Buffy, who also has a proof to give away, to celebrate “a story that is irresistibly addicting.”
• Fantasy blog Draumr Kopa recommended Black Feathers “to anyone who wants a more intelligent story, with lots of secrets and mystery, people who don’t mind a little thinking while reading.”
And Then I Read a Book were blown away by the book: “It terrified me, made me angry, made me sad, transported me somewhere new and yet strangely familiar, and hasn’t left my head yet. It combines mythology, folktale, shamanism, coming of age and apocalyptic themes to create something very special.”
• And Stanley Eriks concluded by saying: “Black Feathers is an original and intelligent apocalypse story. It’s a myth-filled fable of the end of the world on an individual basis. It’s a coming-of-age story set on a cruel and broken Earth.”

The Marching Dead by Lee Battersby, April 2013The inimitable Lee Battersby has returned, bringing hapless half-dead Marius don Hellespont with him in The Marching Dead, the sequel to The Corpse-Rat King:
Kate Of Mind blog loved loved loved it, giving it “all the stars” and saying “With this sequel, Battersby kicked up everything I loved about the first novel by a notch or two – world-building, storytelling, hilarity, and most of all, characters who just made me punch the air over and over again, usually while laughing.”
• Don’t forget you can get a taster in the form of an exclusive short story, Lying Like Cards, right here on this very website.

The Age Atomic, by Adam Christopher, art & design by Will StaehleThe tireless Adam Christopher was out and about promoting The Age Atomic, the two-fisted follow-up to Empire State. Thanks to Forbidden Planet in London for a fab launch event this Thursday – we rocked the joint, again.
• The book was an April pick for Kirkus Reviews, which was nice.
A Writer’s Sidequest said it is “a glorious and joyous ode to the pulp science fiction of old. Awesome fun, from start to finish, just straight up, pure entertainment.”
• Adam was interviewed on My Bookish Ways, who also have a copy to give away too, so hurry over there!.

The Lives of Tao by Wesley ChuUpcoming debut author Wesley Chu continues to wow folks with the breakneck thrillride that is The Lives of Tao, out in May.
• Wes had a guest post on The Qwillery this week to talk about the first time a novel really spoke to him.
I Will Read Books had this to say: “By the end of the books I was close to tears, which proves my emotional investment in the characters and their fates. I wish every book made me care about the characters as much as The Lives of Tao.”
• Over at Tome of Geek, Wes managed to overcome their usual aversion of genre mash-up novels: “We get the full sci-fi feeling combined with the spy genre without either side getting diluted or ignored. We get the full effect and in turn get a character we care about.”

Between Two Thorns by Emma Newman, March 2013Emma Newman, despite losing her wisdom teeth this week (wishing you a speedy recovery, Em), was still full of the joys of Between Two Thorns.
• Her guest post on The Creative Penn talked charmingly about urban fantasy, as a genre, its influences and its many strands.
• And finally, blog heavyweights Fantasy Faction gave the book nine stars out of ten, saying: “If you like a bit of fairy magic, the juxtaposition between ancient and modern, here and there, and you don’t mind being left in suspense for a good few months, you’ll really enjoy it.” (They’re going to be overjoyed when they hear that the sequel, Any Other Name, will be out in June then!)

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Mar
28

Robot Round-Up, 28.03.13

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Hello and welcome to a double-bank-holiday Easter special Robot Round-Up. No choccie eggs or anything, just lots and lots of luvverly links to some Red Hot Angry Robot Action. Without further ado:

Black Feathers by Joseph D'Lacey, April 2013It’s US/Ebook release week for Black Feathers, the first part of Joseph D’Lacey‘s post-eco-apocalyptic dark fantasy duology, The Black Dawn and it’s fantastic to see a whole gang of reviewers (of clearly impeccable taste, we might add) getting right behind the book:
• Chris at All Things Urban Fantasy, said: “D’Lacey does an excellent job interweaving the two narratives and the story moves along at a brisk pace … D’Lacey’s definitely an author you should be checking out and this is an excellent book with which to start.”
• Ryan at Fantasy Book Review said: “Black Feathers is one of the best books I have read this year … I don’t think I’ve read a book quite like Black Feathers, but I know I liked it and I suspect that many of you will like it too.”
• In the same double-header at Fantasy Book Review, Jasper added: “Black Feathers is a unique take on horror and it was for a me a story that did not turn out the way I expected. The narration of the book was great and it felt like the myth surrounding the Crowman is being read to me, being handed down to the next generation.”
• Tabitha at My Shelf Confessions said: “Seldom does it happen that I get so upset by a book that I literally have nightmares after having read it … If you like a gritty apocalyptic that will have you thinking this may be for you but definitely not recommended for the feint of heart, there be no rainbows and fluffy bunnies here kiddos.”
• Lou at More 2 Read said: “This story has epic qualities like that of The Dark Tower series by Stephen King that went on for many volumes. The Black Dawn Saga has plenty more to come in its next instalment”.
• Leanna at Leeanna.me said: “Read it. If, like me, you feel like you’ve read every post-apocalyptic book out there, you haven’t. Black Feathers is something different, with a new take on the end of the world.”

Joseph was also interviewed by Leeanna at Leeanna.me, delving into the background to Black Feathers and the Black Dawn duology, and by Kristin at My Bookish Ways, talking about Black Feathers and his writing career to-date.

The Age Atomic, by Adam Christopher, art & design by Will StaehleAlso out this week we have The Age Atomic, the sequel to Adam Christopher‘s dimension-shattering debut Empire State. It was reviewed by Christian DuChateau for CNN.com, who said: “The Age Atomic defies classification as it incorporates elements across the sci-fi and fantasy spectrum. Christopher has let his imagination run wild, with some fantastic results.” Christian also interviewed Adam in the same article – well worth a look-see. Chris at All Things Urban Fantasy also took a look and said: “You’ve got political intrigue, super heroes and villains, and a cracking good mystery. What’s not to like? My only word of warning though is that this is not a series you can just jump in to. You do need to read the previous volume or you’ll be completely lost. Which is a good thing, because the first book is stellar as well.”

Speaking of Empire State, OzNoir posted a review at Just a Guy That Likes to Read, which concluded: “Empire State is not an easily definable novel in terms of confining it within a single genre as there are simply too many facets and faces to the story Christopher tells … This is a must read for fans of superhero and sci-fi fiction.”

Adam has also been doing a superb job of putting himself about online this week, with a guest post on John Scalzi‘s Whatever on the subject of The Big Idea behind The Age Atomic, another guest post for Mary Robinette Kowall, telling her all about his Favourite Bit from the book, He’s also answered Ten Questions put to him by the mighty Chuck Wendig and was interviewed by Lawrence M. Schoen for his regular Eating Authors column, on the subject of all things foody.

The Lives of Tao by Wesley ChuWe’ve spot another couple of early reviews of Wesley Chu‘s forthcoming (May!) debut The Lives of Tao, from Lisa at Wilder’s Book Reviews who said: “I think The Lives of Tao was very well done and I will definitely keep my eye out for the next one. Between the humor and the originality of the story, I would certainly recommend reading it.” and from Josh at Examiner.com, who said: “The Lives of Tao marvelously casts all of war, science, politics, religion, and economics into a stark new light. It switches well between action-packed scenes and philosophical discussions about human nature and the pitfalls of manipulation, even guided by the best of intents.”

Emma Newman‘s Between Two Thorns was reviewed by
Theresa at Terror Tree who said: “It has been a very long time since I have read a book that has enthralled me to the extent I become miserable at the thought of it ending. Well done Newman. I want more.” Good news, Theresa: the sequel, Any Other Name will be out in June.

Matthew Hughes‘s third To Hell and Back novel, Hell To Pay, was reviewed by Mieneke at A Fantastical Librarian who called it: “a highly enjoyable read, with some interesting philosophical underpinnings and surprising twists. The book makes for a satisfying ending to the To Hell & Back series, which gave us a quirky, off-beat story about an unlikely super hero, with unexpected depths.”

Nexus by Ramez NaamRamez Naam‘s Nexus is still going strong, with new reviews this week from Stephen L. Macknik for the Scientific American Illusion Chasers blog: “This sophisticated page-turning techno-thriller is one of my favorite stories of all time … Naam is remarkable in his ability to address deep philosophical concepts while keeping the story line light, fast, and action-packed.” and from Larry at 42 Webs: “Reading Ramez Naam reminded me of a time when I was younger, in my high school years, when I dove into books that some would say were well beyond my comprehension … I expect much from Naam. He is a talented writer who can produce hope like Crichton but still make us feel weary like Philip K. Dick.” Larry also added Nexus (and the first To Hell and Back book, The Damned Busters) to his Top Ten Books I Recommend The Most list.

Lee Collins‘s weird western debut The Dead of Winter was reviewed at OwlCat Mountain: “I blazed through this book in record time and found much to enjoy. I’m looking forward to the second novel, which promises to be just as engrossing as the first. The Dead of Winter is a great read for these cold nights as we transition into spring.”

Paul S. Kemp‘s first tale of Egil and Nix, The Hammer and the Blade, was reviewed by Mike at Stuff And/Or Junk: “The story moves fast, the dialogue is witty, the combat is oiled slick and the characters are crazy enjoyable. It’s straight up fantasy but it’s not kowtowing to the stodgy traditionalist parts of the genre. The Hammer and the Blade is fresh with life in it, the kind of fantasy novels I want more of.”

Anne Lyle‘s first Night’s Masque book, The Alchemist of Souls was reviewed by Lor for Wilder’s Book Reviews, who had lots of good things to say about the book and only one that wasn’t: “My only complaint about this novel is that it was over too quickly. My first read was in one sitting over about 6 hours. It is addictive, the characters make you care, and the setting is beautiful. What more can you ask for from a novel?”

Zoo City author Lauren Beukes – whose brand new novel The Shining Girls will be published in the UK and South Africa in a month or so and a couple of months later in the US – was interviewed by Sci Fi Now, wherein she explains how to write a science fiction novel (in case you’ve ever wondered…)

And finally, brand new Angry Robot author Freya Robertson has braved Lee Battersby‘s blog as a guest of his Room 102 feature, wherein she gets to remove something from the universe for ever and ever and ever. Which is nice.

That’s your lot for this week. We’re off to the pub for four days. Except for Angry Robot Lee, who’ll be at Eastercon, in the bar, instead. Have a good holiday, everyone!

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Mar
22

Robot Round-Up, 22.03.13

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Hello and welcome to this week’s whizz round all the online Angry Robot Action that’s fit to link to. Without further ado:

Between Two Thorns by Emma Newman, March 2013Emma Newman‘s Between Two Thorns was reviewed by Kathy at Kindle-aholic’s Book Pile, who said: “This is a book that contains MANY THINGS. This can be tricky sometimes … [but] Newman managed to corral the different worlds, characters and machinations to deliver an engaging read that left me wanting more.”

And you can enter a giveaway at The Founding Fields for your chance to win one of two copies of the book, before the closing date of April 1st.

Matthew Hughes‘s third To Hell and Back novel, Hell to Pay, was reviewed by David Brzeski for the British Fantasy Society and he said: “The first book in the series was very good, the second was better. The events of those books were leading up to this final volume in the trilogy and it’s the best yet.”

Lee Collins‘s second Cora Oglesby novel, She Returns From War was also reviewed by Kathy at Kindle-aholic’s Book Pile, who found the change in POV-focus from book one a bit of a wrench, but came to appreciate the twist: “I was reminded a few times of the movie Unforgiven, with the younger generation getting a look at the real life of a legend, and also learning about the costs of living such a life.”

Lee also had a chat with Larry at 42 Webs this week, all about The Dead of Winter, She Returns From War and his favourite genre books and writers.

Black Feathers by Joseph D'Lacey, April 2013Joseph D’Lacey‘s Black Feathers, the first part of the Black Dawn duology, which will be with you next week in US/CAN print and global ebook, received a 4.5/5 star review from Rebecca at Book Chick City, who said: “I really did love this book, as it had everything I was looking for and more, and really redefined the genres of fantasy and dystopian fiction. I know the two genres have been merged before, but this book just had that special un-put-down-able spark I couldn’t resist.”

Joseph has written a guest post for Upcoming4.me on the subject of the story behind Black Feathers. And he’s also endured a grilling from Chuck Wendig to answer Ten Questions About Black Feathers

Wesley Chu‘s The Lives of Tao is out in May and Wesley was the guest of Abhinav Jain’s latest Names: A New Perspective guest post series this week, talking about the importance of appropriately-named villains. You can also read an exclusive excerpt at Tor.com. And if you’re a US-based Goodreads user, you can put your name in the hat to win a signed ARC copy of The Lives of Tao by visiting Goodreads.com and clicking the ‘Enter to Win’ button. Easy as.

Cara Fielder, writing for the Waterstones Blog, has taken a look at the future of SF and declared that a good-sized chunk of it is Adam Christopher shaped. Adam has also been releasing a series of teaser excerpts from The Age Atomic, the soon-to-be-released sequel to Empire State. The latest snippet went live today at Em’s Place.

Wesley Chu, Adam Christopher and Tim Waggoner all participated in the latest SF Signal mind-meld. on the subject of ‘Reboots – The Good, The Bad and The Unnecessary’.

The Mad Scientist's Daughter by Cassandra Rose Clarke - Feb 2013Cassandra Rose Clarke‘s The Mad Scientist’s Daughter was treated to an extremely thorough, in-depth reading by Michael Ann Dobbs for IO9.com, with the following conclusion: “It’s not a story of future heroism. It’s not even, really, a story about robots. It’s a story of live and failure and expectations. It is, perhaps, in its relentless examination of one woman’s life, one of the most realistic science fiction stories ever told.” And Adam-Troy Castro, writing for the (print only) Sci Fi Magazine enjoyed the novel’s characterisation: “Cat is a finely etched character, difficult, distant, and living in denial of her true feelings for years … Cassandra Rose Clarke does a fine job of staying inside her protagonist’s head, and capturing what it’s like to drift through life without the will or the opportunity to make the best decisions.” The book was also on was on the receiving end of a glowing review from Leah at Uncorked Thoughts, who said: “I found this novel absolutely fascinating … It has so many themes and issues running through it and it’s absolutely brilliant. If you’re a science-fiction lover, a robot lover, or even a lover of books which delve into romance, tragedies and the issues of real life then this book is definitely for you!”

Anne Lyle‘s The Alchemist of Souls and Lee Collins‘s The Dead of Winter have been entered into the BookSpotCentral 7th Annual Book Tournament. Voting will commence on March 21st and will involve all sorts of emailing and Facebook liking… check out the link for full details and vote, vote, vote!

Anne has also announced her founder-member status of the 16-strong fantasy writing team at the new author community The Booksworn. Check it out, fantasy fans!

Jo Anderton isn’t the only AR author who’s been nominated for an Aurelis Award or three – Kaaron Warren is also a triple nominee. Congrats Kaaron!

Aaaand that’s everything we’ve spotted in the past seven days or so. We’ve got a double bank holiday coming up in the UK next weekend, so depending on how things go there’ll either be a shorter Round-Up next Thursday or a bumper double-dose the Friday afterwards. See you then!

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Mar
15

Robot Round-Up, 15.03.13

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Hello and welcome to our regular round-up of all the Angry Robot flavoured online activity and coverage that we’ve spotted since the last round-up. Getting things under-way this week, he have:

Between Two Thorns by Emma Newman, March 2013More reviews of the first part of Emma Newman‘s fabulous The Split Worlds urban fantasy series Between Two Thorns:
• Paul Weimer, writing for the mighty SF Signal said it was: “An enchanting novel from Emma Newman, an urban fantasy that has no sign of tattooed women in leather pants. A headstrong scion and an investigator discover dark doings in the outwardly genteel world of Bath’s secret mirror city.”
• Shadowhawk of Founding Fields fame added: “Between Two Thorns is a book that is packed with a ton of things to entice the reader … I can definitely recommend this to readers of urban fantasy if you are looking for something different”.
• Rebecca at Book Chick City said: “This was a well-crafted fantasy novel which makes a great start to a new series … I can’t wait to see what happens next.”
• Tsana at Tsana’s Reads said: “Between Two Thorns is an excellent read and I highly recommend it to fantasy fans looking for something a bit different, particularly in the form of merging modern day settings with fantasy worlds.”

Plus: a write-up of last week’s Forbidden Planet London book launch was posted by Cavan Scott and Emma braved Chuck Wendig‘s online lair to answer Ten Questions About Between Two Thorns.

Black Feathers by Joseph D'Lacey, April 2013The first part of Joseph D’Lacey‘s post-eco-apocalyptic Black Dawn duology, Black Feathers, is almost upon us (late March / early April, folks!) and the always-Epic Dave-Brendon de Burgh had this to say about it: “As can be expected from Joseph’s work, there are moments of horror, moments of wide-eyed disbelief, moments of laughter and tears and silence pregnant with either peace or rage. He managed to handle everything beautifully and with respect, making both his characters and the world they inhabit come alive.” And Theresa at Terror Tree said: “The images of a bleak and savage world are genuinely horrific … Gripping stuff and I look forward to the conclusion of this tale.” Theresa has also posted an interview with Joseph about his writing and plans for future work, at the same link.

Likewise, it’s not long now until we unleash Adam Christopher‘s The Age Atomic, sequel to his terrific debut Empire State. Over at Daily Steampunk, Traveler had the following high praise to hand out: “The Age Atomic is another masterful tale by Adam Christopher. An action-packed noir Atompunk tale with more layers, facettes and twists than one would expect and which keeps the reader enthralled from the first to the last page. Highly recommended reading!” And Brandon at Every Read Thing had this to say: “While the ideas behind this series show that Adam is imaginative and bright, it’s the writing that keeps you enthralled. I couldn’t tell you the amount of evenings where I lost track of time reading this book – it’s that good.”

Brandon has posted his interview with Adam Christopher as well; plenty there on Adam’s background as a writer, Empire State and The Age Atomic.

The Lives of Tao by Wesley ChuWesley Chu‘s action-packed debut The Lives of Tao is a little further away (late April / early May) but we’re already starting to see a review or two surfacing here and there, including one at Being a Big Sandwich, in which blogger Scott declares: “I would highly recommend this book to fans who like their espionage tinged with sci-fi, or vice-versa.”

Eric Brown, in his latest science fiction column for The Guardian has this to say about Cassandra Rose Clarke‘s The Mad Scientist’s Daughter: “the twist is that the cool, rational Finn is a robot, and Cat’s love for him is unrequited because she ages while he does not, and he is not programmed to respond to her emotions. It’s a neat premise and Clark examines the ramifications with the precision of a poet”.

Peter at My Bookish Ways said of Ramez Naam‘s freshly movie-optioned Nexus: “reads like a high energy thriller and you’ll find his reluctant hero, Kade, worth rooting for … Nexus is a strong, and exciting, debut from an author to watch!”

The first of Lee Collins‘s Cora Oglesby novels, She Returns From War was reviewed by Shadowhawk at The Founding Fields and Shadowhawk said: “She Returns From War is a most excellent novel, and lives up to the promise of The Dead of Winter.” Word.

Madeline Ashby‘s vN was reviewed by Steve Jones for Terror Tree, who said: “vN is a thrilling adventure story with a well-developed cast of both humans and vNs, which challenges the meaning of being a person without ever being preachy about it.”

Josh at In Order of Importance took a look at Chris F. Holm‘s first Collector novel, Dead Harvest and called it a “classic mix of deduction, ultra-violence, narrow escapes, shocking revelations, and sudden turns of fortune that make noir such a satisfying genre. Also, possessions, demons, seraphs, and lucky cat statues. Just fantastic enough to be entertaining, but not so unrealistic that it stretches the bounds of credulity.”

And finally: the closing date for applications to be the Angry Robot Fiction Publicity Manager isn’t until March 25th, so you still have plenty of time to polish your c.v. and hone your covering letter. Go on, you know you want to. We promise the implant procedures won’t hurt too much…

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Mar
08

Robot Round-Up, 08.03.13

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Hello and welcome to this week’s Robot Round-Up, our regular look at all the last week or so’s Angry Robot action that’s fit to link to. Starting with…

Between Two Thorns by Emma Newman, March 2013More reviews for Emma Newman‘s first Split Worlds novel Between Two Thorns, which was reviewed this week by:

• Pablo Cheesecake at The Eloquent Page, who said: “Treading similar thematic ground to the likes of Clive Barker’s Weaveworld and Neil Gaiman’s Neverwhere, Emma Newman’s first Split Worlds novel still manages to be a wonderfully iconoclastic affair. I feel like I’ve only been given a tantalising glimpse through a fantastical doorway.”
• Sarah at And Then I Read a Book summed things up rather neatly: “Missing people, kidnap, three wishes, charms, deception and Grand Tours collide in a story that’s part fairytale, part fantasy, part Jane Austen, with a sprinkling of bonkers brilliance.”
Steven M. Long enjoyed the world-building: “What I want from an alternate, magical reality is a mix of the expected and the surprising, and Between Two Thorns does a good job of delivering that, primarily through the use of some off-beat points of view and the addition of some unique flourishes.”

Meanwhile, Emma has been interviewed over at My Bookish Ways – and don’t miss the feature interview in the latest issue of SFX Magazine – as well as talking to Abhinav Jain about how she picked great names for the great families in The Split Worlds. Plus, the fifty-second and final instalment of Emma’s truly epic Split Worlds short story writing project has gone live on Paul Cornell‘s blog. Read! Read them all!

The Marching Dead by Lee Battersby, April 2013The first review we’ve seen of Lee Battersby‘s The Marching Dead is a cracker from Bob at Beauty in Ruins, who said: “Battersby absolutely nails the narrative style, balancing humour and horror, fantasy and felony. It’s another quick-moving, well-written story that amuses, excites, and concludes with some rather deep, and remarkably heavy musings on the subjects of life, death, and the afterlife – or the lack thereof.”

Joseph D’Lacey‘s soon-to-be-unleashed Black Feathers has received another red-hot review, this time from Bane of Kings at The Founding Fields, who declared it to be: “A brilliant take on the post apocalyptic genre. Creepy, unnerving and page-turning, D’Lacey creates a compelling story with some fasnicating characters.”

There’s an interview with Joseph at Thirteen O’Clock with some searching questions from Alan Baxter on the subject of Black Feathers, writing and horror in general. And Joseph has been talking to Abhinav Jain about the character of names.

Tor.com have posted an exclusive excerpt from Adam Christopher‘s forthcoming Empire State sequel, The Age Atomic.

Ramez Naam‘s Nexus was reviewed by Barbara for the Portland Book Review and she called it “A Riveting Sci-Fi Thriller”, adding: “This is a fantastic novel that sci-fi fans must read.”

Lee Collins‘s The Dead of Winter was reviewed by firebreathingmonsters: “Collins really nails the balance between western and horror in the novel, with the plot moving at a slow boil punctuated by periods of intense action”.

Richard at Elf Machines From Hyperspace said Anne Lyle‘s first Night’s Masque instalment, The Alchemist of Souls is “a gem of a first novel” and went on to explain why: “I felt as if I walked those smelly Tudor streets as strongly as I’ve felt it reading writers like Mantel or Peter Ackroyd … Anne Lyle has given us the Elizabethan London we know from reading history and Shakespeare; but she’’s also created a London that has just enough strangeness in its shadows to keep us anticipating wonder.”

And finally… scared yet? No? Give it time…

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