Archive for Interesting Stuff

Yeah, it’s Friday afternoon in the Angry Robot office (YMMV), so it was inevitable that we were going to goof about for an hour or two, and run some of our recent and upcoming book covers through Deep Dream.

Do you know it – Google’s new software algorithm that attempts to mimic what happens in the human subconscious during dream states? It’s a bit limited at the moment: it really only draws on images of dogs and eyeballs right now – but it’s still damn freaky and we had a blast revealing the Cthulhu-esque subliminals lurking just behind our cover art.

Here are some of our favourites. If you’re eating something a bit icky, or have recently ingested a heavy dose of hallucinogenic pharmaceuticals, you may care to skip this post. If you’re up for it, you can click on each to see a much larger version. What’s your favourite?

If Then (Deep Dream Dawnbreaker (deep dream) Empire Ascendant (deep dream)

Butterfly Girl (deep dream) The Ark (deep dream) The Buried Life (deep dream)

The Dragon Engine (deep dream) Unseemly Science (deep dream) Windswept (deep dream)

Want to have a go yourself? Check out the Dream Scope online app. Don’t have nightmares.

Apr
01

Look what we found in the AR archive

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In spring, like so many people, one’s thoughts turn to tidying up a bit, i.e. spring cleaning. Our bristling orbital death platform has been looking a bit dusty and ramshackle of late – books and body parts everywhere, of course, but also crates of a less identifiable nature.

Right at the bottom of the most distant stack, in a wooden chest marked in a font of a distinctly pre-millenial variety (how you get Comic Sans on the side of an oak case I’ve no idea), we made a delighted discovery. In short, we found mint copies of some of Angry Robot’s releases from the very earliest days of the imprint. Very collectible, and we know we aren’t the only readers who have hung onto these original editions, even though copies are very scarce out there. It’s fascinating to see how our cover design styles have changed over the decades [ click to enlarge ]:

TheLivesOfTao66 Nexus74 SevenForges76

From the left: one of our short-lived but very collectable series of AR Doubles, from 1966 (Guy Haley’s Reality 36 on the other side, as we’re sure you remember); the first appearance of that sleeper hit Nexus, from 1974; and an example of the first Jim Moore complete repackaging programme, from 1976.

Heartwood1979 Vn1985 Three1985

From left: powerful swords & sorcery imagery that screams 1979, also the inspiration behind Hawkwind’s concept album, released the following year; and a chance to compare and contrast UK and US packaging approaches, both from 1985.

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Feb
26

Authors Anonymous

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Looks like an interesting Indie film (released in March). Do you recognise any of the characters…?

 

Feb
26

Read our Reddit

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Last night (10pm-midnight GMT, 5pm-7pm EST) Angry Robot’s North American Sales & Marketing Manager, Mike Underwood, joined forces with Senior Editor Lee Harris to answer questions at r/Fantasy over at Reddit about Angry Robot, publishing in general, and socks*. There were lots of excellent questions, and very few rubbish ones.

Head on over to reddit.com/r/fantasy to read some of the responses…

 

*That one’s a lie.

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PRESS RELEASE: 30 JANUARY 2014: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Angry Robot Books brings ebook bundling program to the USA

KEY NOTE: In 2012, Angry Robot Books began partnering with Indie bookshops in the UK to offer free ebook bundling via the Clonefiles initiative. Angry Robot has been giving DRM-free ebook editions free as companions to all physical books sold at participating Clonefiles stores. Now, Clonefiles is coming to North America.

AR ClonefilesDETAILS: With BitLit as a fulfillment partner, Angry Robot has teamed up with leading independent bookstores McLean and Eakin Books and Prairie Lights Books to offer free ebook editions with all physical copies of Angry Robot Books sold at these two stores.

Angry Robot have always been champions of DRM-free eBook publishing and are been eager to experiment with new business and distribution models. A dual-format offering for Indies is a natural extension of Angry Robot’s customer-first ethos and a great way for Angry Robot to show some love for the USA’s fantastic Indie bookshop scene.

 

Upon purchase of physical book, customers will receive information on how to download the free BitLit app and use it to claim their free ebook edition of Angry Robot Books.

CALLING BOOKSTORES: Angry Robot is looking to expand the program to other independent bookstores across the USA and Canada. Interested bookstores should contact Mike Underwood at mike.underwood@angryrobotbooks.com for more information.

 Prairie Lights Books

http://prairielights.com

 McLean and Eakin Booksellers

http://www.mcleanandeakin.com/

 BitLit

www.bitlit.com

Jan
02

Open Door – some interesting stats

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I’ve had a quick look at the submissions for our recent Open Door period, and thought I’d share some stats with you. I was primarily interested in the breakdown of genre and gender.

Note: For gender, I merely used the first name given, so a binary (m/f) breakdown is all that is possible – I am unable to state that these figures are correct with regard to how the authors self-identify.

Out of 524 submissions received, these were the results:

Science Fiction Urban Fantasy General Fantasy
WTF**

Total
Male 135 53 78 71 337
Female 45 28 53 27 153
Unknown* 9 3 12 10 34
Total 189 84 143 108

*Either initials were used instead of a first name, the first name is often used by men and women, or the first name was unfamiliar to me.
** Defined in the submissions guidelines as anything other than science fiction, fantasy and urban fantasy

Observations:

The most popular genre for male authors was science fiction (40.1%).
The most popular genre for female authors was general fantasy (34.6%).
Fantasy as a whole (general + urban) was responsible for 52.9% of submissions by women, but only 38.9% of submissions by men.

The “wtf” category* attracted 21.1% of male authors’ submissions and 17.6% of female authors’ submissions.

Across all genders, science fiction accounted for 36.1% of submissions, urban fantasy 16%, general fantasy 27.3% (so 43.3% for fantasy) and wtf 20.6%.

Interestingly, out of a 2 month submission window, nearly a quarter of all submissions were sent during the last week, with 14% sent in the last 2 days. 3 were sent on Christmas Day.

This is, of course, a small sampling of data, and it would be foolish to try to extrapolate much from it. It doesn’t tell us that more men are writing science fiction than women, it just tells us that during this short window, more men submitted their novels to one publisher, than women. It tells us nothing of the quality of the prose, nor the number of books written by the authors who submitted. It will be interesting to get more data once the books have been read by the editors.

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Hey guys, today I’m here to share a wonderful project undertaken by Upcoming4.me. They have put together an ebook of Story Insides including some of Angry Robot authors, with proceeds for the Epilepsy Action Charity. This book is a fascinating collection which features forty non-fiction essays on writing and editing speculative fiction by published authors! It contains essays from our own wonderful authors:  Lee Batterby, Freya Robertson, Mike Shevdon and Jo Anderton. This is such a wonderful idea and here is a little information about the book:

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Story Behind the Book: Volume 1
“Story Behind the Book : Volume 1″ collects nearly 40 non-fiction essays on writing and editing speculative fiction written by some of creative burst, worldbuilding, tackling writer’s block, to the final process of publication. Some of the essays are personal, some rather technical but all of them, without an exception, provide an unique and fascinating insight into the mind of an author.the most exciting authors and editors. Essays cover everything from getting an initial

Contributors include Ian Whates, Michael Logan, Mathieu Blais and Joel Casseus, Mark T. Barnes, Lisa Jensen, Lee Battersby, L. E. Modesitt Jr., Keith Brooke, Joanne Anderton, Jo Walton, F.R. Tallis, Ian R. MacLeod, Guy Haley, Gavin Smith, Francis Knight, Eric Brown, Clifford Beal, Susan Palwick, Rhiannon Held, Ben Jeapes, Nina Allan, Mike Shevdon, Mur Lafferty, Norman Lock, Seth Patrick, Gemma Malley, Freda Warrington, Freya Robertson and more.

Follow the links to purchase your copy – remember all proceeds go to charity!

Amazon UK || Amazon U.S. 

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Oct
01

Diverse Worlds Grant Fundraiser

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Two of the publicists at Little, Brown are running a marathon to fund a new grant that will support diversity in science fiction and fantasy literature.

Ellen B Wright and Faye Bi are aiming to raise $5,000 between them, but come on – I think we can help them do much better than that, don’t you? Their total currently stands (at the time of writing this blog) at $1,380.

You can find the full details (and donate) here, but in their own words:

We’ve created this marathon fundraiser on Crowdrise to support the Speculative Literature Foundation, a non-profit organization that promotes science fiction and fantasy and encourages new writers of both adult and children’s genre literature. They’ve agreed to use the funds we raise to create a new grant called the Diverse Worlds grant, which will help writers from backgrounds traditionally underrepresented in the genre to start and continue publishing. As good science fiction and fantasy worlds should, this grant will welcome all kinds of diversity: gender, race/ethnicity, sexual orientation, class, ability level, religion, etc.

Let’s show everyone what we already know – that SF and F fans are the most supportive fans in the world!

Sep
03

Introducing : Clonefiles USA

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This past weekend at The World Science Fiction Convention in San Antonio, Texas, we announced the launch of Clonefiles in the USA.

Clonefiles is a programme where you buy the paperback from a participating independent bookstore, and get the ebook absolutely free!

This was trialled in the UK last year, and the success of the pilot has encouraged us to do the same in the USA.

It’s also gratifying to see that the giants still follow where Angry Robot innovates… 😀

More details of the US Clonefiles initiative to follow, very soon…

Hi folks,

The Open Door process was brought in by Angry Robot a few years ago, and whilst we know – and celebrate – our authors that made it through, we realised that you, the lovely reader or busily-searching-for-publishing-deal author, mightn’t be aware which of our wonderful authors came through the process.  So, we’re taking a moment to mark those authors who made it through, and hear their thoughts on it. Strange Chemistry are currently running an Open Door at the minute, so do head over if YA SF/F/WTF is right up your alley! But for now, over to Amanda, and the authors.

C

*** 

As some of you are no doubt aware, at Strange Chemistry we’re very keen to find new writing talent, and, as such, we have opened to unagented submissions for the second year running. The Open Door is something that Angry Robot began a couple of years back and they enjoyed enormous success, signing some immensely talented authors. We caught up with a few of them to ask them what the Open Door has meant for them and how their lives have changed.

Freya Robertson

Freya-Robertson-300x300Hi! I’m Freya Robertson and my first book with Angry Robot—an epic fantasy called Heartwood—comes out on October 29th this year.

My story starts in 2011. I’d finished Heartwood and touted it around a few agents, but had little interest. Then in April 2012 I saw that Angry Robot had an Open Door submission policy for two weeks. Bloggers were full of praise for the publisher, so I decided to take the plunge.

I read the first 10,000 words, polished, and worked hard on the two-sentence summary and synopsis. Then I emailed it off, put it to the back of my mind and carried on writing other things.

In September Amanda sent an email saying she’d enjoyed what she’d read and would like to read more. This is about when my head exploded. I had a request for a full! I read through the whole manuscript in two days, polishing and tweaking, and sent it off.

In October Amanda returned to say she had enjoyed the full and passed it onto Lee Harris. She said “You’ve basically reached the final stage – he’ll either reject or make an offer.”

Any writer will tell you that the hardest part of the submission process (apart from actually pressing Send!) is the waiting. I managed to make it until February before I queried. Lee came back to me to say he liked it and was taking the book to his colleagues, and could I send any plans I had for a follow-up novel please. After picking myself off the floor, I wrote up my ideas for a sequel and emailed it off. A week later Lee emailed back to offer me a two book contract with an option on a third.

Apart from my wedding day and the birth of my son, that was the happiest day of my life. A good friend announced it in the staff meeting of the school where I work, and all day people came in to congratulate me. That night we had a party and it’s possible I may have drunk too much :-)

I’d already had twenty digital romances published. But fantasy and sci-fi are my first love, and I put my heart and soul into Heartwood. To think it is going to be on the shelves soon as a real book is a dream come true.

I thank AR for the opportunity to submit without an agent from the bottom of my heart. The process now of seeing my cover, the map I drew by hand translated by a proper cartographer, and my story tightened and made better by Lee’s careful touch is just wonderful.

AR continues to go from strength to strength gaining spectacular reviews and praise, and I’m thrilled to be a part of the team. So if you’re wondering whether to push that Send button, I urge you to go for it! And may the luck of the ‘Verse be with you :-)

Cassandra Rose Clarke

I hate writing queries. Hate them, hate them, hate them. Moreover, I’m apparently bad at them, as evidenced byCassandra-R-Clarke-400x560 the fact that I sent out almost a hundred of the things and only had two or three agents look at my work. The AR Open Door was a miracle to me.

The Mad Scientist’s Daughter was the second book I wrote and the first that I queried, which got me nowhere. I was about to give up on the whole writing professionally thing (yes, really) when I decided to submit The Mad Scientist’s Daughter to the first Open Door Month. I expected my submission to be rejected as my queries had, and every time it moved up the chain was a pleasant surprise.

I’ve written about and GIF-ified my experience on the day that I learned the novel had been accepted, so I won’t repeat that here. But I will say this: I received that initial Yes, we’ll take it! email in October 2011. In the not-quite-two years since, I’ve published three novels. Two more are on the way. And one of my novels, the first one, was nominated for YALSA’s 2014 Best Fiction for Young Adults list.

Not bad for someone who was ready to throw it all to the wayside and expend her creative energy on Harry Potter fanfiction, huh?

I’m still not convinced I’d have an agent, much less a publishing contract, if it weren’t for the Open Door Month. That one little decision to submit, made with the expectation of failure, completely opened up my writing career. Now, the process hasn’t been all sunshine and rainbows and starred Kirkus reviews—the increased anxiety in particular hasn’t been what I’d call fun—but at the same time, I’m fulfilling a dream I’ve had since elementary school, when I took a future career test on my school’s computer and got “novelist” as my top result (again, really). I know there aren’t a lot of people out there who get to say that, and I’m incredibly grateful for the team at Angry Robot and Strange Chemistry for giving me that opportunity.

Laura Lam

lauralam1

When I submitted to Angry Robot’s Open Door Month on March 30, 2011, I had no idea how much my life would change. I’d been writing for several years, but I knew nothing about the publishing industry. I was woefully ignorant, but learned from my mistakes (eventually). After subbing a manuscript that needed more editing than I knew how to give it at the time, I settled down for the wait. A few months later, I flew to the East Coast to meet my extended family and had a request for a full manuscript, which made me realise—hey, maybe I don’t suck at this writing thing. After the full manuscript was called in, I started learning more about the publishing industry, making friends via the forum Absolute Write. Then I found out I was going to the editors of AR. It was another AR author, Anne Lyle, who gave me the confidence to go to my first convention, and I angsted with the other people who had their full manuscripts called in (we dubbed ourselves the Anxious Appliances, though now we call ourselves the Inkbots). It was there I became friends with AR author Wesley Chu, who’s now one of my closest friends.

When I sent off that manuscript, I’d daydreamed about getting through the various rounds and getting a book deal, and sometimes I’m still amazed it happened. It wasn’t a bumpless road—that manuscript needed more work and so I had a revision request. They also thought it was more YA, and luckily they were deciding to go that way anyway, and my reader Amanda was promoted to the editor of Strange Chemistry. It was almost a year before I had my final decision about Pantomime, but that gave me time to grow. I learned so much more about writing by gutting Pantomime, re-arranging it, and making it shine. Now I’ve written a sequel, and I’m writing other books, and Pantomime is on the shelf, a real physical book. And that’s awesome.

Wesley Chu

Wesley-ChuOh great Angry Robot Open Submission of 2011, you were a sneaky punk-ass bastard. I shall fondly remember you for the sources of my upset stomachs, mild cases of syphilitic crazed episodes (without the syphilis of course—I swear), and extended struggles with insomnia, but you were so fucking worth it you little sweet, sweet pain in the life-changing ass you.

I know what’s going through your head. If you think syphilis and insomnia sound like a crappy time, you’d be right. I mean, not that I know or anything about syphilis being unpleasant. I’m only assuming it ranks down there somewhere between getting tickled and getting kicked in the gut. Wait, what am I talking about again? Oh yes, back to the great Angry Robot Open Submission of 2011.

Hi, I’m Wesley Chu and I like to write, and through the gentle grace and heavily anodized fist of the mighty robot overlords, I’m the published author of The Lives of Tao and the upcoming The Deaths of Tao (October 29th).
How has the open sub changed my life? There’s something about that first time you make the bookstore pilgrimage to see your little newborn baby sitting on the shelf in its punch-you-in-the-face yellow glory right next to Arthur C. Clarke (because Ch is next to Cl) that you realize that “shit just got real.”

To be honest, I can barely remember what my life was like before the open submission. I was just a squatter who spent countless hours abusing the bottomless cup of coffee policies at cafes chasing a dream. Now…wait, that hasn’t change. What has changed is that now I have a career doing what I love. Someone actually pays me to write! I mean, how ridiculous is that?

So what’s the open door process like? Not gonna lie; it’s going to be long. You’re going to be excited. You’re going to have to wait. You’re going to lose sleep, then you’re going to wait some more. And then maybe, like I did, you’ll seek out others who have also submitted to the open sub as well. You’ll commiserate with them and maybe form an online social group. Maybe they become your writing besties as you all eagerly hit F5 on your inbox every few seconds. Some of you will get rejected, some will be fortunate enough to move on to the next level. The numbers of rejections will eventually begin to pile up and people you grow to care about will drop out one by one.

In the end though, after you’re exhausted from the wait and the many nights of insomnia, when you’re least expecting it, you might get an email from the awesome Ms. Amanda Rutter, telling you how much she enjoys your book and how she wants to share it with the rest of the world.

Then you might suddenly need to sit down as you think to yourself “shit just got real.”

There you go! So, exactly why are you waiting on submitting? You could be the next great novelist on our list!

To celebrate today’s launch of Any Other Name, the second in the Split Worlds series, Emma Newman gives us an insight into what life as a narrator is like, but specifically what it’s like for an author to narrate his or her own characters. With praise for Between Two Thorns recently coming from The Guardian describing Emma as “J. K. Rowling meets Georgette Heyer”, we’re even more excited than normal for this fantastic release. 

Not only that, but Emma is running a competition to win the audio book of Any Other Name, details here:http://www.enewman.co.uk/publishing/any-other-name-is-out-in-the-uk

Happy book birthday, Emma!

The Author - Emma Newman

Audio books, authors and readers – oh my!

I’ve been narrating audio books for a few years now and it’s something I enjoy immensely. Narrating a book is like climbing inside it; I feel I’ve really understood and explored a novel I’ve narrated on a much deeper level than one I’ve just enjoyed as a reader.

As a narrator, I feel just as responsible for a listener’s enjoyment of an audio book as the author – which is an odd thing to feel, especially as I’m an author too. If my performance is poor it could be a barrier to someone consuming the story so I do my best to deliver the narrative at the correct pace and in such a way as to stay interesting (i.e. no monotonous drone!) as well as delivering information in the correct way. Sentences can have their meanings altered just by a change in inflection and it’s my role to ensure my own interpretation isn’t contrary to what the author intends – something I, of course, have to guess from what I read.

Audio books don’t just change the medium of story delivery

When a person listens to an audiobook, they’re letting a third person into the relationship: writer, narrator and listener, rather than just writer and reader.

If you think about when you read a book, the character’s voices as well as the narration emerge from your consumption of the text. When a narrator gets involved everything changes; you hear what has emerged from the text for them first. I interpret how I think the characters would speak and deliver their words accordingly, thus having an influence on how a listener may feel about that character. Of course, that isn’t nearly as powerful as watching a film or TV adaptation that’s been through many, many people before reaching the screen, but it’s a factor nonetheless.

The hope is that the narrator enriches the experience, or at the very least, doesn’t get in the way!

Then I signed the Split Worlds deal with Angry Robot

After I’d calmed down a little (and asked Lee if he really had said what I thought he did) one of the first things I asked about was the audio book version. Specifically; would I be able to do it?

Brilliance Audio produces Angry Robot’s audio books and there was no guarantee they’d want me to narrate – they have lots of professional narrators to pick from. However, much to my delight, they listened to samples of my audio work online and offered the narration to me.

It’s different when it’s your own

I’ve narrated a collection of my own short stories before, for Iambik Audio, so it wasn’t the first time I’d narrated my own work, but working on the Split Worlds audio books was a whole new experience. For one thing I was in a studio working with a sound engineer and director. Such a joy! No more hours of editing and re-recording errors in my home office! However, I went from recording in half hour bursts to 5-6 hour stretches a day over a week or so and that demanded some stamina.

The other difference is that in a studio you wear headphones that play your own voice to you as you read. That is weird. You quickly get used to it, but your attention and concentration is split between producing verbal output and analysing aural input at the same time. With each line you’re focused on the best delivery and a beat later thinking “did that sound right?” so you get very tired by the end of the day. I do still love it though. There’s a joy in intense and deep concentration (can you tell I’m an introvert?) that the work provides in spades.

The thing about being the narrator and the author of the work is that the internal editor gets louder. I have many author friends who tell me they sometimes edit on the fly when performing readings at events – well, the urge to do that has to be squashed in the recording studio as your reading has to be text perfect. No matter how many times you edit your book, you’ll always find something to worry about when you next read it – and all the doubts and fears about how it will be received increase tenfold when you’re recording it! However, the good thing is that it catches those tiny typos that might have missed the proof reader’s eye if the book hasn’t gone to press yet.

The best thing about narrating the Split Worlds novels

When I wrote Between Two Thorns and Any Other Name (the first two novels in the series and the ones I’ve recorded to date), I spent a lot of time with those characters in my head. They’re still there actually, I’ve no idea when they’ll decide to leave. Anyway, I know what they sound like. As a narrator I don’t have to make as best a guess as I can – all I have to do is do my best to convey what is already in my head. The intonation, the inflection, the pause as a character struggles to say the right thing is all there already.

Being the author and the narrator means that relationship goes back from three to two people. It’s just me and you, surviving in the Split Worlds, and I like that. I hope you do too.

Between Two Thorns by Emma Newman, March 2013Any Other Name by Emma Newman, Artwork by Sarah J. Coleman

Jan
31

Ramez Naam’s Authors@Google Video

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Ramez Naam was invited to Google HQ recently as part of their Google Talks / Authors@Google programme. He talked to a group of Google People about many of the ideas behind Nexus, the history of brain-machine interface technology, and asked the question: “would you add Google to your brain?”

If you’re at all interested in trans-humanism, post-humanism, medical technology, neuro-enhancement or just the age-old question of where a science fiction author gets their ideas, you should definitely watch this one:

Rather fascinating stuff. Feel free to share your thoughts via the comments.

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Jan
30

Nekropolis – a fan trailer

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On our bi-weekly stalk of our authors’ Facebook pages, blogs and Twitter streams, we came across this little gem – a fan-made trailer for Tim Waggoner‘s brilliant urban fantasy Nekropolis. A lot of thought and care went into making this, and we’re duly impressed. It’s quite short, so click on PLAY and have a look.

And for those of you aching for more words from that nice Mr Waggoner, well, we just might have some news for you, soon…

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{ Click for a larger version. }

Cassandra Rose Clarke is already setting the imaginations of YA bloggers and reviewers aflame as her Strange Chemistry debut, The Assassin’s Curse starts shipping out to stores for its October launch. Here at Angry Robot we’re readying the second stage of her plans for world domination with a heartbreakingly wonderful novel of love, loss and robots, The Mad Scientist’s Daughter.

Set in a collapsing future America, the novel tells of Cat. When she is a young girl, her father brings an experimental android to their isolated home to serve as her tutor. Finn stays with her, becoming her constant companion and friend as she grows to adulthood. But then they take the relationship much further than anyone intended – which ultimately threatens to force them apart forever.

This unnerving but deeply sensitive mix of science fiction speculation and heartfelt emotion demanded a very different cover approach for us. As you can see, designer Stewart Larking came up with the goods in a lovely understated, almost melancholy style. The Mad Scientist’s Daughter will be published by Angry Robot in February 2013. We cannot wait for you to read it.

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Seven Wonders by Adam ChristopherAdam Christopher’s superior superhero adventure Seven Wonders is published later this month (August 28th in the US, September 6th in the UK – the eBook is published worldwide on August 28th). We asked him to tell us about his favourite 4-colour heroes…

See, here’s the thing: I love superheroes. I love the cheese, I love the colours, I love the spandex. I also love the heroism, the optimism, and the ideals. Since the late 1930s, superhero comics have given us some of the most imaginative and wonderful stories in every genre that exists – and I should say that “superhero” to me is a story type, much like horror or steampunk, not a genre in itself, which allows any kind of story to be told within a specific framework – stories like Seven Wonders, my superhero novel.

So here are my five favourite superheroes from the world of comics – five fictional characters that I love possibly more than any other, whether it be in comics or novels or films or TV. People might know I’m a DC fan, and in compiling this top five, they’ve all ended up coming from that publisher – but if I had gone beyond five, then rest assured some Marvel heroes would have made it, including Iron Man and Daredevil. For the purposes of this list, I’m considering these DC characters in their pre-New 52 iterations, simply because they are the characters I fell in love with.  Read More→

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