Archive for General skiffy bollocks

Sep
18

Robot Tunes

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Our Robotic Overlord Marc Gascoigne is quite the music fan. But he’s not the only one of our cyber-chipped legion who bops his head to tunes while plotting global domination. Caroline and I both love a good showtune (in fact, I’ve been known to blast a Broadway channel on Spotify when no one else is around in the Angry Robot Orbital HQ).

So for today, I wanted to point out some wonderful science-fictional music for folks to enjoy. Maybe you like some techno while you re-read your copy of Prometheus-Award-winning Nexus, or you’d like some epic orchestral music while visiting Raisa in The Mirror Empire. Here are some tunes to accompany your SF, F, and WTF? life:

 

Janelle Monae:

 

Two Steps From Hell:

 

Bastion:

 

Jonathan Coulton:

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Jul
29

Robot Squadron Leaders Never Give Up

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It’s been very busy at Angry Robot HQ lately, and not just because of the fantastic titles we’ve been publishing! I know some of you have noticed I’ve been quieter, and out of the office a few days, but I’m back…and just about in one piece.

10441372_10152241483255642_8836419488324112199_nI play Gaelic Football for Roger Casements GAA Club and just last week we had a very exciting game…the Warwickshire Championship Final. This is one of three competitions we play in throughout the year and, as the county final, it was a big day for the players and the club. These big games require everyone to put their all in, and as I’m captain of the team I expect myself to give even more. However, breaking my foot 10 minutes into a 60 minute game – and continuing to play for the rest of the game – is maybe a bit more than I would usually expect. In my defence, I did think I’d ‘only’ broken my toe or something smaller than my fifth metatarsal!

As our Robot Leader, Marc, declared, we’re tough cookies here at Angry Robot Books!

Unfortunately this fancy shoe I’m wearing does mean I can’t drive and thus won’t be in the office until it’s off, so it’s best to reach me via email for the time being. If you need to have a chat, email me for my mobile number.

Let this be a lesson: don’t mess with the Robot Team…we don’t ever give up!

For anyone interested, here’s a YouTube video* that’ll give you the gist of the national sport of Ireland!

*This video displays the general rules of playing Gaelic Football but not all apply to Ladies Football e.g. we can carry for 5 steps – not 4, and we’re not allowed shoulder-to-shoulder tackles.
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Jul
14

Nexus Wins the Prometheus Award!

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We are delighted to announce that Ramez Naam‘s Nexus has won the 2014 Prometheus Award from the Libertarian Futurist Society, tying with Cory Doctorow‘s brilliant Homeland!

Ramez was short-listed for both Nexus and its sequel Crux with Nexus described thusly in the awards announcement:

Nexus offers a gripping exploration of politics and new extremes of both freedom and tyranny in a near future where emerging technology opens up unprecedented possibilities for mind control or personal liberation and interpersonal connection.

Ramez Naam: “I’m absolutely honored and thrilled to be receiving the Prometheus Award for Best Novel, and even moreso to be sharing it with Cory Doctorow, a writer who exemplifies what it means to use the written word to fight to expand human freedoms. I wrote Nexus and Crux to explore the potential of neuroscience to link together and improve upon human minds. But I also wrote them to explore the roles of censorship, surveillance, prohibition, and extra-legal state use of force in a future not far from our own. Science and technology can be used to lift people up or to trod them underfoot. Making those abstract future possibilities real in the present is a core goal in my novels. I’m glad the selection committee saw that, and I’m very grateful to them for this award!”

Lee Harris:With his three Nexus books (NexusCrux, and the forthcoming Apex), Ramez Naam has proved to be not only a master storyteller, but also a free thinker, whose writing encourages us – his readers – to think more critically about the world around us. I can’t think of a more fitting award for one of the finest new writers of our generation.”

Ramez will be at Worldcon in London next month to happily receive his award, and if you’d like to see him before this, come along to our Angry Robot Summer Invasion of Forbidden Planet on Wednesday 13 August!

Join us in congratulating Ramez on Twitter!

Nexus by Ramez Naam

Nexus

About the awards

The Prometheus Award, sponsored by the Libertarian Futurist Society (LFS), was established in 1979, making it one of the most enduring awards after the Nebula and Hugo awards, and one of the oldest fan-based awards currently in sf. Presented annually since 1982 at the World Science Fiction Convention, the Prometheus Awards include a gold coin and plaque for the winners.

For more than three decades, the Prometheus Awards have recognized outstanding works of science fiction and fantasy that stress the importance of liberty as the foundation for civilization, peace, prosperity, progress and justice.

For a full list of past Prometheus Award winners in all categories, visit www.lfs.org. Membership in the Libertarian Futurist Society is open to any science fiction fan interested in how fiction can promote an appreciation of the value of liberty.

More information is available at http://lfs.org.

Jun
30

Angry Robot 5: Lee’s Top 5

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Tuesday 1 July marks 5 years from Angry Robot’s first books – Lauren Beukes‘ Moxyland and Kaaron Warren‘s Slights – and we are celebrating this anniversary, over the next 5 days, with daily staff blog posts and giveaways! Author guest posts and other cool giveaways will be popping up on various sites so keep an eye out for our #AngryRobot5 on Twitter for new posts.

First up is our Senior Editor, Lee Harris, with his Top 5 Reasons Angry Robot Rules, and his choice of giveaway is The Knights of Breton Court (omnibus edition x 5) by Maurice Broaddus. Details of this giveaway, and why Lee chose The Knights of Breton Court are at the end of this post.

Top 5 Reasons Angry Robot Rules

5. A Home for New Talent

In the 5 years since Angry Robot first started publishing, we’ve published the debut novels of TWENTY-ONE authors:

Lauren Beukes – Moxyland
Kaaron Warren – Slights
Mike Shevdon – Sixty-One Nails
Aliette de Bodard – Servant of the Underworld
Lavie Tidhar – The Bookman
Ian Whates – City of Dreams and Nightmare
Maurice Broaddus – King Maker
Guy Haley – Reality 36
Jo Anderton – Debris
Adam Christopher – Empire State
David Tallerman – Giant Thief
Chris F Holm – Dead Harvest
Anne Lyle – The Alchemist of Souls
Madeline Ashby – vN
Lee Battersby – The Corpse-Rat King
Lee Collins – The Dead of Winter
Ramez Naam – Nexus
Emma Newman – Between Two Thorns
Wesley Chu – The Lives of Tao
Jay Posey – Three
Craig Cormick – The Shadow Master

With plenty more to come, including:

Carrie Patel – The Buried Life
Susan Murray – The Waterborne Blade
Ferrett Steinmetz – Flex
Ishbelle Bee – The Singula and Extraordinary Tale of Mirror and Goliath
Alyc Helms – The Dragons of Heaven

4. Marc Gascoigne Wins the 2011 World Fantasy Award

Angry Robot founder and head honcho Marc Gascoigne won the World Fantasy Special Award (Professional) for his work in setting up and running Angry Robot. And bloody well deserved it was, too!

3. DRM-free ebooks

We’re big fans of the ebook format, and we know that many of you are, too. We’re also big fans of not crippling the format with unnecessary and impractical restrictions. This is why we’ve always been DRM-free, and always will be.

2.  Clonefiles – Ebook /Paperback Bundling

We believe if you’ve paid for a paperback you should get the ebook included. In 2012 we ran a limited pilot in the UK to offer this service through independent bookshops. In 2013 we announced we would be opening this pilot up to indie stores in the US, and this has started to happen. It was such a great idea that Amazon announced their version of the programme shortly after us (though many of the ebooks in their Matchbook scheme have to be paid for, albeit at discount).

1. Those Covers!

They say you can’t judge a book by its cover. I say bollocks. But whatever your thoughts on the matter, you certainly can judge a publisher on its covers. And look at some of the gorgeousness we’ve brought you over the last five years, under Marc Gascoigne’s Art Directorshipness. Take your time. Appreciate the different styles, and the love that has gone into each and every one.

Empire State by Adam ChristopherThe Marching Dead by Lee Battersby, April 2013

Zoo City by Lauren BeukesThe Lives of Tao by Wesley ChuThe Mad Scientist's Daughter by Cassandra Rose Clarke - Feb 2013Dead Harvest, by Chris F. HolmThe Damned Busters by Matthew HughesThe Alchemist of Souls by Anne LyleThree, by Jay Posey, artwork by Stephen Mayer-RassowHeartwood by Freya RobertsonSixty-One Nails by Mike Shevdon, new cover artThe Great Game by Lavie Tidhar - you know you want itNightTerrors-300dpiSlights - in UK stores 1 July 09Blackbirds, by Chuck Wendig

 

Lee’s Giveaway

CThe Knights of Breton Court cover (Joey HiFI) - October 2012aroline has asked me to choose a book for today’s giveaway.

Maurice Broaddus’s King Maker (first of the Knights of Breton Court trilogy) was the first book I actively championed when I joined Angry Robot. It’s a fantastic retelling of the Arthurian myth, set on the mean streets of Indianapolis. So, my giveaway is going to be the entire trilogy: The Knights of Breton Court x 5!

Entry Details

To enter, simply comment on this post with your Top 5 TV shows. Winner will be picked at random. Entries will close tomorrow, Tuesday at 12.01pm BST, when we will have Marc’s post with another giveaway!

For brownie points, join in our #AngryRobot5 conversation on Twitter and tell us about your favourite Angry Robot book, or if you haven’t read one yet, which you would like to pick first! Don’t forget to include us: @angryrobotbooks

Angry Robot’s Summer Invasion of Forbidden Planet

Looking forward to this year’s World SciFi Convention (LonCon)? Or, can’t make LonCon and wish you could have an evening with some of your favourite authors before the con starts?

Well, we want to kick-start your LonCon experience with an Angry Robot Summer Invasion of Forbidden Planet, on Wednesday, 13 August at 6pm.

Meet the Authors

Not only will the lovely Anne LyleMike Shevdon and Adam Christopher be present, but come along for your chance to meet Wesley Chu and Madeline Ashby!

Join us for an evening of readings, signing, and robotic dance moves. Enjoy an informal evening of meeting some of your favourite authors and listening to some fantastic fiction!

RSVP

Forbidden Planet have an event page on their Facebook page on which you can RSVP, and I do encourage you to do so. Surprise, surprise, here’s a handy link to said Facebook page! You can also tweet us, @angryrobotbooks, or @forbiddenplanet. Please feel free to share with your friends, colleagues, enemies – hey, we don’t discriminate, and we look forward to seeing you on Wednesday, 13 August!

May
06

Peacemaker Makes a Novel Game

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Congratulations to Marianne de Pierres, whose Peacemaker series has been optioned for adaptation as an interactive game by Stirfire Studios! The full PR is below, but please do join us in congratulating Marianne, here or on Twitter!

Peacemaker Makes a Novel Game:
West Australian creative entrepreneurs combine forces

Peacemaker by Marianne de PierresBestselling Australian science fiction author Marianne de Pierres announced today that Stirfire Studios has optioned her PEACEMAKER series for adaptation as an interactive game.  The novels are published by Angry Robot books.

De Pierres’ books include the award-winning Sentients of Orion, Parrish Plessis, and Night Creatures series. ‘I’m thrilled to be working with Stirfire Studios on this project. They combine creative flair with technical excellence and a passion for what they do. Their most recent game, Freedom Fall, has been a spectacular success.’

Stirfire Studios, created in 2010, has elevated the status of indie-game development in Western Australia. The Studio won the first ever Western Australian Screen Award and was shortlisted in the Australian Game Development Awards with their title Freedom Fall. Stirfire creates visually beautiful games with lush gameplay and exciting new twists on familiar elements.

Stirfire Studios director, Garth Pendergrast, says that the company has a strong vision for the Peacemaker game. ‘We want to create an interactive novel focusing on story and character, imagined with our trademark rich artwork but with no trade-off in the game play. While we are inspired by recent games in the genre, we are designing a new engine to help the player tell their own story.’

Publicity enquiries: reception@curtisbrown.com.au and Stirfire Studios

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Apr
29

Playback: Angry Robot Live Panel #1

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 A huge well done to Mike, Wes, Cassie, Madeline, and Mez on the first
Angry Robot Live Panel.

Hosted by our gregarious US Sales & Marketing Manager Mike Underwood, we learned some valuable lessons from this motley crew – namely, don’t ever ask Madeline Ashby about jetpacks or rush Wesley Chu in his scotch drinking. Watch and listen as they chat about instant communication, the scientific implausabilites of Prometheus, how they respectively became interested in SF, the social uses of SF, and much more. Thanks for everyone who joined in on the hangout and also those who provided questions on Twitter, on #AngryRobotLive.

For those who missed it, watch the full Live Panel here:

Apr
28

Freya Robertson, Award-Winning Author

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It’s been a busy start to the awards season for Angry Robot: Ramez Naam is enjoying 6 placements on 4 awards short-lists and NPR’s best-of list, including the Arthur C. Clarke awardCassandra Rose Clarke was short-listed for the Philip K. Dick awardThe Age Atomic won the Inky Tentacle at the Kitschies; Kaaron Warren and Jo Anderton won at the recent Aurealis Awards; aaaaand Wesley ChuAliette de BodardKameron Hurley, and our own Lee Harris and Mike Underwood are up for Hugos.

But that’s not enough for us. We want MORE.

Luckily enough, we now also have Freya Robertson, winner of the Sir Julius Vogel Award for BEST NOVEL, for Heartwood!

Freya AwardFreya was at the awards ceremony on Saturday, and was delighted to receive the award; read more from Freya on this win here at her blog. For those who have read – and loved Heartwood as much as the members of SFFANZ –  Sunstone is now available!

Click the book links for all the buying info, and click here to buy Heartwood on audio – read by Barnaby Edwards!

Please join us in congratulating Freya – and if you’d like to reach out to her on Twitter, here she is: @epicfreya!

Sunstone, by Freya RobertsonHeartwood by Freya Robertson

Apr
22

Hugo Award Nominations

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On Saturday, the Angry Robot staff members were a happy mix of chocolate-face-stuffing, Easter-con-partying, and usual-weekend-shenanigans…and then, the Hugo Award finalists were announced, and our Easter weekends got even better!

This year we have had our best showing ever with eight nominations:

• John W Campbell Award for best new writer – Wesley Chu, Ramez Naam
• Best Fancast/podcast – Emma Newman‘s “Tea & Jeopardy“, and our own Mike Underwood as part of the Skiffy & Fanty Show team
• Best Related Work – Kameron Hurley
• Best Fan Writer – Kameron Hurley
• Best Novelette (short novel/long short story) – Aliette de Bodard
• and last but definitely not least, Best Editor – Lee Harris (the first *ever* Brit to be nominated as Best Editor in the 50+ years that this award has been running) and do check out Lee’s own blog post about his nomination here and the Angry Robot nominations here

 

Congratulations to all, and roll on the London Worldcon in August, when the results will be announced.

 

cropped-2010header

 

Apr
14

Guest Post: Ferrett Steinmetz

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When I was fifteen, my parents dragged me to a book release party.  Not that I knew it was a book release party; I was, like every fifteen-year-old kid, self-centered to the point that I wore my colon as a hat.  It was at the Goldsteins’ house, so I assumed it was another party celebrating the fact that brave Mrs. Goldstein had survived yet another round of brain surgery. 

But no.  Mrs. Goldstein – a clear-eyed woman who walked with the help of a cane – pressed a hardcover book into my hand.

“I wrote this,” she told me.  “About my experiences, relearning how to walk and talk and write.  It’s a memoir.”  And though I’d read so many stories that I had ink permanently dotted on my nose from sticking it in books, it had never occurred to me that actual people wrote them.  Authors were Gods who lived in little editorial heavens, flinging down books from clouds up high.

But Mrs. Goldstein had written a book.  And taken it to the publishers in New York.  And gotten it published.  She told me all about how she wrote it, how you had to send it in a manila envelope to people, the letters of rejection you’d get, and slowly I came to understand that books – books! – were written by people like you and me.

_________________________________________________________________________________________________

When I was fifteen, I vowed to publish a novel.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________

When I was nineteen, I wrote my first novel: “Schemer and the Magician.”  It was about a nerdy college kid (basically me) and a wiseass college kid (also basically me) who got kidnapped by aliens and sucked into a galactic war OF INCONCIEVABLE CONSEQUENCES.

…It wasn’t very good.

I sent it to two agents, who wisely never responded.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________

When I was twenty-three, I wrote my second novel: “A Cup of Sirusian Coffee.”  It was a Hitchhiker’s Guide To The Galaxy-style riff on the afterlife, where for all eternity you were forced to do whatever you did in life.  Were you a plumber?  Look forward to spending the next five Pleistocene epochs fixing pipes.

I wrote the first three chapters, handed them around to my college buddies, who thought it was hysterical.  So every day I cranked out another chapter, handing out printed manuscripts to a small group of fans who demanded to know what happened next, until eventually I snowballed a slim plot into a musical Ragnarok that shut the universe down.

This one I sent out to three agents, two of whom dutifully informed me that I was not quite as clever as I thought.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________

When I was thirty, I wrote my third novel: “The Autonomist Agenda, Part I.”  Screw my own muse, I thought: this one would be commercial.  So I wrote the first book in a huge and complex fantasy series, complete with smoldering relationships guaranteed to appeal to the ‘shipper crowd, and prophecies that propelled a young boy on the inevitable journey to become a Big Damn Hero, and even a gay warrior because I was Just That Ahead Of The Curve.

(Not that it was revealed he was gay until Part II.  I had Plans, you see.  I’d sell all three books at once!)

I slipped a copy to my friend Catherynne Valente, who’d had some success at this writing gig.  She read part of it, then took me out to a sad lunch at Bob Evans to break the news.

“I guess you could get this published somewhere,” she told me.  “But is this really what you want your name on?”

I guess I didn’t.

But damn, I wanted my name on something.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________

When I was thirty-two, I wrote my fourth novel: “On The Losing Side Of The Dragon.”  Sure, the knight eventually kills the dragon, but what about all those poor schmucks who get killed along the way?

I gave it to my wife.  She informed me she liked how it ended, really liked it, but the beginning was tedious.  She would never have gotten to the good stuff if she hadn’t been, you know, obligated to read my crap on account of our wedding vows consisting of the words “to love, honor, and beta-read.”

I locked myself in my room and cried all evening.  Thirteen years of effort, and I had not managed to write one single novel that anyone wanted to read.  I had not sold one story.

All I’d ever wanted to do was write novels, and I pretty much sucked at it.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________

When I was thirty-five, I wrote my fifth novel: “A Cup Of Sirusian Coffee.”  Wrote the whole goddamned thing from scratch.  It was a funny idea, and my college buddies still asked about it, so clearly I just needed to go back to the drawing board.

This was novel #5 – and that was the toughest one.  See, Stephen King, my favorite Unca Stephen, had written five novels before he sold his first one.  He’d famously wadded up Carrie and thrown it in the trash, and his wife had rescued it, put his ass back in the seat, told him to keep going.  He did.  Fame and fortune resulted.

That meant this was my lucky novel.  This was the one I was guaranteed to publish.  After all, how many novels did you have to write before you got good?

After sending the new manuscript far and wide, I heard back from a publisher two years later.  They told me the opening paragraphs were “interesting” but then it “fell apart quickly… if the author could capture the style of those first paragraphs again, it might be worth it.”

But by then, I’d pretty much given up trying.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________

When I was thirty-eight, Catherynne Valente yelled at me.  “Just send in the damn application,” she said.

“I’m not a good writer,” I told her.  “The Clarion Science Fiction Writers’ Workshop is for serious writers.  I’ve sold three stories in twenty years, for $15 total.  I’m never going to get in.”

She smiled.  “So send it in.  Just to shut me up.”

I did.

I got accepted.

I got scourged.

I got to learn that over the last twenty years, I’d accreted all kinds of bad habits – lazy dialogue, flabby prose, a reliance on recreating stereotypes instead of actually writing about people I knew.  Clarion taught me that I wasn’t a bad writer, I’d just been too overconfident in my raw abilities… and now that I had finally been forced to acknowledge all my weak spots, I could fix those and reinvent myself for the better.

Over the next three years, I sold fourteen stories, five of them at professional rates.  For which I still thank Catherynne.

But I wasn’t quite ready to write a novel.  Not yet.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________

When I was forty-one, I finally got the courage back to work on my sixth novel: a sweeping science-fiction epic called “The Upterlife.”  I spent a year revising it, and – I shit you not – not two hours after I finished the final draft of that damn novel, Mary Robinette Kowal called me up to tell me that my novelette Sauerkraut Station had been nominated for the Nebula Award.

If that wasn’t a signal from God that I was ready to sell a damn novel, what was?  I sent that manuscript to all the best agents, with a killer query, telling them by way, I’m up for a Nebula this year and I just happen to have this novel for you.

They all rejected it.

Every.

Last.

One.
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When I was forty-three, I wrote my seventh novel.  It was Breaking Bad with magic, a desperate bureaucromancer turned to manufacturing enchanted drugs to save his burned daughter, and it was by far the best thing I’d ever written.  I polished that sucker until it shined.  It shined.

But I was two novels beyond Stephen King.  I’d been struggling to get a novel published for twenty-four years now, clawing at the walls of the Word Mines, and I had no hope of anything but oh God I couldn’t stop and I realized that I wasn’t going to stop, that the breath in my body would run out before I stopped writing tales and who the hell cared if I got published or not I was locked in.  I had to create.  I had to.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________

And I sold it.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________

Flex, by Ferrett Steinmetz.  The story of Paul Tsabo, bureaucromancer, his daughter Aliyah, and the kinky videogamemancer Valentine DiGriz, who I’m pretty sure you’re gonna love.  Published by Angry Robot books – the very publisher of whom I said to my wife, “If I could have any publisher take my first book, it’d be Angry Robot.”

Coming to bookstores on September 30th.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________

I don’t care what novel you’re on.

Do not give up.

Apr
03

SFX: Get Your Free AR ebooks!

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SFX247_cover_digi-610x783The lovely folks over at SFX have teamed up with us angrier people and together we’re delighted to bring you TWO free ebooks!

In case you didn’t notice with all our earlier celebrations, we’re pretty proud of reaching our 100th book release – Adam Christopher‘s Hang Wire, and we’re rounding this out with an exclusive offer for all SFX readers.

To get your free copy of Empire State by Adam Christopher and/or (hey, why not get both of them!) Zoo City by Lauren Beukes, follow the instructions in your copy of this month’s SFX.

And funny how I just happen to have some links to hand to help you pick up your copy of SFXPrint version and iPad version.

This free ebook offer is valid until 30th April, and is open to readers worldwide. The ebooks are available in epub and mobi formats.

SFX_247_twitter2 (1)

In all its glory (no, I won’t paste the redeeming instructions):

For tweeting etc

Angry Robot is delighted – nay, thrilled – to announce another amazing project, which is destined to pave the way forward for publishing from now until…

Oh, you know… Whatever. It’s April 1st. Let’s just assume we’ve come up with an Oh My God Most Amazing, Yah prank, and posted it here, and that you fell for it for about 6 seconds before glancing at the date in the top left of this post, and mentally kicking yourself, before saying, “Oh, those most angry of robots – what a wacky crew! They sure done got me!”

panda cubs

And then we’ll all have a laugh and sail off into the sunset on our hover chairs.

Have a picture of some panda cubs.

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PRESS RELEASE: 30 JANUARY 2014: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Angry Robot Books brings ebook bundling program to the USA

KEY NOTE: In 2012, Angry Robot Books began partnering with Indie bookshops in the UK to offer free ebook bundling via the Clonefiles initiative. Angry Robot has been giving DRM-free ebook editions free as companions to all physical books sold at participating Clonefiles stores. Now, Clonefiles is coming to North America.

AR ClonefilesDETAILS: With BitLit as a fulfillment partner, Angry Robot has teamed up with leading independent bookstores McLean and Eakin Books and Prairie Lights Books to offer free ebook editions with all physical copies of Angry Robot Books sold at these two stores.

Angry Robot have always been champions of DRM-free eBook publishing and are been eager to experiment with new business and distribution models. A dual-format offering for Indies is a natural extension of Angry Robot’s customer-first ethos and a great way for Angry Robot to show some love for the USA’s fantastic Indie bookshop scene.

 

Upon purchase of physical book, customers will receive information on how to download the free BitLit app and use it to claim their free ebook edition of Angry Robot Books.

CALLING BOOKSTORES: Angry Robot is looking to expand the program to other independent bookstores across the USA and Canada. Interested bookstores should contact Mike Underwood at mike.underwood@angryrobotbooks.com for more information.

 Prairie Lights Books

http://prairielights.com

 McLean and Eakin Booksellers

http://www.mcleanandeakin.com/

 BitLit

www.bitlit.com

*PRESS RELEASE: 28 January 2014: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE*

Angry Robot Signs Award-Winning Author Kameron Hurley in Two-Book Deal

Angry Robot is excited to announce the signing of Kameron Hurley – the award-winning author of God’s War – for at least two books in the Worldbreaker Saga. Book 1, The Mirror Empire, will be published worldwide in September this year, with the sequel to follow a year later. The worldwide rights deal was negotiated between Senior Editor, Lee Harris and Hannah Bowman of Liza Dawson Associates.

On the eve of a catastrophic event, three unlikely champions must unite a fractured world to avert its extinction.

Khurley Photo-comicKameron Hurley: “Super stoked to be part of the Angry Robot team. They’re a great group of folks publishing an astonishing range of exceptional fiction. Best of all, being among the crazy bunch of authors I see on their list makes me feel right at home. Can’t wait to see The Mirror Empire join the fray.”

Lee Harris: “I’m tremendously excited to be able to welcome Kameron to the Angry Robot conclave. She’s one of the most exciting and talented authors working in the fantasy genre, today, and a great fit for our list.”

 

From the award-winning author of God’s War comes a stunning new series…

About The Mirror Empire:

On the eve of a recurring catastrophic event known to extinguish nations and reshape continents, a troubled orphan evades death and slavery to uncover her own bloody past… while a world goes to war with itself.

In the frozen kingdom of Saiduan, invaders from another realm are decimating whole cities, leaving behind nothing but ash and ruin.

As the dark star of the cataclysm rises, an illegitimate ruler is tasked with holding together a country fractured by civil war, a precocious young fighter is asked to betray his family and a half-Dhai general must choose between the eradication of her father’s people or loyalty to her alien Empress.

Through tense alliances and devastating betrayal, the Dhai and their allies attempt to hold against a seemingly unstoppable force as enemy nations prepare for a coming together of worlds as old as the universe itself.

In the end, one world will rise – and many will perish.

About Kameron: Kameron Hurley is an award-winning author, advertising copywriter, and online scribe. Hurley grew up in Washington State, and has lived in Fairbanks, Alaska; Durban, South Africa; and Chicago. She has degrees in historical studies from the University of Alaska and the University of Kwa-Zulu Natal, specializing in the history of South African resistance movements.

Hurley is the author of God’s WarInfidel, and Rapture, a science-fantasy noir series which earned her the Sydney J. Bounds Award for Best Newcomer and the Kitschy Award for Best Debut Novel. She has been a finalist for the Nebula Award and the Locus Award. Her work has also been included on the Tiptree Award Honor List. Hurley’s short fiction has appeared in magazines such as LightspeedEscapePod, and Strange Horizons, and anthologies such as The Lowest Heaven and Year’s Best SF. Her fiction has been translated into Romanian, Swedish, and Russian. She is also a graduate of Clarion West.

Contact: Publicity Manager Caroline Lambe: caroline.lambe@angryrobotbooks.com

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total-film-magazine-4367-a-1389784791-470-75January’s issue of Total Film not only features on-set exclusives for Spider-Man 2, interviews with Colin Farrell, and reviews of The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug but excitedly, there is a FREE eBook of Ramez Naam‘s Nexus for every reader!

In 2013, the screen rights to Nexus, Ramez’s nanotech mind-control novel, were acquired by Paramount Pictures, with the project to be produced by Mary Parent and Cale Boyter through their Disruption label and Darren Aronofsky and Scott Franklin through their Protozoa banner. Rights acquisitions don’t always mean the movie will come to fruition, but with such fantastic names involved, it’s worth celebrating again!

Lucky Total Film readers can also download copies of Exhibit A‘s Scare Me by Richard Parker which was bought by Relativity Media with Wentworth Miller adapting the novel for the big screen, AND Strange Chemistry‘s Blackwood by Gwenda Bond which MTV has put in development, from Lionsgate Television and Kelsey Grammer’s Grammnet Prods.

Have you read these books? Did you know about their TV/movie potentials? Pick up a copy of this month’s Total Film – either online on Apple or here’s where you can order your print copy – and find out how to download your free copy of these books!

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