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Black Friday Ebook Sale! 50% off Angry Robot Ebooks at the Robot Trading Co.

Do you want to get 50% off any Angry Robot, Strange Chemistry or Exhibit A ebook? Read More→

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We’ve got yet another gorgeous new book cover to show off today. Here’s the artwork for Any Other Name, the second book in Emma Newman‘s utterly fabulous urban fantasy series The Split Worlds, with oodles of lovely twiddly bits (technical term, there) by the wonderfully talented Sarah J. Coleman:

Any Other Name by Emma Newman, Artwork by Sarah J. Coleman

Lovely stuff, no? Thanks to Charlotte and the gang at the Central Illustration Agency for sterling help too.

We’ll be publishing Any Other Name in June and the third part of the series, All is Fair, will follow in October. We don’t hang about, us Robots.

Categories : Angry Robot, Cover Art
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Readers of the mighty IO9.com have already been treated to a first-look at the cover art for Jay Posey‘s first Angry Robot novel – Three, part one of The Duskwalker Cycle – and will have had the opportunity to read an exclusive extract as well.

For anyone who missed out, here’s a second look at Steven Meyer-Rassow‘s brooding, menacing artwork:

Three, by Jay Posey

Three will be hitting bookstore shelves near you when we publish in August this year.

Categories : Angry Robot, Cover Art
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Today is the official UK print publication day for Angry Robot’s April releases. UK-based readers who prefer the feel of something papery beneath their fingertips can now grab themselves a copy of each of the following:

The Marching Dead, the second of Lee Battersby‘s hugely entertaining fantasy quests starring reluctant King-of-the-Dead Marius don Hellespont, plus: The Age Atomic, sequel to Adam Christopher‘s genre-bending, convention-defying debut, Empire State, plus: Black Feathers, the first part of Joseph D’Lacey‘s Black Dawn duology; a post-eco-apocalyptic, darkly fantastical fable for our times.

See below for more info on all three of these brand new genre fiction delights and then hot-foot it to your nearest bricks-and-mortar bookstore and treat yourself to some top-notch genre fiction. Go on, you know you deserve it…

 

The Marching Dead by Lee Battersby, April 2013The Marching Dead

by Lee Battersby

Find the dead a King, save himself, win the love of his life, live happily ever after. No wonder Marius dos Helles is bored. But now something has stopped the dead from, well, dying.

It’s up to Marius, Gerd, and Gerd’s not-dead-enough Granny to journey across the continent and put the dead back in the afterlife where they belong.

File Under: Fantasy [ Dead Reckoning | Strange Problems | By Royal Decree | Still Running ]

And here’s a link to yesterday’s exclusive short story by Lee.

 

The Age Atomic, by Adam Christopher, art & design by Will StaehleThe Age Atomic

by Adam Christopher

The sequel to Empire State – the superhero-noir fantasy thriller set in the other New York.

The Empire State is dying. The Fissure connecting the pocket universe to New York has vanished, plunging the city into a deep freeze and the populace are demanding a return to Prohibition and rationing as energy supplies dwindle.

Meanwhile, in 1954 New York, the political dynamic has changed and Nimrod finds his department subsumed by a new group, Atoms For Peace, led by the mysterious Evelyn McHale.

As Rad uncovers a new threat to his city, Atoms For Peace prepare their army for a transdimensional invasion. Their goal: total conquest – or destruction – of the Empire State.

File Under: Science Fiction [ Splitting the Atoms | Angry Robots | Crossing | Universal Destruction ]

Meet Adam tonight at Forbidden Planet, London.

 

Black Feathers by Joseph D'Lacey, April 2013Black Feathers

by Joseph D’Lacey

It is the Black Dawn, a time of environmental apocalypse, the earth wracked and dying.

It is the Bright Day, a time long generations hence, when a peace has descended across the world.

In each era, a child shall be chosen. Their task is to find a dark messiah known only as the Crowman. But is he our saviour – or the final incarnation of evil?

File Under: Fantasy [ The Crowman | Joined Through Time | The Last Keeper | The Journey Begins ]

 Meet Joseph tomorrow night at the Big Green Bookshop, London.
Categories : Angry Robot, Books
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Gentle readersThe Marching Dead by Lee Battersby, April 2013, on this, the eve of the official publication date of The Marching Dead – sequel to The Corpse-Rat King and therefore the second novel to recount the misadventures of renowned scoundrel Marius don Hellespont, as told to us by the greatly esteemed and utterly unscoundrely Mr Lee Battersby – Angry Robot is delighted to present this short tale, by way of aperitif before tomorrow’s main event… enjoy!

Lying Like Cards

An hour ago there had been six at the table. Now there were two. Marius don Hellespont, late of His Automancer’s Court of Taslingham, even later of the cells beneath the court, took a moment to glance down at his cards before casually flicking over a stack of riner coins so they splashed across the green paper tablecloth.

“Whatever that adds up to,” he said, deliberately yawning. The fat Tallian across from him pursed his lips.

“That is bad etiquette, sir.”

“In this fine place?” Marius waved a hand at the shabby, peeling wallpaper, the warped floorboards, and the boarded up windows that surrounded them. “Where are my manners?” He nodded at the coins. “Whatever that adds up to. See it or raise, tubby.”

The fat man waited enough that Marius knew he was beaten. The game of Kingdom was a complex one, if you paid attention to the cards, and it became more difficult the fewer players were at the table. Ostensibly, the object was to build the hand most closely resembling the current ruling class: Royal family, if you were in Scorby, Council of Elders in Zerpha, Automancer’s Cabal in Taslingham, and so on. If you were paying attention to the cards. Only the most trusting of beginners did that.

Real players, and Marius was a real player, knew that the object of the game was much simpler: to take your opponent’s money. The cards were immaterial. What counted was keeping your opponent off-balance– learning their tells, their psychological weaknesses, and then exploiting them. Like all truly great sports, Kingdom was won by the one who best played the man. The Tallian hesitated the tiniest smidgeon, and Marius had him.

“Gods damn it.” The fat man blew out his cheeks, aiming to recover lost bravado. “Gods damn.” He made a show of counting the coins, then counting them again. Marius very deliberately did not leer like a greedy baby snatcher. “All right,” his victim said. “All right.” He riffled his stack, came to the decision Marius knew he was coming to all along. “All in.” He moved his pile into the centre of the table.

Marius didn’t count them. He had no need. He knew he had the bet covered. He paused just long enough to make him sweat, then casually smiled and laid his cards face down before him. “Call.”

A queen, a prince, a knight, three nobles, a peasant. Pretty close. Good enough to win most hands. The fat man stared at them for several seconds, then raised his gaze to Marius.

“One peasant.” He snapped the card onto the table. “Three nobles.” Snap. “One knight.” Snap. “One prince.” He held up the last card, turned it so that it faced Marius. “One King.” He laid it down with a grin, slid it into place with the others. “My hand, I think.”

He reached out to draw in Marius’ coins. To their right, a door crashed open.

“What the fuck?” Both players reared back from the table as if stung. A soldier was standing in the doorway.

“The King!” he roared. “The King has been killed!”

“What?”

“Assassins from the house of Belchester! The King is dead!” He flung himself back out the door. The room erupted in a mad scramble to follow him: off duty guardsmen and civil militiamen hurling themselves towards distant guardhouses, to swords tucked over lintels, to scythes and halberds and sharpening wheels in front yards. As the room emptied, Marius raised a sympathetic eyebrow at his stunned opponent, and began scooping coins into his pockets.

“Tough timing,” he said, and rose before the fat Tallian could recover himself enough to object. “Still, the cards never lie.”

# # #

Marius sat in a booth at the back of ‘The Hauled Keel’ and watched his young apprentice Gerd weave through the crowd, two tankards of Krehmlager in his beefy fists, plonking down opposite his master and passing one over. Marius raised it in salute, and took a long swallow.

“You hid the armour?” he asked, once he’d recovered his breath. Gerd took a sip, and choked.

“In a barrel on Pudding Alley.”

“Good. Good.” Marius removed a short stack of coins from a pocket and slid it over. “Your share.” Gerd accepted it without counting. Trusting lad. Stupid boy. Marius felt the weight of all the winnings secreted around his body, and took another swallow to help ignore a sudden pang of conscience. From outside came shouts, and a clattering so loud that even the seasoned drinkers within the pub were silent for a moment.

“What’s that?” Gerd stood, and turned towards the window. Marius tilted his head.

“Soldiers,” he said after a moment. “Forming up in front of Traitor’s Gate.”

“Isn’t that the…”

“Road to Belchester?” Marius nodded. Gerd slowly sat down.

“You don’t think..?”

Marius took a long draught of his lager, shook his head, and signalled a passing girl for another while he recovered the feeling in his face. Krehmlager was traditionally strong. The Hauled Keel’s brewing room deserved its own hospital. “No,” he said, finally, flipping a coin through suddenly-clumsy fingers. “And even if there’s a little skirmish or something, nothing will come out of it but opportunity.”

The new pints arrived. He picked his up and gestured to Gerd to do the same. “Drink up,” he said. “We’ve got to get our stuff and be ready to follow them.” He smiled, thinking of the riches to be had on the battlefield to come. “I’m going to teach you how to be a corpse-rat.”

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Black Feathers by Joseph D'Lacey, April 2013Want to nab yourself one of four signed Advanced Reading Copies (ooooh! collectable!) of the astounding new post-apocalyptic dark fantasy Black Feathers by the awesome Joseph D’Lacey? Of course you do!

You’ll need to be:

1) based in the UK or Ireland
2) a Goodreads member
3) signed in to your account

…and then you should head on over to Goodreads Giveaway page and click the ‘Enter to Win’ button. That’s all you need to do.

The Winners will be selected at random by the Goodreads web elves (or an algorythm… something behind-the-scenes-y anyhow) after the closing date of April 5th (this Friday!) and the Winners’ books will be posted out by us as soon as we can get around to it next week.

Good luck!

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If you’ve been anywhere near Tor.com since yesterday afternoon (/ evening / morning, depending on your timezone) then you’ll most likely have feasted your eyes on the exclusive cover art reveal for A Discourse in Steel, the second Tale of Egil and Nix by Paul S. Kemp. But in case you missed it (do try to pay attention next time), here it is in all its be-weaponed glory:

A Discourse In Steel by Paul S. Kemp

(Click that pic for a larger, even more in-yer-face-ier version)

The artist credit for this particular beauty goes to Lee Gibbons. A Discourse in Steel will be published in July, but if you’d like to whet your appetite with a series of sneaky peaks (of course you would!) then you can do so over at Paul S. Kemp‘s website.

Categories : Angry Robot, Books, Cover Art
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Mar
28

Robot Round-Up, 28.03.13

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Hello and welcome to a double-bank-holiday Easter special Robot Round-Up. No choccie eggs or anything, just lots and lots of luvverly links to some Red Hot Angry Robot Action. Without further ado:

Black Feathers by Joseph D'Lacey, April 2013It’s US/Ebook release week for Black Feathers, the first part of Joseph D’Lacey‘s post-eco-apocalyptic dark fantasy duology, The Black Dawn and it’s fantastic to see a whole gang of reviewers (of clearly impeccable taste, we might add) getting right behind the book:
• Chris at All Things Urban Fantasy, said: “D’Lacey does an excellent job interweaving the two narratives and the story moves along at a brisk pace … D’Lacey’s definitely an author you should be checking out and this is an excellent book with which to start.”
• Ryan at Fantasy Book Review said: “Black Feathers is one of the best books I have read this year … I don’t think I’ve read a book quite like Black Feathers, but I know I liked it and I suspect that many of you will like it too.”
• In the same double-header at Fantasy Book Review, Jasper added: “Black Feathers is a unique take on horror and it was for a me a story that did not turn out the way I expected. The narration of the book was great and it felt like the myth surrounding the Crowman is being read to me, being handed down to the next generation.”
• Tabitha at My Shelf Confessions said: “Seldom does it happen that I get so upset by a book that I literally have nightmares after having read it … If you like a gritty apocalyptic that will have you thinking this may be for you but definitely not recommended for the feint of heart, there be no rainbows and fluffy bunnies here kiddos.”
• Lou at More 2 Read said: “This story has epic qualities like that of The Dark Tower series by Stephen King that went on for many volumes. The Black Dawn Saga has plenty more to come in its next instalment”.
• Leanna at Leeanna.me said: “Read it. If, like me, you feel like you’ve read every post-apocalyptic book out there, you haven’t. Black Feathers is something different, with a new take on the end of the world.”

Joseph was also interviewed by Leeanna at Leeanna.me, delving into the background to Black Feathers and the Black Dawn duology, and by Kristin at My Bookish Ways, talking about Black Feathers and his writing career to-date.

The Age Atomic, by Adam Christopher, art & design by Will StaehleAlso out this week we have The Age Atomic, the sequel to Adam Christopher‘s dimension-shattering debut Empire State. It was reviewed by Christian DuChateau for CNN.com, who said: “The Age Atomic defies classification as it incorporates elements across the sci-fi and fantasy spectrum. Christopher has let his imagination run wild, with some fantastic results.” Christian also interviewed Adam in the same article – well worth a look-see. Chris at All Things Urban Fantasy also took a look and said: “You’ve got political intrigue, super heroes and villains, and a cracking good mystery. What’s not to like? My only word of warning though is that this is not a series you can just jump in to. You do need to read the previous volume or you’ll be completely lost. Which is a good thing, because the first book is stellar as well.”

Speaking of Empire State, OzNoir posted a review at Just a Guy That Likes to Read, which concluded: “Empire State is not an easily definable novel in terms of confining it within a single genre as there are simply too many facets and faces to the story Christopher tells … This is a must read for fans of superhero and sci-fi fiction.”

Adam has also been doing a superb job of putting himself about online this week, with a guest post on John Scalzi‘s Whatever on the subject of The Big Idea behind The Age Atomic, another guest post for Mary Robinette Kowall, telling her all about his Favourite Bit from the book, He’s also answered Ten Questions put to him by the mighty Chuck Wendig and was interviewed by Lawrence M. Schoen for his regular Eating Authors column, on the subject of all things foody.

The Lives of Tao by Wesley ChuWe’ve spot another couple of early reviews of Wesley Chu‘s forthcoming (May!) debut The Lives of Tao, from Lisa at Wilder’s Book Reviews who said: “I think The Lives of Tao was very well done and I will definitely keep my eye out for the next one. Between the humor and the originality of the story, I would certainly recommend reading it.” and from Josh at Examiner.com, who said: “The Lives of Tao marvelously casts all of war, science, politics, religion, and economics into a stark new light. It switches well between action-packed scenes and philosophical discussions about human nature and the pitfalls of manipulation, even guided by the best of intents.”

Emma Newman‘s Between Two Thorns was reviewed by
Theresa at Terror Tree who said: “It has been a very long time since I have read a book that has enthralled me to the extent I become miserable at the thought of it ending. Well done Newman. I want more.” Good news, Theresa: the sequel, Any Other Name will be out in June.

Matthew Hughes‘s third To Hell and Back novel, Hell To Pay, was reviewed by Mieneke at A Fantastical Librarian who called it: “a highly enjoyable read, with some interesting philosophical underpinnings and surprising twists. The book makes for a satisfying ending to the To Hell & Back series, which gave us a quirky, off-beat story about an unlikely super hero, with unexpected depths.”

Nexus by Ramez NaamRamez Naam‘s Nexus is still going strong, with new reviews this week from Stephen L. Macknik for the Scientific American Illusion Chasers blog: “This sophisticated page-turning techno-thriller is one of my favorite stories of all time … Naam is remarkable in his ability to address deep philosophical concepts while keeping the story line light, fast, and action-packed.” and from Larry at 42 Webs: “Reading Ramez Naam reminded me of a time when I was younger, in my high school years, when I dove into books that some would say were well beyond my comprehension … I expect much from Naam. He is a talented writer who can produce hope like Crichton but still make us feel weary like Philip K. Dick.” Larry also added Nexus (and the first To Hell and Back book, The Damned Busters) to his Top Ten Books I Recommend The Most list.

Lee Collins‘s weird western debut The Dead of Winter was reviewed at OwlCat Mountain: “I blazed through this book in record time and found much to enjoy. I’m looking forward to the second novel, which promises to be just as engrossing as the first. The Dead of Winter is a great read for these cold nights as we transition into spring.”

Paul S. Kemp‘s first tale of Egil and Nix, The Hammer and the Blade, was reviewed by Mike at Stuff And/Or Junk: “The story moves fast, the dialogue is witty, the combat is oiled slick and the characters are crazy enjoyable. It’s straight up fantasy but it’s not kowtowing to the stodgy traditionalist parts of the genre. The Hammer and the Blade is fresh with life in it, the kind of fantasy novels I want more of.”

Anne Lyle‘s first Night’s Masque book, The Alchemist of Souls was reviewed by Lor for Wilder’s Book Reviews, who had lots of good things to say about the book and only one that wasn’t: “My only complaint about this novel is that it was over too quickly. My first read was in one sitting over about 6 hours. It is addictive, the characters make you care, and the setting is beautiful. What more can you ask for from a novel?”

Zoo City author Lauren Beukes – whose brand new novel The Shining Girls will be published in the UK and South Africa in a month or so and a couple of months later in the US – was interviewed by Sci Fi Now, wherein she explains how to write a science fiction novel (in case you’ve ever wondered…)

And finally, brand new Angry Robot author Freya Robertson has braved Lee Battersby‘s blog as a guest of his Room 102 feature, wherein she gets to remove something from the universe for ever and ever and ever. Which is nice.

That’s your lot for this week. We’re off to the pub for four days. Except for Angry Robot Lee, who’ll be at Eastercon, in the bar, instead. Have a good holiday, everyone!

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The Age Atomic, by Adam Christopher, The Marching Dead, Lee Battersby and Black Feathers by Joseph D’Lacey are all officially on-sale in the UK/EU next week (from Thursday 6th to be precise), but are already our in US/CAN print and ebook editions.

Here’s a taster from each to whet your appetite for more…

Click on the widgets below to activate them and read a free sample from each book, or use the links beneath each widget to visit issuu.com, where you’ll find sharing buttons, embed code, links and all sorts, should you wish to add any or all of these extracts to your own blog or website.

 

The Age Atomic

by Adam Christopher

The sequel to Empire State – the superhero-noir fantasy thriller set in the other New York.

The Empire State is dying. The Fissure connecting the pocket universe to New York has vanished, plunging the city into a deep freeze and the populace are demanding a return to Prohibition and rationing as energy supplies dwindle.

Meanwhile, in 1954 New York, the political dynamic has changed and Nimrod finds his department subsumed by a new group, Atoms For Peace, led by the mysterious Evelyn McHale.

As Rad uncovers a new threat to his city, Atoms For Peace prepare their army for a transdimensional invasion. Their goal: total conquest – or destruction – of the Empire State.


Read, download, share and embed via Issuu.com

 

Black Feathers

by Joseph D’Lacey

It is the Black Dawn, a time of environmental apocalypse, the earth wracked and dying.

It is the Bright Day, a time long generations hence, when a peace has descended across the world.

In each era, a child shall be chosen. Their task is to find a dark messiah known only as the Crowman. But is he our saviour – or the final incarnation of evil?


Read, download, share and embed via Issuu.com

 

The Marching Dead

by Lee Battersby

Find the dead a King, save himself, win the love of his life, live happily ever after. No wonder Marius dos Helles is bored. But now something has stopped the dead from, well, dying.

It’s up to Marius, Gerd, and Gerd’s not-dead-enough Granny to journey across the continent and put the dead back in the afterlife where they belong.


Read, download, share and embed via Issuu.com
Categories : Angry Robot, Extracts, Free
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Calling all genre fiction lovers of the United States of America, Canada and genre fiction Ebook buyers the world over! Although they’re not officially published until Thursday 3rd April, today is the on-sale date for the US/CAN print and Ebook editions of three brand new Angry Robot books!

This month we’ve got a trio of truly terrific new releases for you to feast your eyes and spend your hard-earned reading time on: The Age Atomic, sequel to Adam Christopher‘s genre-bending, convention-defying debut, Empire State, plus: The Marching Dead, the second of Lee Battersby‘s hugely entertaining fantasy quests starring reluctant King-of-the-Dead Marius don Hellespont, plus: Black Feathers, the first part of Joseph D’Lacey‘s Black Dawn duology; a post-eco-apocalyptic, darkly fantastical fable for our times.

See below for more info on all three of these brand new genre fiction delights and then hot-foot it to your nearest bricks-and-mortar bookstore, or click over to your favourite online retailer – including our very own Robot Trading Company of course – and then you might as well cancel any plans you had for the Easter weekend… you’re going to be too busy reading for any of that chocolate egg nonsense.

 

The Age Atomic, by Adam Christopher, art & design by Will StaehleThe Age Atomic

by Adam Christopher

The sequel to Empire State – the superhero-noir fantasy thriller set in the other New York.

The Empire State is dying. The Fissure connecting the pocket universe to New York has vanished, plunging the city into a deep freeze and the populace are demanding a return to Prohibition and rationing as energy supplies dwindle.

Meanwhile, in 1954 New York, the political dynamic has changed and Nimrod finds his department subsumed by a new group, Atoms For Peace, led by the mysterious Evelyn McHale.

As Rad uncovers a new threat to his city, Atoms For Peace prepare their army for a transdimensional invasion. Their goal: total conquest – or destruction – of the Empire State.

File Under: Science Fiction [ Splitting the Atoms | Angry Robots | Crossing | Universal Destruction ]

 

The Marching Dead by Lee Battersby, April 2013The Marching Dead

by Lee Battersby

Find the dead a King, save himself, win the love of his life, live happily ever after. No wonder Marius dos Helles is bored. But now something has stopped the dead from, well, dying.

It’s up to Marius, Gerd, and Gerd’s not-dead-enough Granny to journey across the continent and put the dead back in the afterlife where they belong.

File Under: Fantasy [ Dead Reckoning | Strange Problems | By Royal Decree | Still Running ]

 

 

Black Feathers by Joseph D'Lacey, April 2013The Marching Dead

by Joseph D’Lacey

It is the Black Dawn, a time of environmental apocalypse, the earth wracked and dying.

It is the Bright Day, a time long generations hence, when a peace has descended across the world.

In each era, a child shall be chosen. Their task is to find a dark messiah known only as the Crowman. But is he our saviour – or the final incarnation of evil?

File Under: Fantasy [ The Crowman | Joined Through Time | The Last Keeper | The Journey Begins ]

 
Categories : Angry Robot, Books
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Mar
22

Robot Round-Up, 22.03.13

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Hello and welcome to this week’s whizz round all the online Angry Robot Action that’s fit to link to. Without further ado:

Between Two Thorns by Emma Newman, March 2013Emma Newman‘s Between Two Thorns was reviewed by Kathy at Kindle-aholic’s Book Pile, who said: “This is a book that contains MANY THINGS. This can be tricky sometimes … [but] Newman managed to corral the different worlds, characters and machinations to deliver an engaging read that left me wanting more.”

And you can enter a giveaway at The Founding Fields for your chance to win one of two copies of the book, before the closing date of April 1st.

Matthew Hughes‘s third To Hell and Back novel, Hell to Pay, was reviewed by David Brzeski for the British Fantasy Society and he said: “The first book in the series was very good, the second was better. The events of those books were leading up to this final volume in the trilogy and it’s the best yet.”

Lee Collins‘s second Cora Oglesby novel, She Returns From War was also reviewed by Kathy at Kindle-aholic’s Book Pile, who found the change in POV-focus from book one a bit of a wrench, but came to appreciate the twist: “I was reminded a few times of the movie Unforgiven, with the younger generation getting a look at the real life of a legend, and also learning about the costs of living such a life.”

Lee also had a chat with Larry at 42 Webs this week, all about The Dead of Winter, She Returns From War and his favourite genre books and writers.

Black Feathers by Joseph D'Lacey, April 2013Joseph D’Lacey‘s Black Feathers, the first part of the Black Dawn duology, which will be with you next week in US/CAN print and global ebook, received a 4.5/5 star review from Rebecca at Book Chick City, who said: “I really did love this book, as it had everything I was looking for and more, and really redefined the genres of fantasy and dystopian fiction. I know the two genres have been merged before, but this book just had that special un-put-down-able spark I couldn’t resist.”

Joseph has written a guest post for Upcoming4.me on the subject of the story behind Black Feathers. And he’s also endured a grilling from Chuck Wendig to answer Ten Questions About Black Feathers

Wesley Chu‘s The Lives of Tao is out in May and Wesley was the guest of Abhinav Jain’s latest Names: A New Perspective guest post series this week, talking about the importance of appropriately-named villains. You can also read an exclusive excerpt at Tor.com. And if you’re a US-based Goodreads user, you can put your name in the hat to win a signed ARC copy of The Lives of Tao by visiting Goodreads.com and clicking the ‘Enter to Win’ button. Easy as.

Cara Fielder, writing for the Waterstones Blog, has taken a look at the future of SF and declared that a good-sized chunk of it is Adam Christopher shaped. Adam has also been releasing a series of teaser excerpts from The Age Atomic, the soon-to-be-released sequel to Empire State. The latest snippet went live today at Em’s Place.

Wesley Chu, Adam Christopher and Tim Waggoner all participated in the latest SF Signal mind-meld. on the subject of ‘Reboots – The Good, The Bad and The Unnecessary’.

The Mad Scientist's Daughter by Cassandra Rose Clarke - Feb 2013Cassandra Rose Clarke‘s The Mad Scientist’s Daughter was treated to an extremely thorough, in-depth reading by Michael Ann Dobbs for IO9.com, with the following conclusion: “It’s not a story of future heroism. It’s not even, really, a story about robots. It’s a story of live and failure and expectations. It is, perhaps, in its relentless examination of one woman’s life, one of the most realistic science fiction stories ever told.” And Adam-Troy Castro, writing for the (print only) Sci Fi Magazine enjoyed the novel’s characterisation: “Cat is a finely etched character, difficult, distant, and living in denial of her true feelings for years … Cassandra Rose Clarke does a fine job of staying inside her protagonist’s head, and capturing what it’s like to drift through life without the will or the opportunity to make the best decisions.” The book was also on was on the receiving end of a glowing review from Leah at Uncorked Thoughts, who said: “I found this novel absolutely fascinating … It has so many themes and issues running through it and it’s absolutely brilliant. If you’re a science-fiction lover, a robot lover, or even a lover of books which delve into romance, tragedies and the issues of real life then this book is definitely for you!”

Anne Lyle‘s The Alchemist of Souls and Lee Collins‘s The Dead of Winter have been entered into the BookSpotCentral 7th Annual Book Tournament. Voting will commence on March 21st and will involve all sorts of emailing and Facebook liking… check out the link for full details and vote, vote, vote!

Anne has also announced her founder-member status of the 16-strong fantasy writing team at the new author community The Booksworn. Check it out, fantasy fans!

Jo Anderton isn’t the only AR author who’s been nominated for an Aurelis Award or three – Kaaron Warren is also a triple nominee. Congrats Kaaron!

Aaaand that’s everything we’ve spotted in the past seven days or so. We’ve got a double bank holiday coming up in the UK next weekend, so depending on how things go there’ll either be a shorter Round-Up next Thursday or a bumper double-dose the Friday afterwards. See you then!

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The Corpse-Rat King, by Lee BattersbyHot on the heels of the news that Jo Anderton has been shortlisted for three Aurealis Awarda comes news of another Angry Robot author with an Australian award nomination.

This time the shortlistee is Mr Lee Battersby, whose debut novel The Corpse-Rat King is one of three books shortlisted for the 2012 Australian Shadows Award – awarded to “the stories and collections that best typify the horror genre, delivering a sense of ‘creeping dread’, leaving the reader with chills and a reluctance to turn out the light” – in the Best Novel category.

Congratulations, too, to Kaaron Warren who has been shortlisted in three categories: Best Short Fiction (three times!), Best Long Fiction and Best Collection.

We’re not entirely sure when the winners will be announced (the Australian Horror Writers Association website may shed some light on the details in due course) but once again we’ve got all our mechadigits very firmly crossed, for however long they need to be.

Categories : Angry Robot, Awards
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Suited by Jo Anderton, art by Dominic HarmanSpecFaction NSW, the organising body for the Aurealis Awards – recognising the achievements of Australian science fiction, fantasy and horror writers – have announced the 2012 shortlisted finalists and we’re delighted to report that Jo Anderton has been nominated in the Best Science Fiction Novel Category for Suited.

Jo has also been shortlisted in both the Best Fantasy Short Story and Best Horror Short Story categories for ‘Sanaa’s Army’, which was published in Bloodstones, a dark fantasy anthology from Ticonderoga Publications.

The winners of the 2012 Aurealis Awards will be revealed at a gala ceremony on the evening of Saturday 18th May 2013 at The Independent Theatre in North Sydney. See the Aurealis Awards website for a full list of the shortlisted nominees.

All mechanical digits very firmly crossed!

Categories : Angry Robot, Awards
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The Age Atomic, by Adam Christopher, art & design by Will StaehleApril 4th is the publication date of Adam Christopher‘s brand new novel The Age Atomic; the power-packed sequel to Adam’s terrific 2012 debut Empire State.

Adam will be reading from and signing copies of The Age Atomic at the launch event hosted by Forbidden Planet Megastore on Shaftesbury Avenue in London, from 6.00 – 7.00 p.m. on Thursday 4th April.

As well as the standard paperback, book launch attendees will also have the opportunity to buy a copy or two of the Forbidden Planet exclusive limited edition hardcover edition of The Age Atomic; a genuine collectors’ item, of which only a hundred copies are being printed.

But wait, there’s more! We’re also printing a Forbidden Planet Exclusive limited edition hardcover of Empire State as well. And there are rumours surfacing that this one might have a variant cover…

Both hardbacks are priced at £20.00 and Adam will be delighted to sign them for you on the night. See forbiddenplanet.com for all the pertinent details, and if you’re going to be attending you can tell the world about it via the Age Atomic Launch Facebook page.

Categories : Angry Robot, Events
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This is Horror Black Feathers launch posterApril 4th is the official publication date of Joseph D’Lacey‘s brand new post-eco-apocalyptic dark fantasy Black Feathers and Joseph is marking the occasion with two launch events in the week leading up to publication.

The first of these is the Edinburgh Launch, in association with This is Horror and Blackwells Edinburgh South Bridge on Saturday 30th March. The event, which runs from 3.00 – 5.00 p.m. on Saturday afternoon, is a triple horror author show with Joseph’s fellow Angry Roboteer Gary McMahon, plus zombie godfather David Moody, hosted by Jasper Bark.

We’re reliably informed that all seated tickets for the event have been sold already, but more have been made available if you don’t mind standing up for the duration. Please e-mail events.edinburgh@blackwell.co.uk with the subject line ‘This Is Horror Event’ or call 0131 622 8218 for your free ticket.

If you can’t make it up to Scotland, then perhaps the London Launch at the Big Green Bookshop in Wood Green, London, on Friday 5th April would be the one to aim for.

The event will run from 6.30 to 9.00 p.m. on a feel-free-to-drop-in-and-say-hello basis (but make sure you drop in at 6.30 or you’ll miss Joseph’s reading from Black Feathers) with snacks and drinks provided. All very civilised, we’re sure you’ll agree.

Send an email to enquiries@biggreenbookshop.com or call them on 020 8881 6767 if you need more information about the London launch.

Categories : Angry Robot, Events
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