Archive for Awards

Who says good news isn’t released on a Friday? Conflux Inc., organisers of the 2014 Aurealis Awards, have announced the finalists for this year’s awards and we are delighted to see Marianne de Pierres in the category for Best Science Fiction Novel with Peacemaker.

Judging Coordinator, Tehani Wessely, said that with over 750 entries across the twelve categories, the judges had a hugely challenging job.

“As is always the case, the judges agreed that entries were of a very high standard and the final decisions were subject to much debate among the panellists. The competition becomes stronger every year.”

The Aurealis Awards ceremony will take place on Saturday, 11 April in Canberra. Wishing Marianne, and all the other finalists, the very best of luck!

MariannePeacemaker by Marianne de Pierres

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The shortlist for the BSFA Awards 2014 have gone live and we’re delighted that Richard Anderson‘s cover for The Mirror Empire has been included for Best Artwork. Richard produced a marvellous cover with his usually arresting artwork, and if you’d like to read more about the cover, here is the link to the cover reveal on A Dribble of Ink including an interview with Kameron Hurley. Congratulations to everyone shortlisted and here’s a reminder of this cover in all its glory:

The Mirror Empire by Kameron Hurley

The Mirror Empire 

Categories : Awards, Cover Art
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The Bullet Catcher's Daughter by Rod DuncanWe’re absolutely delighted to start 2015 with some awards news. Rod Duncan’s superlative alternate history The Bullet-Catcher’s Daughter has made the six-book shortlist for the Philip K Dick Award 2014.

When he’d come down from the ceiling, a joyous Rod Duncan said:

I had no idea that The Bullet-Catcher’s Daughter was even in the running, so discovering it on the shortlist was a complete surprise. If you’ll excuse the British slang – I was gobsmacked! To be standing alongside such wonderful writers and to be up for an award bearing the name of Philip K. Dick – it is a great honour. I feel hugely grateful.

The award’s winner will be announced at Norweson in Seattle, USA on 3 April this year. Further details of that lovely shortlist – really, you should just buy all of them! – and everything else you need to know are on the Philip K Dick Award website. Rod’s sequel Unseemly Science is fast approaching too – it hits stores in May 2015, with a third novel in the Fall of the Gas-Lit Empire series, The Custodian of Marvels, due Spring 2016.

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Nov
18

And the winner is…

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Guest Post: Rod Duncan, author of The Bullet-Catcher’s Daughter, on what winning an award – no matter the size – means to him.

It is a truth universally acknowledged that for every novel being written, an award acceptance speech is also being rehearsed. Novelists are, after all, professional fantasists.

“Me? Are you sure? I really didn’t expect this…”

There are a LOT of words in a novel. No matter how bad the story, the only way you can keep writing to the end is by deluding yourself that it is a gift to global culture. Punters will be grateful to hand over their hard earned cash for the privilege of owning a copy. These aren’t just words – they’re footprints in the sands of time. Of course you’re going to get an award.

“I’d like to thank my English teacher, who spurred me on by telling the class I wouldn’t amount to anything…”

The mind of the novelist is a paradoxical place. As well as being home to this almost pathological narcissism, it is a nest of venomous self-doubts. In the mid-watches of the night you wake with the conviction that all your pathetic scribblings are doomed to failure. Your prose is purple. That plot line at the core of your novel – you subconsciously copied it from an episode of Dr Who. And your grammar! You should have listened to your English teacher after all.

Or is that just me?

Nowhere is this impossible balance of opposite emotions more vividly experienced than at the awards ceremony, itself the focus of hopes and fears. Having consumed a sumptuous meal, which now lies curdling in your stomach, you silently contemplate your chances. It’s not going to be me. Though my book is really good. So it might be me. It should be me. Unless my book is bad and I hadn’t noticed. I’ve just realised that my book is terrible. It’s not going to be me. You continue with this neurosis spin-cycle until the moment arrives and you find yourself staring with a concrete smile at the envelope in the hands of the host.

“The winner is…”

…the other guy. At all costs don’t let the disappointment show. There are cameras pointing at you and everything is HD these days.

But if you do win, it is de rigueur to clutch hands to chest as if in surprise. Then humbly approach the microphone and deliver that acceptance speech you’ve been rehearsing since writing the opening lines of the novel X years ago.

In 2003, I was lucky enough to be shortlisted for the John Creasey Dagger – an international award given for the best debut crime novel in the English language. (Note: when an author says “lucky” in this context it means: “I worked damn hard for that and richly deserved it.”) I didn’t get the prize, though there were only three of us on the shortlist, so it felt like a podium finish.

I found myself in the running for another award that year, for the same novel. And at the second time of asking, I was lucky enough (sic) to win. The Norman King Award for Novel Writing was named in memory of a tutor who taught creative writing in the Adult Education College in Leicester back in the 1950s. Though it is a strictly local affair, the award is taken seriously. There is a meal, followed by speeches. And there is a trophy, resplendent on a wooden plinth. The engraved names of previous winners go back over 50 years, adding historical gravity to the honour.

Last Thursday, the Leicester award ceremony came around again. And I am delighted to report that I found myself being presented with the Norman King award once more – this time for my novel The Bullet Catcher’s Daughter.

As I lined up to have my photograph taken with winners of other prizes, it occurred to me that literary awards really do matter. Even the small ones. Because clutching that trophy, I found all the self-doubt and narcissism melting away. Having someone else say “I value your work” means that, for a time, neither extreme is needed.

Now, where did I put that speech? Ah yes. “I’d like to thank my publisher…”

With thanks to Jacob Ross for the photos!

Categories : AR Authors, Awards
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Aug
18

Robots love Hugos

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The Hugo AwardsSoooo, we can’t imagine that if you have any interest in the wider world of science fiction that you missed the winners of this year’s Hugo Awards, presented as the climax of the massive, and massively enjoyable, Worldcon here in England’s London, aka Loncon 3. But just in case, here’s a completely biased summary:

Kameron Hurley won TWO. As we said there in the hall, hell yeah! In fact, we screamed and whooped and screamed some more.

And that’s not all. We’re so, so proud of our writer friends and colleagues who placed well in the rankings, with nominations for:

Emma Newman, for her sensational Tea & Jeopardy podcast
Both Wesley Chu and Ramez Naam, up for the John W Campbell Award for best new writer (yeah yeah, OK, not strictly a Hugo yadda yadda)
Aliette de Bodard, nominated for her lovely novelette, The Waiting Stars.
Our man Mike Underwood, up as part of the team behind the Skiffy & Fanty Podcast.
And our now-departed but still beloved Lee Harris, nominated for Best Editor (Long Form), a fitting end to his AR years as he heads off to pastures new.

Loads of other great people were justly celebrated too, of course, and you can read up on them, even see all of the breakdowns in how people voted if you like. It’s all been rather lovely. Roll on 2015.

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Congratulations to everyone who was voted onto the recent Best Of lists from Locus, but a special celebration belongs to our very own Emma Newman as Between Two Thorns was included in the Best Fantasy Novel category! The first book in the Split WorldsBetween Two Thorns, has received widespread attention – including a shout-out from The Guardian as “JK Rowling meets Georgette Heyer” – and it certainly belongs in the Top 25 of Best Fantasy Novels. If you have yet to read Between Two Thorns, get yourself to this book page for all the info and read an excerpt.

Well done, Emma!

Between Two Thorns by Emma Newman, March 2013

Categories : AR Authors, Awards
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Jul
14

Nexus Wins the Prometheus Award!

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We are delighted to announce that Ramez Naam‘s Nexus has won the 2014 Prometheus Award from the Libertarian Futurist Society, tying with Cory Doctorow‘s brilliant Homeland!

Ramez was short-listed for both Nexus and its sequel Crux with Nexus described thusly in the awards announcement:

Nexus offers a gripping exploration of politics and new extremes of both freedom and tyranny in a near future where emerging technology opens up unprecedented possibilities for mind control or personal liberation and interpersonal connection.

Ramez Naam: “I’m absolutely honored and thrilled to be receiving the Prometheus Award for Best Novel, and even moreso to be sharing it with Cory Doctorow, a writer who exemplifies what it means to use the written word to fight to expand human freedoms. I wrote Nexus and Crux to explore the potential of neuroscience to link together and improve upon human minds. But I also wrote them to explore the roles of censorship, surveillance, prohibition, and extra-legal state use of force in a future not far from our own. Science and technology can be used to lift people up or to trod them underfoot. Making those abstract future possibilities real in the present is a core goal in my novels. I’m glad the selection committee saw that, and I’m very grateful to them for this award!”

Lee Harris:With his three Nexus books (NexusCrux, and the forthcoming Apex), Ramez Naam has proved to be not only a master storyteller, but also a free thinker, whose writing encourages us – his readers – to think more critically about the world around us. I can’t think of a more fitting award for one of the finest new writers of our generation.”

Ramez will be at Worldcon in London next month to happily receive his award, and if you’d like to see him before this, come along to our Angry Robot Summer Invasion of Forbidden Planet on Wednesday 13 August!

Join us in congratulating Ramez on Twitter!

Nexus by Ramez Naam

Nexus

About the awards

The Prometheus Award, sponsored by the Libertarian Futurist Society (LFS), was established in 1979, making it one of the most enduring awards after the Nebula and Hugo awards, and one of the oldest fan-based awards currently in sf. Presented annually since 1982 at the World Science Fiction Convention, the Prometheus Awards include a gold coin and plaque for the winners.

For more than three decades, the Prometheus Awards have recognized outstanding works of science fiction and fantasy that stress the importance of liberty as the foundation for civilization, peace, prosperity, progress and justice.

For a full list of past Prometheus Award winners in all categories, visit www.lfs.org. Membership in the Libertarian Futurist Society is open to any science fiction fan interested in how fiction can promote an appreciation of the value of liberty.

More information is available at http://lfs.org.

May
01

Arthur C Clarke Award – the results

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The 2014 Arthur C Clarke Award has been won by Ann Leckie for Ancillary Justice.

Congratulations to the winner, and all the finalists – it’s been a great year for science fiction!

Here is the full list of nominees:

Nexus by Ramez Naam (Angry Robot)
God’s War by Kameron Hurley (Del Rey)
Ancillary Justice by Ann Leckie (Orbit)
The Machine by James Smythe (Blue Door)
The Adjacent by Christopher Priest (Gollancz)
The Disestablishment of Paradise by Phillip Mann (Gollancz)

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Special Offer
To celebrate the nomination of Nexus we’re having a special offer on the ebook – head on over to the Robot Trading Company, where you can find a Kindle or ePub version of the book – and its sequel, Crux – for only £1.99! (approximately $2.65). This offer only lasts until Monday 5th of May, so grab your copy now!)

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Apr
28

Freya Robertson, Award-Winning Author

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It’s been a busy start to the awards season for Angry Robot: Ramez Naam is enjoying 6 placements on 4 awards short-lists and NPR’s best-of list, including the Arthur C. Clarke awardCassandra Rose Clarke was short-listed for the Philip K. Dick awardThe Age Atomic won the Inky Tentacle at the Kitschies; Kaaron Warren and Jo Anderton won at the recent Aurealis Awards; aaaaand Wesley ChuAliette de BodardKameron Hurley, and our own Lee Harris and Mike Underwood are up for Hugos.

But that’s not enough for us. We want MORE.

Luckily enough, we now also have Freya Robertson, winner of the Sir Julius Vogel Award for BEST NOVEL, for Heartwood!

Freya AwardFreya was at the awards ceremony on Saturday, and was delighted to receive the award; read more from Freya on this win here at her blog. For those who have read – and loved Heartwood as much as the members of SFFANZ –  Sunstone is now available!

Click the book links for all the buying info, and click here to buy Heartwood on audio – read by Barnaby Edwards!

Please join us in congratulating Freya – and if you’d like to reach out to her on Twitter, here she is: @epicfreya!

Sunstone, by Freya RobertsonHeartwood by Freya Robertson

Apr
22

Hugo Award Nominations

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On Saturday, the Angry Robot staff members were a happy mix of chocolate-face-stuffing, Easter-con-partying, and usual-weekend-shenanigans…and then, the Hugo Award finalists were announced, and our Easter weekends got even better!

This year we have had our best showing ever with eight nominations:

• John W Campbell Award for best new writer – Wesley Chu, Ramez Naam
• Best Fancast/podcast – Emma Newman‘s “Tea & Jeopardy“, and our own Mike Underwood as part of the Skiffy & Fanty Show team
• Best Related Work – Kameron Hurley
• Best Fan Writer – Kameron Hurley
• Best Novelette (short novel/long short story) – Aliette de Bodard
• and last but definitely not least, Best Editor – Lee Harris (the first *ever* Brit to be nominated as Best Editor in the 50+ years that this award has been running) and do check out Lee’s own blog post about his nomination here and the Angry Robot nominations here

 

Congratulations to all, and roll on the London Worldcon in August, when the results will be announced.

 

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Apr
07

Awards Down Under

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It’s been a busy weekend for awards in Australia and New Zealand this past weekend

Firstly, at Conflux, the Aurealis Awards were presented. The Aurealis Awards recognise the achievements of Australian science fiction, fantasy and horror writers.

Angry Robot’s very own Kaaron Warren and Jo Anderton were among the winners. Kaaron carried off the trophy for Best Science Fiction Short Story (for Air, Water and the Grove) and Jo won Best Collection for The Bone Chime Song and Other Stories.

The full list of winners can be found here.

Heartwood by Freya Robertson

Meanwhile, across the Tasman Sea, the finalists of the Sir Julius Vogel Awards 2014 were announced. The Sir Julius Vogel awards are New Zealand-based fan voted awards for various endeavours in the science fiction, fantasy or horror fields. Heartwood by Freya Robertson is one of 6 books shortlisted in the Best Novel category.

Congratulations to Kaaron and Jo, and the very best of luck to Freya!

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Mar
25

Nexus and Crux ebooks – half price!

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Nexus, by Ramez Naam
We already knew that Nexus by Ramez Naam was shortlisted for the Kistchies Red Tentacle Award.

Last week we discovered that Nexus was is also shortlisted for the Arthur C Clarke Award.

And this morning, we were told that both Nexus and its sequel Crux have been shortlisted for the Prometheus Award!

Come on, Ramez – give some other folk a chance!

Anyway, to celebrate the awesomeness that is both Nexus and Crux, we have decided to have a time-limited HALF-PRICE offer on the ebooks.

Crux by Ramez Naam

From now until the end of the month:
Kindle readers in the UK can pick up a copy of Nexus and Crux at Amazon.co.uk for just £2.74 per book! (List price is £5.49).

Kindle readers everywhere else, and those who use non-Kindle ebook readers can pick up a copy of Nexus and/or Crux for the same price at the Robot Trading Company.

(£2.74 at the Robot Trading company equates to approximately US$3.70, so not quite half price, but pretty darned close!)

Go get them now, while the price is low!

 

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ALL the award nominations. We want them ALL.

Ramez Naam Ramez Naam is certainly doing his best to bring them to us. We recently had Nexus  in The Golden Tentacle category at the Kitschies, and Nexus is also shortlisted for the soon-to-be-announced Arthur C. Clarke Award. We are delighted to now announce that both Nexus AND Crux have been shortlisted for the Prometheus Award for Best Novel.

Here’s the full shortlist:

Homeland, by Cory Doctorow (TOR Books)
A Few Good Men, by Sarah Hoyt (Baen Books)
Crux, by Ramez Naam (Angry Robot Books)
Nexusby Ramez Naam (Angry Robot Books)
Brilliance, by Marcus Sakey (Thomas & Mercer)

The awards will be presented during Loncon 3, the 72nd annual World Science Fiction Convention August 14-18, 2014, in London.

Congratulations to everyone shortlisted, with a special great big WOOOOT to Ramez Naam!

Crux by Ramez NaamNexus, by Ramez Naam

 

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Mar
18

Arthur C Clarke Award – shortlist 2014

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Nexus by Ramez Naam

The shortlist of this year’s Arthur C Clarke Award was announced this evening in London, and we’re absolutely delighted to announce that – yet again – we have a book nominated.

NEXUS by Ramez Naam joins a very strong shortlist, which also includes God’s War by new Angry Robot author, Kameron Hurley.

The full shortlist is:

~ Nexus by Ramez Naam (Angry Robot)
God’s War by Kameron Hurley (Del Rey)
The Machine by James Smythe (Blue Door)
Ancillary Justice by Anne Leckie (Orbit)
The Disestablishment of Paradise by Phillip Mann (Gollancz)
The Adjacent by Christopher Priest (Gollancz)

The winner will be announced at a ceremony on Thursday May 1st at the Royal Society, London, and will be presented with a cheque for £2,014 (approx US$3,338) and the award itself, a commemorative bookend. But especially the cash.

Congratulations to all the finalists (especially Ramez and Kameron, of course).

It appears we have not lived and fought in vain!

Categories : AR Authors, Awards
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Feb
17

The Aurealis Awards

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The Marching Dead by Lee Battersby, April 2013

The Aurealis Awards are the premier Australian awards, recognising the achievements of Australian SF.F and WTF writers. The 2013 finalists have just been announced, and – as ever – the shortlist is chock full of literary fabulosity.

In the Best Horror Novel category, Lee Battersby‘s The Marching Dead is part of a very strong shortlist.

Elsewhere, other Angry Robot authors fight the good fight:

Other AR authors’ nominations
Jo Anderton‘s Mah Song (shortlisted for Best YA Short Fiction)
Jo Anderton’s Fencelines (shortlisted for Best Horror Short Fiction)
Jo Anderton’s The Last Tiger (shortlisted for Best Science Fiction Short Fiction)
Jo Anderton’s Mah Song (also shortlisted for Best Science Fiction Short Fiction)
Jo Anderton’s The Bone Chime Song and Other Stories (shortlisted for Best Collection)
Kaaron Warren‘s The Human Moth (shortlisted for Best Horror Short Fiction)
Kaaron Warren’s Air, Water and the Grove (shortlisted for Best Science Fiction Short Fiction)

Good luck to all of the nominees!

See the full list of nominations, here.

Categories : Angry Robot, Awards
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